Obtaining Resources Home Page

From the Publisher

Preface

Chapter 1

Chapter 2

Chapter 3

Chapter 4

Chapter 5

Chapter 6

Chapter 7

Chapter 8

Chapter 9

Chapter 10

Chapter 11

Chapter 12

Chapter 13

Appendix A

Appendix B

Appendix C

Appendix D

Appendix E

References

Index (Search Engine)

Moursund's Websites

Appendix B:
Sample Private Foundation Proposal

For additional sample proposals and sources of grant opportunities see http://www.west.asu.edu/achristie/grants/.

Moursund, D.G. (2002). Obtaining resources for technology in education: A how-to guide for writing proposals, forming partnerships, and raising funds. Copyright (c) David Moursund, 2002.

Section Headings for Appendix B: Sample Private Foundation Proposal

Introduction

Sample Proposal

 

Introduction

This proposal was developed for use in workshops on grant writing. It has not been submitted to a funding agency.

This proposal is not intended to represent an ideal proposal to be copied. It was designed to have both good and not-so-good features. As you review the proposal, identify its strengths and weaknesses and think about ways it can be improved. Remember that there is a page limit on the length of the proposal. This proposal is right at the edge of the page limit. In addition, there are limits on font size. This proposal meets those limits. Use of a smaller font size in order to increase the length of the proposal is not allowed.

This sample proposal has been "evaluated" by the participants in a number of different grant-writing workshops and classes. Typically, participants are given about 20-25 minutes to read and evaluate the proposal.

The participants are asked to rate the proposal on a seven-point scale, with 1 being "Totally unacceptable, definitely should not be funded." and 7 being "Excellent, definitely should be funded." The participants are told that a proposal receiving a rating of 4 (Average) is not apt to be funded due to limitation of funds. They are also asked to make notes about good and not so good features of the proposal. This is to be done in a manner that supports and helps to justify their numerical rating and provides useful feedback to the proposal submitter.

Invariable, this component of the grant-writing workshop is a success. In a typical workshop, the proposal receives individual ranking in the range 3-6. The wide variation provides an excellent illustration of how a proposal can receive high marks from some reviewers and low marks from other reviewers. In the discussion that this generates, it becomes clear that the workshop participants have strongly held personal opinions about what constitutes good writing and what constitutes a good proposal.

Participants are able to suggest a number of ways to improve the proposal. Interestingly, some of the suggestions contradict each other. That is, it would take quite a bit of workshop discussion time to reach consensus on what changes to make to significantly improve the proposal.

 

Private Foundation: Support for Teacher Initiative

Applicant Mary Jane Peterson Position Teacher Grade 4

School Pacific Ocean Elementary School XXX Public Private

Address 23985 North Pacific Highway Phone (###) #######

City, State, Zip: City, State, Zip School Enrollment: 130 in grades K&endash;5

School District: Big Ocean School District

Project Title and Abstract:

Process Writing and Desktop Publication in the Information Age

Pacific Ocean Elementary School is a small public school with high expectations for its students. We expect all of our students to become adept at thinking and problem solving. We expect our students to learn the basics--but in a contemporary environment.

The problem addressed in this project is that our 4th and 5th grade students are lagging behind in developing the writing and desktop publishing skills needed in the Information Age.

Students in our 4th and 5th grades have emerging writing skills. They need to make use of these skills to do writing tasks of significant length, on varying topics, and making use of Information Age aids to writing and publishing. These writing tasks need to be intrinsically motivating to the students. We have set a goal that all of our students learn to use computers to do process writing and desktop publishing. This writing is to be done in a networked computer environment that includes Internet access, printers, digital cameras, and scanners.

In this project, students will have considerable freedom of choice on their writing topics. They will get to make extensive use of networked computer facilities, including digital cameras and scanners. They will write for varying audiences such as students, parents, and townspeople. All of this will help to create an environment in which students will be intrinsically motivated and will enjoy the writing and publishing processes.

Type of Project: Team project with outside match.

Amount Requested: $6,500 Total Cost of Project: $16,900

Applicant's Statement:

If this grant is awarded, I agree to use the funds as indicated in this application and submit a final report to the Trust on the implementation, results, and expenditures of this project; I further agree that the application materials and grant report can be used by the Trust for public purposes to help other educators. I understand that application materials become the property of the Trust and will not be returned.

Signature of application/team leader, and date:

 

Principal's Statement:

I have no objection to this project.

Signature and date:

 

Superintendent's Statement:

I am authorized by the School Board of Big Ocean School District to administer this grant without any overhead fee or other charges.

Signature and date

 

Process Writing and Desktop Publication in the Information Age

Table of Contents

Applicant & Team Member Names

Project Description

Supportive Research

Process Writing

Desktop Publishing

IT-Assisted Project-Based Learning

Project Purpose, Duration and Status

Purpose

Project Duration and Status

Project Evaluation Plan

Formative Evaluation

Summative Evaluation

Long Term Residual Impact

Dissemination of Report and Evaluation Results

Budget

Budget Details

Budget Notes

Other Resources

References

Letters of Support

Letter from Superintendent

Letter from School Board

Letter from PTA President

Letter from School Principal

Letter from Greenberg Electronics

 

 

Applicant & Team Member Names

 

Applicant & Team Leader

Mary Jane Peterson

Fourth grade teacher

Pacific Ocean School

Team Member

Pat Worthington

Assessment and Evaluation Specialist

Big Ocean School District

Team Member

Robert Jefferson

Fifth grade teacher

Pacific Ocean School

Team Member

Roger Greenberg

Owner, Greenberg Electronics

Business Person and Volunteer

Project Description

The problem addressed in this project is that our 4th and 5th grade students are lagging behind in developing the writing and desktop publication skills needed in the Information Age.

Students in our 4th and 5th grades have emerging writing skills. In addition, they know how to the various components of AppleWorks. They need to make use of these skills to do writing tasks of significant length, on varying topics, and making use of Information Age aids to writing and publishing. These writing tasks need to be intrinsically motivating to the students. We have set a goal that all of our students learn to use computers to do process writing and desktop publishing. This writing is to be done in a networked computer environment that includes Internet access, printers, digital cameras, and scanners.

In this project, all students in Mary Jane Peterson's fourth-grade and Robert Jefferson's fifth-grade classrooms will learn to design, write, and desktop publish newsletters. The basic skills of design, process writing, and desktop publication will be taught and practiced in a networked computer environment. Each classroom will have five networked computers, a projection system, a scanner, a digital camera, a printer, and Internet access.

The projection system and the networked computers in the classroom are essential to the mode of instruction that will be used. The projection system allows small group and whole class viewing and editing of student writing. The computers facilitate frequent student use throughout the day, and all students will learn to use these facilities. The project will be a full school year in length and will serve as the unifying focus in the writing curriculum for the year. During this time:

  1. Students will be given explicit instruction in process writing, desktop publishing, design of a newsletter, use of Slide Show in AppleWorks, use of a digital camera and scanner, and use of both email and the Web on the Internet.
  2. Students will be given explicit instruction in working collaboratively in the design, writing, and desktop publishing of a document. This includes learning to provide constructive feedback to peers as well as learning to self-assess one's own work.
  3. All students will do an extensive amount of process writing and desktop publishing both individually and collaboratively, making full and repeated use of the instruction described above.

Supportive Research

The research to support this instructional innovation falls naturally into three categories: 1) research on process writing; 2) research on effective communication in a desktop publication environment; and 3) research on information technology-assisted project-based learning. Brief summaries of this research are given below.

Process Writing

There is substantial research literature to support the effectiveness of process writing (ERIC Clearinghouse). Process writing begins with the brainstorming and development of ideas about a topic. This may involve a significant amount of research. Mind mapping and outlining software is quite useful in this step. Process writing then proceeds through a number of drafts of the document, with the main focus being on organizing and representing the ideas so that they communicate effectively. Then it culminates in careful polishing and publication of the final document.

Computers are very useful in process writing because they make it much easier to revise and to do repeated drafts. The email and the Web are useful in research needed at the beginning of a writing project, and as the project proceeds. There is an increasing amount of curriculum material designed to help teachers and students learn to do process writing and desktop publishing in a computer environment (Kurshan et al., 1994;

Desktop Publishing

Desktop publishing has now become the standard way that adults working in businesses "publish" their final written documents.

Desktop publication requires good knowledge of how to design an effective document (Yoder & Smith, 1995; Cohen & Williams, 1999; My Design Primer, 2002). What typefaces should be used? How much white space should there be on the page? What about the use of and placement of graphics? What works best for a particular audience&emdash;one column, two columns, or three columns?

IT-Assisted Project-Based Learning

The design, writing, and publishing and presentation of a newsletter is an example of Information Technology-Assisted Project-Based Learning. Project-Based Learning (PBL) is strongly rooted in the theories of Constructivism, Situated Learning, and Cooperative Learning (OTEC; Cooperative Learning Center). There is a large amount of research literature that supports the effectiveness of PBL and use of Information Technology in PBL (Moursund).

Many students find that both PBL and the use of IT in PBL are intrinsically motivating. In addition, this learning environment supports students learning both the topic area of the project and also IT. This teaching and learning environment strongly supports transfer of learning.

Project Purpose, and Duration and Status

Purpose

The goal of this project is for all 4th and 5th grade students in our school to learn to use computer technology to do process writing and desktop publishing. This writing and publishing will be done in a networked computer environment that includes Internet access, printers, digital cameras, and scanners.

There will be six major benefits to students:

  1. All students will gain skills in process writing in a modern networked computer environment that includes Internet access for research and communication.
  2. All students will gain skills in designing, creating, and desktop publishing a newsletter.
  3. All students will do a lot of writing, with different pieces of writing targeted for different audiences. Individually and collectively they will develop newsletters for their peers in other elementary schools in the district, students who will be entering the 4th grade in Pacific Ocean School next year (as well as the students' parents), their own parents, and adults in the community. They will also use
  4. All students will learn to critique the design, writing, and desktop publishing of other students.
  5. All students will gain collaborative experience in working in small group and large group writing and desktop publishing projects within their own classroom, where face-to-face meetings are possible. Each student will also work on a small group project where some of the team members are located in a different classroom, and communication is only possible through the passing of documents across the computer network.
  6. All students will gain skill in making use of a digital camera and scanner.

Project Duration and Status

The project will run for one entire school year. It is expected that the project will continue in subsequent years after the funding has ended.

This will be a new project in our school. Indeed, it will be a new project in our school district!

However, it is not a new idea in education. At a recent Northwest Council for Computers in Education conference, several of our team members attended a workshop on desktop publishing in the elementary school classroom. This workshop indicated that students in the upper elementary school grades have the capabilities and interest to do the design and desktop publishing of newsletters. The people doing the workshop gave examples from their own schools. They indicated that they had experienced considerable success in integrating such activities into their classrooms. A number of the curriculum ideas for this project came from the conference workshop presentation.

Project Evaluation Plan

This project will have formative and summative evaluations. We will also produce a report on the long-term residual impact. Pat Worthington, the Assessment and Evaluation Specialist for our school district will do the evaluation. She is a member of our project team whose time is being contributed by the school district. The school district is doing this because it wants to learn if the teaching and learning approach that is being used is effective. If it is, the district will implement on a wider scale.

Formative Evaluation

The formative evaluation is designed to provide feedback to the two classroom teachers who are implementing the Process Writing and Desktop Publication in the Information Age project in their classrooms. There will be multiple sources of information such as the students who are developing newsletters, students who will be receiving newsletters, and parents. In addition, a panel of four teachers from two other schools will be asked to review the lesson plans and examine sample newsletters produced by students.

Summative Evaluation

The summative evaluation will draw on information from five sources:

  1. Student opinion as to both the educational value and the fun of participating in designing and developing newsletters, working individually, in small groups, and in a whole-class mode.
  2. A survey of the various groups of people who have received copies of newsletters produced by the students. They will be asked to rate various quality aspects of the newsletters on a 7-point Likert scale.
  3. Anecdotal and other subject judgment information from the participating teachers and the parent volunteers as to the academic value of the overall project.
  4. Classroom observations by the project evaluator.
  5. Expert opinion from a panel of at least four teachers who will look both at the lesson plans of the two participating teachers and the newsletters produced by the students. They will be asked to evaluate these on a number of different issues, using a 7-point Likert scale.

Long-Term Residual Impact

The project will be considered to be a long-term success if it is continued in the original two classrooms in the year after funding ends, and if several other teachers in our school district implement the ideas in their classrooms.

Because the needed hardware and software will be in place, we have every expectation that the project implementation will continue in the two project classrooms next fall.

During the year, we will be working with teachers from a number of other schools and our own school to help them learn about what we are doing. We will be doing a half-day workshop during Spring Inservice Day in our school district. This will give a number of teachers a chance to gain some hands-on experience in doing newsletter desktop publishing.

The superintendent in our district has indicated interest in this project. If the project works well, we can expect support from the superintendent in wide-scale implementation.

Dissemination of Report and EvaluationResults

It is important that information about this project be disseminated to the schools and school board in our school district. The final report on the project will be disseminated to each elementary and middle school in our school district. The students and teachers in the project will make a presentation to the school board in its April meeting.

We are also looking for ways to get information about the project out to the general public. A reporter for our local newspaper has agreed to write an article about the project. We have not yet approached our local TV channel, but we will do so once the project gets underway.

Budget

The total project is budgeted at $16,900. Of this, $6,500 is requested from Foundation and $10,400 will come from Outside Match. In addition, other resources will be contributed to the project, such as the time of the outside evaluator. We have not assigned a dollar value to them.

Budget Details

Description of Budget Item

Requested from Granting Agency

Outside Match

Line 1: Ten multimedia computers

$8,000

Line 2: Two high speed laser printers

$2,000

Line 3: Two projection systems

$5,500

Line 4: Ethernet hubs, connectors, and wiring

$500

Line 5: Software license

$200

Line 6: Two digital cameras

$600

Line 7: Two scanners

$200

Totals

$6,500

$10,500

 

Budget Notes

Line 1: We need five modern computers in each classroom. The PTA in our school has committed $8,000 to pay for these machines. (See the Letter of Support from our PTA president.) The budgeted amounts are based on Brand XYZ computers that specifically meet our needs. They will be purchased through our Educational Service District Consortium computer buy.

Line 2: We need a high-speed, high-quality, high-capacity laser printer in each of the two classrooms. The School District has agreed to provide these printers. The budgeted amount is based on a Brand XYZ laser printer that specifically meets our needs. It will be purchased through our Educational Service District Consortium computer buy.

Line 3: Each classroom needs a high quality projection system to support whole class and small group presentations and interactions with the teacher. The budgeted amount is based on a Brand XYZ projectors that specifically meets our needs. They will be purchased through our Educational Service District Consortium computer buy.

Line 4: Roger Greenberg, of Greenberg Electronics, has agreed to provide the hubs, connectors, cables, and labor to network the two classrooms. The school already has Internet connectivity to each classroom. (See his letter in the Letters of Support.)

Line 5: A School Site License for the Brand XYZ software is $200. This software is specifically designed to facilitate small group and whole class mind mapping and outlining.

Line 6: We need one medium priced digital camera for each classroom.

Line 7: We need one medium quality scanner for each classroom.

Other Resources

Our team met with the Downtown Merchants Association. Six merchants have agreed to provide bulletin board space in store areas that have a lot of walk-through traffic. We can use these bulletin board spaces to create displays of student newsletters.

The School Board has scheduled a half-hour of their time in their April meeting to hear a report from students and their teachers on the Process Writing and Desktop Publication in the Information Age project.

The education reporter for our local daily newspaper has indicated that she will visit the participating classrooms sometime during the early spring and will do a news story on the project.

References

Cohen, S. and Williams, R. (1999). The Non-Designer's Scan and Print Book. Atlanta, GA: Peachpit Press Cooperative Learning Center at University of Minnesota [Online]. Accessed 4/16/02: http://www.clcrc.com/.

ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading, Writing, and Communication [Online]. Accessed 4/16/02: http://eric.indiana.edu/.

Kurshan, B., Kohl, H., & Kahn, T. (1994). Exploring Creative Writer&emdash;imaginative and fun computer activities. NY: Addison-Wesley.

Moursund, D.G. Information technology-assisted project-based learning [Online]. Accessed 4/16/02: http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~moursund/PBL/.

My Design Primer [Online]. Accessed 4/16/02: http://www.mydesignprimer.com/index.html.

Oregon Technology in Education Council. Learning Theory [Online]. Accessed 4/16/02: http://otec.uoregon.edu/learning_theory.htm.

Yoder, S. and Smith, I. (1995). Looking' good: The elements of document design for beginners. Eugene, OR: International Society for Technology in Education.

Letters of Support

Note: Each of the letters of support would be on letterhead stationery and on a separate page.

 

Letter from Superintendent

Dear Program Officer:

I have interacted closely with the team of people who wrote the Process Writing and Desktop Publication in the Information Age proposal. This proposal embodies our district's writing goals of teaching Process Writing. It also embodies the goals of having real world, hands-on, interdisciplinary experiences be a significant component of each student's education.

I am excited about this project. It is innovative, but grounded in the reality of the basics of education. It will help strengthen the relationship between our classrooms, community, and parents.

I, personally, will be monitoring the process of this project. If it succeeds as well as I expect, I will request funds from the School Board to implement a similar project at the other five elementary schools in our school district.

Sincerely yours,

(Superintendent)

 

Letter from School Board

Dear Proposal Readers:

I am writing this letter as an official representative of the Big Ocean School Board. I have read the Process Writing and Desktop Publication in the Information Age proposal and discussed it with two other members of the School Board.

If this project is as successful as we believe it will be, we will attempt to find the funds needed to implement it in all of our elementary schools.

Each spring we devote one of our School Board meetings to presentations of innovative projects being carried out by students and their teachers. I have already penciled in a half-hour presentation for the Student-Produced Newsletters project.

I strongly support this project and hope that it gets funded.

Thank you for your consideration,

(School Board President)

 

Letter from PTA President

Dear Proposal Readers:

The team of people submitting this proposal presented it to our PTA at its meeting last week. They requested that the PTA commit $8,000 to support the project if it is funded.

Via this letter, the PTA pledges to provide $8,000 to support the project. In addition, the PTA has decided that this project is very important to the other schools in our district. So, we will work with the Project Team to get sample copies of the student newsletters distributed to the PTAs of the other five elementary schools in our district.

Sincerely yours,

(PTA President)

 

Letter from School Principal

Dear Program Officer:

I am the principal at Pacific Ocean Elementary School. This school is located in the most socioeconomically depressed part of our town. Nearly 50% of our students are eligible for free or reduced-price lunch.

However, we are a good school and we help our students to get a good education. The reasons are many, but you can see them in the proposal that has been prepared by the Student-Produced Newsletters project team. We have good and innovative teachers, a strong PTA, and many parent volunteers. We stress the basics of education, such as reading, writing, and arithmetic. At the same time, we stress making use of the basics to accomplish tasks that require higher-order thinking and problem-solving skills.

I strongly support this project. It could well serve as a pilot for future changes that we will make at all grade levels. As part of my support of this project, the central office in my school will provide all of the facilities and labor in running off multiple copies of the newsletters to be produced by the students

Sincerely yours,

Pat Chen, Principal

 

Letter from Greenberg Electronics

Dear Foundation Officer:

I am the owner of Greenberg Electronics. Many years ago my children graduated from Pacific Ocean Elementary School. I have always been pleased by the education they received there.

The Process Writing and Desktop Publication in the Information Age project team approached my company to see if we would be willing to provide some technical support and materials in this project. I was so taken by the value of this project that I volunteered to provide (for free) the electronic components and the labor to create the needed networking. My company will also provide free consulting services as needed. The estimated value of this contribution to the project is $500.

In addition, I will provide bulletin board space in my two stores for displays of the newsletters that the students develop.

Sincerely yours,

Roger Greenberg

Owner, Greenberg Electronics

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