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UO ASSEMBLY MEETING October 4, 1978

The meeting was called to order by President William Boyd at 1535 on October 4, 1978
in room 150 Geology. There being no corrections, the minutes of the meeting of June 7 were approved as distributed

President Boyd stated that he would like for Vice President Olum to take the Chair
and to preside during the meeting of the Assembly. Vice President Olum assumed the
chair.

ANNOUNCEMENTS, REPORTS AND MEMORIALS

MABEL WOOD MEMORIAL: Ms. Margaret Wiese presented a memorial for Ms. Mabel Wood who died during the summer. Ms. Wood's tenure at the University as Head of the Home Economics Department covered the period from 1932 to 1964. The text of the memorial is included on page 4 of these minutes.

FREDERICK CUTHBERT MEMORIAL: Mr. Ronald Lovinger presented the memorial for Dean Frederick Cuthbert who died September 14, 1978. Dean Cuthbert served the University from 1932 until his retirement in 1971. (Text of memorial on page S.)

Mr. Lovinger moved that the two memorials be entered in the permanent record of the meeting of the Assembly and that copies be sent to the families of our departed colleagues. The motion was unanimously approved by a standing vote of the Assembly.

GTFF BARGAINING: President William Boyd stated that the Faculty Advisory Council had given him a series of questions regarding the role of the University in the event of a possible strike. The President said that subsequent to the receipt of these questions bargaining has resumed and that in view of this he would consider it inappropriate to speak to the subject at this time.

PRESIDENTIAL EVALUATION: President Boyd announced that the Board of Higher Education procedures call for evaluation of institutional presidents in the third year following appointment and every five years thereafter. The Chancellor conducts the evaluation for the Board. To date, both Presidents Blumel and Briggs have been evaluated under this procedure. The Chancellor expects to do much of the evaluation through an extensive series of personal interviews--with both individuals and groups.

"In addition to the preestablished interview schedule, the Chancellor is scheduling open hours at which he will meet with persons in the University community who might want to state their evaluation of me. He has scheduled 3:00s ao p.m., Wednesday, October 15, and 9:00-11:00 a.m., Thursday, October 19 for that purpose. He asked that this information be made available to the faculty, thus I am including it under announcements at this time. The hours will also be announced in Oregon Week.

The Chancellors office is on the second floor of Johnson Hall. Anyone wishing to see him at those times can do so by calling his secretary Karen McCumsey at extension 4153. If those hours are not sufficient, the Chancellor will make additional time available."

President Boyd also stated that he was waiving any right to see the evaluations.

ADVISORY COUNCIL. Ms. Diane Reinhard announced that the Faculty Advisory Council will hold open house on October 23 at (:00 p.m. in Collier House (Faculty Center). There will be no agenda. The Advisory Council members will be there to answer questions and to receive comments from anyone who wishes to join them.

SUAB. Gary McMahon made the following statement: "On behalf of the student body of the University of Oregon, the Student University Affairs Board we would like to express its concern over the current contract negotiations between the Graduate Teaching Fellow Federation and the Administration of this University. The SUAB wishes to encourage both the GTFF and the Administration to quickly settle this potentially volatile situation. Therefore, we have unanimously decided to support the fact finders report, as well as the GTF's in their quest to gain a fair contract. We take this position in order to protect the right of the students to a quality education, which we feel will be preserved through a fair settlement. We hope that or action on this matter will further the efforts of both sides to settle this matter promptly. Thank you,"

UNFINISHED BUSINESS

FACULTY PERSONNEL COMMITTEE. Mr. Stanley Greenfield presented the following motion:

"That only regular faculty with academic department or college appointments of 0.5
FTE or more be eligible to serve on the Faculty Personnel Committee. (Regular excludes
adjunct, visiting and courtesy appointments.)"

The motion was seconded. Mr. Robert Hurwitz, Secretary of the University Senate,
reported the Senate vote on the motion as 36 in favor, one against, and no abstentions
Mr. Stanley Greenfield spoke briefly to the motion, followed by the Senate reporter.
There was no debate. The motion was put to a vote and carried.

NEW BUSINESS

GERONTOLOGY MAJOR. Ms. Edna Wooten presented the following notice of motion: I move that the faculty authorize major programs leading to the Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Gerontology in the College of Health, Physical Education and Recreation and the granting of certificates to non-majors upon their fulfilling designated course requirements. "

STUDENT EVALUATION OF COURSES. Mr. Helmut Plant presented the following notice of motion: "At the November meeting of the University Assembly I shall move that the faculty adopt the recommendations on page 4 and 5 of the REPORT OF THE AD HOC COMMITTEE ON STUDENT EVALUATION OF COURSES distributed October 2nd."

JONNSON MEMlORIAL. Mr. Ronald Rousseve presented the following notice of motion: At the November 1978 meeting of the general faculty, I intend to move that: an ad hoc committee be formed to plan an appropriate memorial in celebration of the principles which were affirmed by the late Charles E. Johnson in his term of service as acting president of the University of Oregon during the 1968-69 school year. The memorial shall be scheduled during the 1979 spring quarter so that it might roughly coincide with the approaching tenth anniversary of President Johnson's death."

SENATE MEMBERSHIP. Mr. Robert Hutwitz presented the following notice of motion: "At the November meeting of the Assembly, I will move the following: that the vacancy bu the University Senate brought about by the demise of the School of Librarianship be filled as follows: 1. A University Library seat shall be created 2. The Library seat shall be filled at the same time the minor faculties choose their Senators, i.e., in May of even-numbered years. The term of office shall be two years; 3. All Library staff holding academic appointments are eligible both to vote and to be candidates for election to the Library seat; 4. The Library staff will hold an election as soon as possible in order to choose an interim Senator, whose term will run from the time of his/her election until June, 1980."

STUDENT EVALUATION OF COURSES. Mr. Paul Holbo presented the following notice of motion on behalf of himself and Mr. Stanley Greenfield: "At the November 1978
meeting, we shall offer the following amendments, substitutions, and additions to the motion of the Ad Hoc Committee on Student Evaluation of Courses to amend and
add to the legislation on Course Evaluations adopted by the Assembly on November 5
and December 3, 1975, and as amended June 2, 1976: To Ad Hoc Committee’s I. A) 1:
for the words "a standard, short substitute and short evaluation'; after the word, "form' add: "suitable to each individual teaching unit; change the word "four" to "three"; change b) under 1. to read "a short statistical survey eliciting student perceptions of general course qualities and teaching effectiveness; delete d) to c) and replace 'one" with 'a." Delete the Ad Hoc Committee's I. A) 1. Add a new I. A) 2 as follows: "That the preparation and use of all materials collected shall be in accord with established faculty policy ." To Ad Hoc Committee’s II. A. Substitute for 12) as follows: "That the questionnaire shall be administered in at least two representative courses each year." Delete 13) after the words "peer review"; substitute for 14) the following: "That administrators of each department or
minor faculty unit shall also prepare a course evaluation survey of their unit, including size of each class, number of respondents per class, percentage distribution of such respondents per class, and a comparison of departmental or Unit faculty ratings."in 15), change the words 'standard form' to "questionnaire.’ Delete Ad Hoc Committees II. B., which adds a 4) and 5 to Part II of the original legislation.

STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY

President Boyd presented the State of the University address. The complete text of this address is filed in the permanent record of this meeting; for reasons of economy the text is not being distributed with the minutes. Howewer, copies are available on request by calling the Secretary of the Faculty, extension 3682, or they may be picked up at 103 Johnson Hall.

The meeting adjourned at 1645.

Marshall D. Wattles Secretary of the Faculty

NOTE: The Report of the Ad Hoc Committee on Student Evaluation of Courses that was recently sent to all faculty members should have stated that faculty committee member Robert F. Tate dissented from the majority report.

MABEL A. WOOD, 1896 - 1978. As a memorial to Mabel A. Wood we wish to acknowledge not her death but her life. She was for countless students and others a special kind of friend and teacher. Her tenure at the University as the Head of the Home Economics Department stretched from 1932 to 1964, thirty-two years.

Born in Bridal Veil, Oregon, Mabel Wood started her teaching career in a country school. She attended Oregon Agricultural College and earned a B.S. degree in Home Economics. After four years as a Home Demonstration agent in California, she attended Columbia University and received her Master's Degree. Then she became an instructor at the Oregon Agricultural College and was subsequently recommended by them to come to the University of Oregon to develop a program in Home Economics.

Mabel was an innovator and a woman of great foresight. The philosophy with which she approached the field of Home Economics during those early years is consistent with that of the most advanced schools of Home Economics today. An emphasis on the value of comparable education for both men and women and a need for shared responsibility in the home were important to her. She felt strongly that knowledge of Home Economics enriched the quality of life of students and their effectiveness as human beings.

Again, as a pioneer, she helped initiate at the University a corp of scholars who were called abroad to share their knowledge and to learn of other cultures. In 1936, she set sail across the Pacific Ocean to spend her sabbatical year as a dome Economics instructor at Yenching University in Peking, China. Her return trip from China took her across the Asian continent on the Trans Siberian railway to Finland. This early experience opened the door to a life interest in travel and cultural anthropology. An extensive and Unique collection of authentic dolls including a pair or family group from many cultures resulted. She was an early member of the steering committee of the Foreign Student Friendship Foundation where she contributed her understanding of cultural barriers to the solving of problems faced by many foreign students in the University setting.

Mabel Wood is remembered with warmth as a person who had a cpmcerm and interest in the total University with friendships reaching out to many areas of the campus. She helped and encouraged many students--both American and foreign-through her willingness to share her home, to help find a job, to answer with grace countless questions concerning the arts of homemaking.

Mabel Wood--a native Oregonian, an innovator, an educator--her life among us of service and friendship, we remember and celebrate.

Respectfully submitted, Margaret Wiese

STATE OF UNIVERSITY ADDRESS--President Boyd

I heard a poet say of poets that each has only one poem within and spends a lifetime trying to write it. We see that in other authors, too, as Lessings or Updikes deal repetitively with human dilemmas that are themselves repetitive in our lives. Well, the affliction infects the mundane, too. It afflicts opening faculty addresses.

This is number four for me and I am embarrassingly conscious of the fact that, except for trivial details (and even they have a familiar ring), many of the things I want to share with this faculty have been said by me before. Still I do not do you the courtesy of saying `'welcome back, and 'gppdbue' for the day. Instead, I yield to a sense of urgency within myself--and to the insistent prompting of my partner, the Provost, who argues that I must share with you an annual appraisal of our problems and proposed directions. Like someone responding to the old cry Play it again, Sam, I call back 'One more time.

But, even with no claim for novelty, I hope I am doing more than idly flicking the beads of some academic rosary. One of the beads calls for the familiar refrain: enrollment is down again. The figures are still soft, and there is always some confusion surrounding the annual numbers game. Our projected head Count for this Fail was 16,557. Now it appears that the total head count will reach 16,350. Included in the figure, however, is a larger than expected number of older adult students registered in our Community Education Program. That is good news in its own way. We need to learn to serve such students so well that we attract them in ever larger numbers. But they are part-time, and their inclusion in the totals makes the figures deceptive.

The problem is compounded when regular full-time students find it necessary or attractive to take fewer than the customary fifteen hours needed for normal progress toward a baccalaureate degree. Comparison tallies from the arena registration suggest a reduction in term hours of between two and three per cent. That old bug-a-boo, the carrying load problem, raises its ugly head again. To give a measure of its significance, each one percent of budget reduction costs us $440,000. And if it sounds to you vulgar to hear a university president translate sacred things;into dollars, you can quickly enough translate right back into the legal tender of your realm--into salaries, colleagues, teaching assistants, supplies, decently maintained classrooms, and support when you need to travel for professional duties--for the who range of things which scholars need and dollars buy.

This problem of declining enrollment (and, thus declining dollars) has been our constant companion for as long as I have been your colleague. It seems unyielding. Most of our other problems stem directly from it, or are complicated by it. Its persistence has cost colleagues their jobs. It has restricted programs and thereby deprived students of educational opportunities which could have enriched their lives. It has also introduced a malaise that infects some survivors with a debilitating spiritual depression. Our first line of attack has been on the funding system that exaggerates the impact of student numbers. That remains an important issue, but it will never yield more-than partial relief.

We shall not have stability, security, or good morale as a University community until we have put this problem to rest, either by bringing pir enrollment up to the predicted and budgeted level, or by deliberately scaling down the staff and programs of the University in a manner that will achieve balance between income and expenditure. It is as true now as when I first mentioned it to you three years ago, that Oregon is some combination of underfunded and over committed, with scant resources stretched drum-head tight across multiple commitments. That tautness creates a tension in our daily lives, causing us to feel like paupers despite the richness of our environment. The incongruity calls to mind the final words of Oscar Wilde, who is reported to have said, as he sipped champagne on his death bed, "Here I lie, dying as I lived, beyond my means."

Since I first shared such an analysis with this assembly three years ago, we have reduced the range of program commitments. But we have not yet gained relaxation of tension because the intended savings have been absorbed by a combination of insufficient appropriations and this perennial underenrollment-the slug in our secret garden. It continues to creep ahead of us in our race for balance.

Striking that elusive balance must be our top priority. Harmony requires it. The choice is ours: attract more students, or delete more programs and reduce staff accordingly. So important a decision for Oregon must come neither by default nor in a manner to confirm historian Barbara Tuchmanis comment that the present is the cumulative result of past miscalculations. Either choice will permit us to achieve further distinction. We can be world class. There are such universities smaller as well as larger than Oregon. What we cannot do is maintain quality while wallowing in the marshes of despair and indecision that lie between the alternative routes to a healthy campus.

Since there is a choice to make, we are blessed to have the political freedom and the administrative autonomy required to exercise it. You are a charter-sheltered faculty, with more sovereignty than your contemporaries at most universities. The combination of your traditional power and my legal responsibility to lead only in consort with you, gives us a great measure of control over our futures. But if power is yours and a choice is ours, a moral responsibility for leadership, for suggesting direction, is mine. I am trying to exercise that, even at some risk of appearing arrogant at a time when leadership and authority are suspect and resisted throughout our society.

I have indicated two available routes for our choice. But I believe there is a preferred one. I want to identify it, make the case for it, describe what is being done and must yet be done to achieve it, and enlist your commitment and active support in its pursuit. Without that support, the University will certainly have to reappraise its purposes.

I believe that we should stay with a goal of remaining a university that strives to reach its Board-established ceiling of 15,500 full-time equivalent students each fall. There are a number of reasons why I believe it will be better to do that than to scale Our goal down to a size that could be maintained with less effort. Most importantly, a larger student body will support a larger faculty. An austere state like Oregon cannot be expected to permit us to enrich our faculty/student ratio by the simple expedient of dropping students. We should seek improvement of that ratio for educational reasons, but we cannot pursue it by manipulation.


A larger faculty is desirable for many reasons too obvious- to require explanation before this audience. Provision of job opportunities for a new generation of aspirants to academic life, the preservation of our modest gains in affirmative action, and the provision of additional openings for women and minorities are all good reasons for fighting against any avoidable reduction in size. There is also a significant educational reason. A larger faculty covering any given scope of disciplines can have more of the sub-specialities represented. That should facilitate scholarly interaction within the faculty, as well as provide more extensive program opportunities for students.

And there is another, less obvious reason: To achieve the desired size and then to hold it in the face of demographic change will require that we make ourselves more attractive to a wider spectrum of the public, more responsive to the mission assigned us by the people of Oregon, and more responsive to individual students after they have enrolled. We should behave responsively from commitment rather than from compulsion, but if we fall short--and I believe we do and that many of our troubles stem from that shortfall--then perhaps self-interest will compel us to behave as we should from self-dedication. A more attractive and responsive university would be a more humane institution, a more effective environment for teaching and learning. That goal lies at the core of our purposes. That was the thrust of last year's opening address, when I sullied a plea for a loving environment with an offensive simile involving a loveless image. I must do better than that. We must be a community of concern as well as a community of learning. Our procedure for appointments, reappointments, promotion and tenure help insure that we be the latter, but we leave the other too much to chance. We must learn to value concern as we do other forms of human and professional competence-- look to it when we seek colleagues; reward it when we find it among us. No trade-off need be involved. We can have both. Fortunately, the prescription for it is simple. Kurt Vonnegut gave it a lovely expression in God Bless You Mr. Rosewater, when he described the hero's baptism of a set of twins. Here's what he said he would say:

"Hello, babies. Welcome to Earth. It's hot in the summer and cold in the winter. It's round and wet and crowded. At the outside, babies, you've got about a hundred years here. There's only one rule that I know of, babies: God Damn it, you've got to This campus has hundreds of rules. I wish we could trade some of them for that one.

For a genuinely attractive campus--an environment made happy by kindness-our present enrollment goal of 15,500 Fall term full-time equivalent students would not be unrealistic. That would require a Fall head count of slightly over 17,500 students with our present mix. There might have to be a steadily rising number in a future that will see that mix change, with fewer young adults and more middle-aged or aged students here on a part-time basis. These so-called non-traditional students can compensate for the coming decline in the size of the eighteen-year old pool which has been pir fountain of youth in years past. If we continue to look for it for sustenance, then DeSotois fate will be ours, too.

The enrollment goal is not Unrealistic. The demographic predictions would support it, assuming that we have the imagination and flexibility required to change our ways as the state's population mix and educational needs change. Gerbers' jars in the pantry have given way to Geritol in the medicine cabinet. Our behavior must change, too.

We have not been ignoring the situation or the goal. In the recent past, however much of our attention has been directed at loosening the linkage between funding and enrollment, rather than at emphasizing enrollment.

There have been modest successes, thanks to support from the Chancellor's Office, the Executive Department, and the legislative assembly. The allocation formula known as CORA--once more ominously viewed and acronymed COBRA--has represented a search for a more sophisticated way to determine the legitimate needs of the respective campuses within the Oregon State System. It differentiates according to function. It lessens the dominance of credit hour production as the determinant of allocations of funds.

The practical consequences of CORA have so far been slight, but it is important for what it portends for the future. Ideas come first, Adams reminded us that our American revolution was accomplished first in the minds of humans. It remained until later to take on the Hessians. So may the likes of CORA eventually lend to a more rational and supportive allocation system for higher education.

Even now the enrollment driven model has checks on its force. It is applied to the variable, not to the fixed portions of our budget. On the overrun side of the enrollment problem--the other side of our mountain--present policy denies fiscal entitlement for students enrolled above institutional ceilings. It is tempting to be cynical about the willingness to deal first with that money-saving aspect of the student driven funding model, but that feature has in fact given the University of Oregon some relief. We have profited from the income produced by over enrollment on other campuses. Without it, we would have less money now--and fewer potential students, as well.

Most importantly of all, the one per cent slow slide rule--an ingenious protective device which was called for by the Chancellor, designed by Stafford Hansell, advocated by the Executive Office and adopted by the Legislative Assembly--has buffered us against the full consequences of our enrollment losses over the last two years. It limits our losses due to enrollment to one per cent per year. Without it, we would have had substantially fewer dollars in the current biennium.

With a lot of help from our friends--including the Emergency Board which provided relief from underfunding last October and hopefully will do so again this Fall, the University of Oregon has had relief--though not immunity--from the funding method we have seen as an enemy of quality education. Perhaps some additional relief lies ahead. The Executive Office, sensitive to our problems, has asked the Educational Coordinating Commission to propose alternative modes for funding higher education. Variations on the theme of a program budget-the goal we have been seeking--will surely be among the possibilities to be considered.

Of course, I do not mean to predict a funding system entirely indifferent to a workload measure so basic to a university as student credit hour production. We do not seek--we could not justify--total immunity. What we have sought with some modest success is amelioration of a system which has overweighted a single measure of workload in a complex institution caught in a difficult transition from a growth economy to a steady-state or even regressive situation.

Let me mention another encouraging development. Our own Board of Higher Education has invited this University to propose a plan whereby we might raise our admission requirements, with some guarantees of budget stability over the short period during which a change might lessen our enrollment. No promises, mind you, but consideration of our financial problem and of our aspirations to be a finer university even in a financially more difficult future. We shall not surrender to depression mentality. In spite of the budget reductions which have been imposed on us, and even with the anticipation of additional cuts in the future, we shall continue to build the strength and quality of this University. An example of this determination is our proposed new program in the neurosciences. It is now very close to realization and we are proceeding--damning the torpedos of six or eleven. We do so with the conviction that this area of study and research will be one of the most important scientific fields of the next decade. Knowing that we cannot realistically expect adequate state funds for this development, we are positions, money, and priorities within the departments of Biology, Chemistry and Psychology. We intend to have a program in the neurosciences which will be among the best and strongest in the country.

This is a time when every University is suffering financial difficulties, and when most are cutting back on programs. But such a moment may in fact be the best possible time to build a University for those with the courage and determination to make hard decisions and to plan with great care.

I mention these modest political achievements and immodest academic intentions because they should be reassuring to this faculty. Occasional appearances to the contrary notwithstanding, we are not a citadel surrounded by hostile forces--or even by indifferent Philistines. We have colleagues with audacity and imagination and we have friends and allies who are helping US. We can earn more such support by redoubling our efforts on campus and in the public arena. I shall take the initiative and responsibility for the latter part of that assignment, and I look to you for needed action in the other.

Efforts to alter our funding method have been only one of the ways by which we have addressed our familiar problem. In a more frontal assault, we have increased our efforts to attract more students to the University. The Admissions Office has been enlarged and reorganized, with personnel reassigned to make best use of the talents of each. New attention has been given to cultivating the helpful relationships with high schools, including the development and wide dissemination of a counselors guide which has been well received in the schools.

Contacts with out-of-state schools have also been intensified, with the results being carefully monitored to guide US in future expenditures. Already it is clear that the investment in such activity returns money to the university and attracts quality students to Oregon at no expense to our taxpayers. Moreover, the out of state and international students help create the more cosmopolitan environment we need to offset the provincialism which geographical isolation and cultural self-satisfaction tend to create on our campus.

The present workload to the Admissions staff is formidable. Approximately 17,000 applications are a part of the over 100,000 pieces of mail that office receives now in a single year. Add to that about 5000 campus visitors, with nearly 2,500 interviews with admissions counselors. This figure is up about 500 over last year, which was up from the year before. In 1977-78, over 6,500 high school students were contacted because of their high performance on College Board tests. That effort yielded an additional twenty three students who are among the finest now on this campus. For next Fall, we will contact another 10,006 such high school students across the nation, with a goal of adding another sixty at the very top of the ability level of our entering class. To further that effort to improve in quality, the University has become the only state system school which belongs to the National Merit Scholarship Program. We are offering several four-year scholarships based on merit this year, and we are determined to increase the number in the future.

Perhaps I am telling you more than you want to know about funding methods and recruitment efforts, but I have several motive-s. One, as noted earlier, is to provide reassurance that as a faculty you are supported by staff colleagues who share your concern for this institution and who, as you teach, are working to make prosperous. And perhaps I'm hoping to elicit some appreciation for the usually invisible efforts of classified and administrative staff. I admit to being touched, to finding especially poignant, a poem about administrators written by Joanne Wheeler, a nine-year old London school girl. Not knowing it was about us administrators and classified types, she entitled it 'Nobody Thinks of Us Feet.'! It goes like this:

Nobody thinks of us feet working so hard down here.

We come in all shapes and sizes big and small.

You say that we are smelly, that’s because you work us so hard.

We spend all day slaving away.

Nobody thinks of us feet."

Well, we know that Snoopy does, but I do want to call your attention to the often unappreciated works of the University's classified staff. They are even more harassed than faculty, working within a bureaucratic system which denies merit pay increases to persons at the top step of their classifications, forces them to take on new duties as other positions are left vacant, then makes reclassification difficult if not impossible. Within such a system, the rewards for many of them are limited. But I hope they will have the satisfaction of knowing that we all value them as our partners in a collegial community that values the worth and words of every member.

Let me return now to a few more words about our attempts to attract students. I have described our recruiting efforts to demonstrate that the gate keeper mentality of the past has been laid to rest. We shall not engage in Hucksterism Unbecoming to a great University, but we are aggressively seeking to improve the number, academic quality, and cultural and racial diversity of our entering students at the freshman and transfer levels. Additional new approaches are being planned for the future. Many of the efforts will require increased faculty involvement with high schools, with students and with parents. Some of you will be asked for help and I hope you will respond with enthusiasm.

We have also been working very hard to increase admissions at the graduate level. This have been done largely by the Deans, who have sought out those areas where the number of strong applicants exceeds what their faculties have been able to admit and work with in the past. By rearranging faculty assignments in imaginative ways and getting a modest amount of new faculty support from Academic Affairs. it has been possible for them to increase admissions significantly at relatively low cost. The result has been that, even with the loss of students resulting from the closure of the School of Librarianship and with the decline of graduate enrollments as anticipated in several fields, the total number of our graduate students is expected to be down only slightly from last year.

These efforts to improve our enrollment at the entry level are important, but they are marginal. To get at the heart of the enrollment problem--to make a difference at a level which will restore this University to a secure and adequate level of funding--we must address the retention problem. It has far more promise for us than further gains in recruitment. Even modest improvement would yield significant gains in financial support. Moreover, those efforts will improve our quality as well as our size, thus adding to the attractiveness which will help with both recruitment and retention.

We are not doing well enough at retaining students. One fact makes this clear; our new graduate enrollment is roughly constant, our enrollment of new freshmen is Up somewhat (Up significantly for out-of-state students), but the number of juniors and seniors who failed to return to school jas exceeded our expectations. This accounts for much of our Underenrollment. True, OUr performance is fairly typical of similar universities, bUt that neither excuses poor performance nor SUggeSts any inability to improve. Some universities do much hetter than we do, and we must match the best. If we did, we woUld not he in troUble now.

Some stUdents are lost to US because--even with help--they cannot or will not meet our academic demands. I regret sUch mismatches at the point of admissions, but I am not advocating any lowering of standards as an approach to higher enrallments. Some students are lost for a wide variety of reasons which are personal or vocational, and whicb lie beyond our ability to prevent. BUt-and this is my target groUp--some are lost to us becaUse they have preventable bad experiences on tbis campus. They find the environment too uncaring and non-supportive. Departing students report that they feel hassled. This perception applies to contacts with the central administration, for which I must be held directly accountable, The feeling is not limited to contacts with Johnson and Oregon Halls, however. Departmental offices frustrate, too, when information is unavailable or incorrect or given belatedly or patronizingly.

Perhaps most frustrating of all is the locked faculty office door, with a notice of limited or unobserved hours communicating its own powerful message to the buck-passed student. Let me mention a specific atrocity. A major problem this fall was missed appointments for advising and program planning--missed by faculty, not students, mind you. This should be a scandal among us. It is a betrayal of trust, a form of non-feasance that makes a special victim of a vulnerable student at a critical time. The hurt extends to the entire University when the result is the loss of students and their fiscal entitlement. That has been happening all too often. The scars are financial and moral. The rewards for improved behavior on our part will also be moral and financial. When we improve our responsiveness to the needs of all our students, we will be a better as well as a richer university.

In additional to responding individually with more personal concern for students, we need to respond institutionally by softening the bureacratic face of the university. Let us search out and repeal all of our unnecessary rules. Where the rules are needed, let us be judicious rather than rigid in enforcing them, remembering always that maxim of Roman Law which says "Follow the beneficial interpretation." And remembering also John Gardner's warning that hUmans "can toler extraordinary hardship if they think it is an unalterable part of life's travail. But an aministered frustration--unsanctioned by religion or custom or deeply rooted values--is more than the spirit can bear."

Now let me turn your attention to events off campus. That should be easy to do. Saturday's Register-Guard, reportTng on last week's Board meeting, covered an accurate story w-ith a two-line, three-column headline stating: Lieuallen expects giant cuts in higher education's budget. That must have attracted the attention of a few of you. People like myself--people who believe that drawing animals on cave walls will bring out the game--are terrified by the likes of that headline. In case you were bothered by it, I want to put it in some perspective. I have no arguments with the facts presented by the Chancellor or the journalist--not even with the headline writer--but the same analysis can yield a less frightening conclusion. A $14 million cut is mentioned. That is a disturbing prediction. It is accurate and I certainly do not mean to minimize it, but remember that the cut being anticipated is from a biennial asking budget of approximately one-half jillion dollars. The Ghancellor was not meaning to suggest that the institutions would function in the future with smaller budgets than in the past. The potential for growth is limited, but actual cuts belowexisting levels are not called for. Ballot Measure 11--the one being used as a pattern for the shaping of the executive budget--would cut statespending to 95 per cent of the 1977-79 level, then limit growth to the growth of personal income oYer the two previous years. Higher education in Oregon has been within those limits for the past decade. We have not been among the offenders who have hrought down pUblic wrath on government spending.

Ballot Measure 11 would permit us to have a 115 per cent budget. If we have less, it will be because of priority decisions made in Salem, not because of some inevitability of the ballot measure. If there is any justice, we will not be denied our fair share of the state’s limited budget. Higher education has already had its budget cuts. During the past decade, while the state's general budget was growing by 275 per cent, bigher educationts share grew by only 125 per cent. That contrasts with a growth of 294 per cent for the state contribution to public education and 342 per cent for human resources.

As the Chancellor pointed out, the cost of higher education per $1,000 of personal income has dropped over the decade from $8.78 to $7.29. And this relative decline in funding for higher education occurred at a time when the work-. load was increasing steadily. We have been faring badly by internal comparisons with otber state agencies or programs, and we have been faring badly compared with support for our counterpart universi-ties in reasonably simi1ar states like Colorado, Kansas, Iowa and North Caro1ina. The facts are, then, that Ballot Measure 11 does not automatically damn US to a bad bUdget, and that we have a strong case before the Governor and the legislature.

The myth of fat in the higher education budget is just that--myth. In three years of looking, I've not found it. We are the Cassius among institutions. Fat is not bere, but the persistent belief that it exsts is perhaps our worst enemy. Ayths die hard. Even on campus I encounter faculty and others who still believe that there is a cookie jar under my table. If that is true within the family, ane can hardly be surprised that there is a credibility problem outside.

In an attempt to demythologize, to make the case for our universities need For better levels of support, Oregon State President MacVicar and I have been traveling to a number of Oregon communities, holding joint meetings wfth alumni of the two schools and with legislators in their own home towns. Together we have visited Pendleton, LaGrande, Burns, Ontario, Lakeview, Klamath Falls, Medford, {orth Bend, and Astoria. Joined recently by President Blumel of Portland State Jniversity, we have held similar conferences in Beaverton and Roseburg. Several more are schedUled in the Portland and Eugene areas for this Fall--before and after the November elections. I believe we have a persuasive case to make and that we are building a network of supporters throughout the state.

During the period from now Unti1 next summer, this situation will receive priority attention from me, from Vice President Simic, and from Professor Charles Duncan, who has accepted an appointment as faculty liaison with the Legislative Assembly, replacing Stoddard Malarkey, who has taken leave to serve as Assistant Chancellor. He, too, will be working the Salem scene. All of us will be receptive to your advice and assistance.

Meanwhile keep the faith. WithoUt wealth, Oregon created this University and has sUstained it for over a CentUry. The state is distinguished for its literacy and for the high percentage of its citizens who have had college experience. OUght that not be an environment where we can reasonably hope for good judgement and justice to prevail?

October 4, 1978 (cont.)

FREDERICK A. CUThBERT, 1902-1978. On Thursday, September 14th, we marked the passing of our revered colleagUe and friend, Fred Cuthbert.

As the founder of the Department of Landscape Architecture in 1934 he brought to the State of Oregon and the Pacific Northwest a new consciousness of the natural landscape. His understanding of the preservation and development of our landscape and its importance to emerging urban areas found their expression in regional parks and open space systems from Seattle to Eugene; among them Alton Baker Park, the landscape of the State Capital, the Eugene Mall and the planning and landscape development of the University of Oregon campus.

Professor CUthbert served our university with dignity. As Dean of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts he guided US throUgh difficUlt times, always looking to the far horizon.

He was a great teacher; perceptive, inspiring and penetrating in his insights. I woUld always marvel at the end of a discUssion about a student's work when be would light his pipe, begin his remarks, pause a moment to tap and light his pipe again, and then concisely enUmerate the failings as well as SUCceSSeS in the work. He was nationally respected and served as the Chairman of the aoard of Fellows of the American Society of Landscape Architects. He founded the Pacific Northwest Chapter of this society and served as its president and trustee for over twenty-five years. Fred loved this university and in all bis works he sought to extend its importance and usefulness to the people in this community and state.

We mark his passing with regret and share his family’s loss. We recall his presence among US with a renewed sense of purpose, as his love of nature and of his fellowman pervades oUr memory of him.

Ronald J. Lovinger School of Architecture and Allied Arts

Mr. Chairman, I move that these memorials be entered intp the permanent record of this meeting and copies be sent to the families of oUr departed colleagues.

RegUlar Meeting of the FacUity

University of Oregon

November 1, 1978

The meeting was called to order by President Hilliam Boyd at 1535 on November 1. 1978 in roQm 150 Geology.

Thepe being no corrections, the. minutes of the meeting of October were approved as distributed.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION COMPLIANCE COMMITTEE. President Boyd called upon Ns. Patricia Schmuck for her summary of the report of the Affirmative Action Compliance Committee. Ms. Schmuck was not in attendance; the President stated that he woUld recognize her later for this purpose if she later arrived.

MOTIONS:`. President Boyd annoUnced that the motions by Mr. HelmUt Plant and Mr. Paul Holbo regarding stUdent evaluation of courses would not be offered at today's meeting. Likewise, he said the motion by Mr. Robert burwitz regarding membership in the University Senate will be held over to another meeting.

RESULTS OF ELECTiON President Boyd announcsd that Mr. Richard Schmuck was elected to membership on the Faculty Personnel Committee and Ms. Karen Achberger was elected to membership on the University Senate.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS

GERONTOLOGY. Ms. Edna Wooten moved as follows: 'I move that the Assembly authorize major programs leadinq to the Bachelor’s and Master's Degrees in Gerontology in the College of Health, Physical Education and Recreation and the granting of certificates to non-majors upon their fulfilling designated course requirements.

Following a second, Mr. Robert HUrwitz reported the Senate vote on the motion as 22 in favor, one against and 8 abstentions. Ms. Wooten spoke to the motion and Ms. Catherine Jones reported the discUssion to the University Senate. Following a brief discUssion, confined chiefly to procedUres for establishing new majors, Mr. Stanley Greenfield moved to refer the proposal to the Committee on the Curriculum. The motion was seconded, put to a vote and defeated. The main motion was put to a vote and carried.

M.S.WIlLLARD. Rresident Boyd recognized Ms. Myra Willard on a point of personal privilege. Ms. Willardis remarks were concerning the report of the Affirmative Action Compliance Committee which was distributed via campus mail. She commended the committee for its efforts but took issue with its conclusions and recommendatt.ons.

JOHNSON MEMORIAL. Mr. Ronald Rousseve moved as follows: 'That an Ad Hoc Committee be formed to pl-an an appropriate memorial in celebration of the principles which were affirmed by the late Charles E. Johnson in his term of service as acting president of the University of Oregon during the 1968-69 school year. The memorial shall be scheduled during the 1979 spring quarter so that it might roughly coincide with the approaching tenth anniversary of President Johnson's death."

Following a second, Mr. Robert Hutwitz reported the Senate vote on this motion as 27 in favor, none against and one abstention. Mr. Rousseve spoke to the motion, following by Ms. Catherine Jones on behalf of the University Senate. The motion was put to a vote and passed unanimously.

NEW BUSINESS

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION COMPLIANCE COMMITTEE Ms. Patricia Schmuck summarized the report of the Affirmative Action Compliance Committee of November 1, 1978 which had previously been distributed to the faculty by campus mail. She concluded hy stating that the four recommendations contained on pages 4 and 5 of that report constitute notices of motion and will be offered at the December Assembly meeting as motions.

INTERUNIVERSITY FACULTY SENATE. Mr. Richard Littman presented the following notice of motion: '.On behalf of the Advisory Council and the current members of the IFS it is moved that henceforth the University's representatives to the IFS be elected at-large from the faculty.

'There sball be three representatives to the IFS. Each member shall serve For three years with overlapping terms. At the earliest feasible time after the passage of this legislation there shall be an election for one person to erve the first three-year term. Because continuity of representation to the IFS is desira61e the representatives who are now serving a two-year term and a one year term shall be continued until their terms are completed. At that time, an election is to be held for successors who are to be elected to full three-year ;erms.

"Tbe representatives shall report regularly to the Advisory Council and, at the May meeting of the Assembly, shall present a formal report. In the event there is other business which the IFS representatives believe should come before the faculty, they shall take whatever steps-are suitable to hring sUch atters to the faculty's attention."

STUDENT EVALUATIO OF TEACHING. Mr. John Sherwood presented the following notice of motion: "I shall move that the Assembly adopt the following legislation, which shall supersede all previous legislation on the subject.

't1. It is the policy of the University faculty systematically to col]ect iata on student evaluation of teaching as a means for self-improvement and as a basis for decisions on salaries, promotion, and tenure, and for no other purposes;

't2. It shall be the prerogative of each teaching unit to determine the type f evaluation appropriate tp tje discipline and the intervals at which data are ollected; provided, that the Personnel Committee may set minimum standards for he quanti-ty and character of sUch data and may refuse to consider tenure and romotion cases which are not adequately supported.'

ADJOURNMENT

There being no further business the meeting adjourned at 1650.

Marshall D. Wattles Secretary of the Faculty REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY University of Oregon December 6, 1978

The meeting was called to order by Vice President Paul OlUm at 1540 on December 6, 2978 in room 150 Geology.

There being no corrections, the minutes of the meeting November 1 were approved as distributed.

ANNOUNCEMENTS AND MEMORIALS

OTTALIE TURNBULL SEYBOLT MEMORIAL. Mr. Horace Robinson presented a memorial for Mrs. Ottilie Turnbull Seybolt who died on September 10, 1978. Mrs. Seybolt served on the faculty at the University from 1928 until her retirement in 1955. The text of the memorial is included on page 4 of these minutes.

ELECTION RESULTS. Vice President Olum announced the election to the Graduate Council of the following faculty members to serve two-year terms beginning January 1, I979: from the College of Arts and Sciences, Mr. Sam Boggs and Ms. Carolin Keutzer; from the professional schools, Mr. Peter Bergquist and Ms. Maradel Gale.

CERTIFICATION OF FALL TERM GRADUATES: Mr. George Sheperd moved, "That the faculty of the University of Oregon recommend that the Oregon State Board of Higher EdUcation confer Upon the persons whose names are inclUded in the Official Degree List, as compiled and certified by the University Registrar after the December 8, 1978, Graduation Convocation, the degrees for which they have completed all requirements.

The motion was seconded, put to a vote and passed.

REPORT OF THE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE. Mr. C. W. Schminke, Chairman of the CUrriculum Committee, presented the annual report of the committee. He summarized the work of the committee and made several editorial changes in the report. Mr. Robert Hurwitz, on behalf of the Faculty Senate, moved that that Assembly approve the Report of the CurricUlUm Committee, dated November 17, 1978, beginning with page 1 and continuing through page 30 of the document headed "Proposed Course Changes for 1979-80.'' Mr. HelmUt Plant moved to amend by adding the words "no prereqUisites" for all UndergradUate Arts and Sciences courses that do not require prereqUisites as was contained in the original Arts and Sciences report to the Committee on the CUrriculUm. The motion to amend was seconded, following which there was a brief debate-on the sUstenance of the proposed amendment. Mr. Harold McLean moved the previoUs qUestions. The motion to close debate was seconded, put to a vote and carried. Mr. Plant's motion to reinstitute 'ino prereqUisites't was put to a vote and passed.

In keepidg with the established procedUre of the faculty the report was considered page by page. At page 27 Mr. James Boren suggested pUnctuatidn correctiQns in the description of HE 455. By general consent the punCtUatiOn will be corrected in the final report.

At page 29, Mr. Keith Richard moved to insert Lib 483 after Lib 482 and to indicate that Lib 482 is a prerequisite for Lib 483. Also, to indicate '3 credit hours each." A move to amend was seconded, pUt to a vote and carried.

Javing completed the page by page examination, the motion, as amended, was put to a vote and passed.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS

SENATE MEMBERSHIP: Mr. Robert Hutwitz made the following motion: "That the -acancy on the University Senate broUght about by the SUspensiOn of the School if Librarianship be filled as follows: 1. A University Library seat shall be .reated; 2. The Library seat shall be filled at the same time the minor faculties hoose their Senators, i.e., ;n May of even-numbered years. The term of office hall be two years; 3. All Library staff who are members of the voting faculty are eligible both to vote and to be candidates for election to the Library seat; |. The Library staff will hold an election as soon as possible in order to :hoose an interim Senator, whose term will from the time of his/her election until June, 1980." The motion was seconded, after which Mr. Hurwitz presented the the vote of the University Senate as 29 in favor, none against, and no abstentions. Mr. Hurwitz spoke to the motion followed by the Senate reporter, Mr. Ronald Sherriffs. There was no fUrther debate; the motion was put to a vote and passed.

STUDENT EVALUATION OF COURSES. Mr. Helmut Plant, on behalf of the Ad Hoc Committee on Student Evaluation of courses, presented the following motion: "I. kmendments:

A. That Part I, Sections 1 & 2 be replaced with the following:

1. That a standard, short form shall be adopted and used by all teaching Units of the University and that this instrument shall contain four parts: a) a statistical survey of student characteristics and class composition, b) a statistical survey of not less than six standard questions eliciting student perceptions of genera] teaching effectiveness, c) a section for optional departmental questions, d) one section eliciting open-ended comments.

2. That this single standard form shall not preclude any additional or supplementary questions or forms deemed necessary by any teaching unit of the University.

B. That in Part I, Section 4 all he deleted after ''explained to the stud

ents," and be replaced with the following: and that the open-ended potion of the adopted form, if signed, shall be included in each instructor's personnel record and that students shall be encouraged but

not compelled to sign. "II. Additions:

A. To Part I.

12) That the standard form shall be administered in all courses, every term, except in those courses which are excluded in Part II, Section 3.

13) That each department shall make provision for the recelpt and consideration of appropriate evaluative material outside of stUdent evaluations, including peer review and teaching material such as tests, syllabi, and assignments from individUa1 instructors. ,!

14) That in addition to the information from a,b, and c on the standard questionnaire, each department shall provice to appropriate committee and persons considering instructors for promotion, tenure, or posttenure review the following information: 1) a grade profile of each course and 2) the percentage of students who finish the questionnaire in each coUrse. Administrative Data Processing shall provide this information to each department.

15) That any standard form shall avoid discriminatory language.

B. To Part II

4) That each department, with the consent of the instructor, shall keep an open file for each course to include statistical information compiled from Part a and b of the standard form, a statement purpose from the instructor and all other information included in Part I 15 above and that this file shall be open to students and student groups.

5) That this program shall be reviewed annually by the Academic Standards Committee or another appropriate standing committee chosen by the President."

Mr. Robert Hurwitz reported,that the Senate vote on this motion was 16 in favor, 12 against and no abstentions. Mr. Helmut Plant spoke to the motion followed by Mr. Ronald Sherriffs, the Senate reporter. Mr. Paul Holbo moved the following substitute motion: "The following legislation shall supplant all previous legislation on student course evaluations of faculty:

"Pursuant to the mandate of the State Board of Higher Education for student input into the evaluative process for faculty tenure, promotion and review.

"1) Individual instructional units shall adopt and use suitable course evaluation forms containing two parts: a) a statistical survey of student characteristics and class composition, and B) a statistical

- survey eliciting student perceptions of course quality and teaching effectiveness;

"2) The forms so adopted shall be administered for each instructor in at least two representative courses each year, and a summary thereof shall become part of the instructor's personnel file;

"3) The administrator of each unit shall prepare a summary of course evaluation data on his or her unit each term, including size of each class, number of respondents per class, and a comparison of the faculty ratings within the unit; and the appropriate data summaries shall accompany each tenure and promotion case forwarded to college or university personnel committees.

"This legislation does not preclude any instructional unit from eliciting other kinds of student responses, such as open-ended comments, for the instructors personal use in improving the effectiveness of teaching; nor does it preclude the Unit from making provision for the receipt and consideration of appropriate evaluative material about teaching effectiveness in addition to student statistical evaluation, including peer review.’

Mr. Stanley Greenfield spoke to the substitute motion after which Mr. Robert Hurwitz stated that in the University Senate this substitute motion had been defeated, 18 in favor, 24 against, and one abstention. Following a lengthy debate, Mr. Paul Holbo moved the previous questions. The motion to close debate was seconded, put to a vote and carried. The motion to substitute was put to a vote and carried, 74 in favor, 37 against! The motion before the Assembly was now the substitute motion. Mr. Robert Hurwitz moved to amend under 2) by striking at least two representative courses each year,'' and inserting 'each course every term.'' The move to amend was seconded, put to a vote and defeated. The main motion (Holbo's substitute) was put to a vote and adopted.

NEW BUSINESS

The Chairman asked if there were any notices of motion to be presented at this time. There were none,

ADJOURNMENT

There being no further business the meeting adjourned at 1735.

Marshal Wattles Secretary of the Faculty

OTTILIE TURNBULL SEYBOLT, 1889-1978. Ottilie Turnbull Seybolt served on the faculty of the University of Oregon for twenty-seven years--from 1928 until her retirement in 1955. During that time she taught theater, voice and diction and interpretation first in the Department of English and later in the present Department of Speech.! She was also director of the University Theater from the time of her arrival until 1946. As a theatrical director she produced over 100 plays on the University of Oregon campus and established a tradition for high quality which was recognized throughout the country. Her scholarly interests were primarily in linguistics, phonetics and British dialects and she traveled and studied in England extensively in pursuit of those interests.

She was born in Connecticut in 1889 and her early interest in theater was stimulated by her father was was a drama critic. She continued her interest in theater and languages and received her B.A. from Mt. Holyoke College and her M,A. from the University of Wisconsin, and postgraduate study at Columbia University. As a young woman she was married to Robert F. Seybolt, a business man, now deceased. Before coming to Eugene Mrs. Seybolt taught at Vassar College, Smith College and Grinnell College of Iowa. In Eugene she was active in the Soroptimist Club, the Phi Beta Patrons, the Eugene Shakespeare Club, tube Committee for the Performing Arts and she was a life member of the Very Little Theatre.

For most of her adult life her social, recreational, professional and academic life centered around the theatre. It was an all consuming and satisfying passion which left little time for anything else exdept closely related activity. She was a perfectionist and no detail of theatrical production was too small to escape her careful scrutiny. Her key to theatrical achievement was precision and many generations of Oregon theatre students later successful in theatre, motion picture and television will testify to the exacting discipline exercised in ber rehearsals and performances. She was equally proud of those other students who followed their liberal arts training into other professional and avocational interests but all still exemplifying that rigorous training in speech, posture, movement and mental discipline. Although she was not a vigorous proponent of woments rights it should be noted in her daily activity and bearing she served as an excellent modeli. She held her own in the administrative strUcture of the University which in her time was essentially a man’s world. She was an independent thinker and spoke her mind freely and freqUently. The University of Oregon was hers and she was ours and all regret her passing on September 10, 1978.

The last years of her long retirement were spent in a nursing home in EUgene bUt her friends and associates prefer to remember her as that proud figUre hefore a class or riding her bidycle on the streets of downtown Eugene and on the walks of campUs--a bicycle only in repose in the marble corridor of Johnson Hall* opposite the Office of the President-- a proud figure, precise of speech and ele qant in deportment who left her mark on thousands of students are University of Oregon. It was a mark of distinction.

Prepared by Horace W. Robinson Professor Emeritus of Speech

Mr. Chairman, I request that these comments be entered in the minutes of the University Assembly and that copies be transmitted to her relatives.

REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY UNIVERSITY OF OREGON January 10, 1979

The regular meeting of the Assembly was called to order by President William B. Boyd at 1535 on JanUary 10, 1979 in room 150 Geology.

There being no corrections, the minUtes of the meeting of December 6 were approved as distributed.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

President Boyd announced that the two motions, the Affirmative Action Compliance Committee by Ms. Patricia Sehmuck and the Interinstitutional Faculty Senate by Mr. Richard Littman will be held over for the February meeting so they may come before the Senate.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS


There was no unfinished business.

NEW BUSINESS

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES. Mr. Clarence Thurber presented the following notice of motion: "On behalf of the Ad Hoc Committee on International Studies, T would like to give notice that at the next meeting of the Assembly, I will present a motion tbe purpose of which would be to establish an Undergraduate, interdisciplinary maJor in international studies."

ROTC. The secretary of the faculty read the following notice of motion on behalf of Mr. Bayard McConnaughey: "That this faculty recognize that military training is not an appropriate activity for the University of Oregon, and that it recommend to the President of the University, and to the State Board of Higher Education, that the ROTC contract between the University and the Department of Defense be terminated at the earliest date at which this is legally possible."

ADJOURNMENT

Tbere being no further business the meeting adjourned at 1550.

Marshall Wattles Secretary of the Faculty

REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY UNIVERSITY OF OREGON February 7, 1979

The meeting was called to order by President William Boyd at 15:35 on February 7, 1979.

There heing no corrections or additions the minutes of the meeting of January 10 were approved as distributed.

ANNOUNCEMENTS AND MEMORIALS

SCHMITT MEMORIAL. Mr. Carl Hintz presented a memorial for Mr. Martin Schmitt who served on this faculty from 1947 until his death on November 22, 1978. The text of

tEls memorial is included on page 3 of these minutes.

COMMITTEE ON ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS. Mr. George Sheperd presented a report outlining a change in the description of the requirements for work done in residence governed by the "percentage rules". The text of the report is included in these minutes on pages 4 and S.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION. Ms. Patricia Schmuck presented the following four motions as a package. "1. We recommend a program of positive incentives through additional allocations to increase 'good faith efforts' toward eliminating sex and race disparities.

"2" We recommend that President Boyd submit this report to the State Board of Higher EdUcation, that he request the State Board to assert its priorities concerning affirmative action, and that he request the State Board to direct the Chancellor to exhibit greater leadership in implementing federal and state mendates concerning affirmative action.

"3. We recommend the establishment of an Affirmative Action Support Committee to the Provost, to be appointed by the President. The purpose of the Support Committee shall be to advise the Provost on race and sex inequities.

"4. Ne recommend that deans, associate deans and department chairs demonstrate leadership by raising issues of sex/race bias within their faculties, by assuring screening committees include members of nonrepresented groupsj by using the resources available within the Jniversity for assistance, by exercisinc leadership that will eliminate bias and discriminatory behaviors among the faculty, heed the recommendations which apply to them and continue to make a yearly report of their prodress to the Vice Provost's Office."

The motion to approve the four recommendations was seconded. Nr. Robert Hur witz presented the vote of the Faculty Senate as follows: (1.) 37 in favor, 0 against, 0 abstentions; (2.) 35 in favor, 0 against, 1 abstention; (3.) 35 in favor, o against, 1 abstention; (4.) 27 in favor, 0 against, 8 abstentions. Ms. Schmuck yielded to Mr. Paul 0lum who discussed the action taken by the Provost's Office concerned with increasing the effectiveness of Affirmative Action at the University. After a brief discussion, and a report from Ms. Mavis for the Faculty Senate, the motion was put to a vote and carried.

At this point President Boyd relinquished the Chair to Vice President Paul 0lum.

INTERINSTITUTIONAL FACUiTY SENATE. Mr. Paul Holbo presented the following motion "0n behalf of the Advisory Council and the current members of the Interinstitutional faculty Senate it is moved that henceforth the University's representatives to the IFS shall be elected at large from the faculty.

"There shall be three representatives to the IFS. Ea-ch member shall serve for three years with overlapping terms. At the earliest feasible time after the passage of this legislation there shall be an election for one person to serve the first three-year term. Because continuity of representation to the IFS is desirable the representatives who are no-w serving a two-year term and a one-year term shall be continued until their terms are completed. At those times, an election is to be held for successors who are to be elected to full three-year terms.

"The representatives shall report regularly to the Advisory Council and, at t May meeting of the Assembly, shall present a formal report, in the event there is other bUsiness which the IFS representatives believe should come before the facUlty, they shall take whatever steps are suitable to bring sUch matters to the facUltyis attention."

Tbe motion was seconded after which Mr. Robert Hurwitz, Secretary of the University Senate, reported the Senate vote as 32 in favor, none against and one abstention. Mr. PaU1 Holbo spoke briefly to the motion; Ms. Mavis Mate reported there was no discUssion on this matter in the Senate. The motion was put to a vote and carried.

ROTC. Mr. Bayard McConnaughey presented the following motion: "I move that this Assembly recognize that military training is not an appropriate activity for the University of Oregon, and that it recommend to the President and to the State Board of Higher EdUcation that the ROTC contract between the University and the Department of Defense be terminated at the earliest date at which this is legally possible.

The motion was seconded. Mr. Robert HUrwitz gave the vote of the FacUlty Senate on this motion as 11 in favor, 19 against, and two abstentions. Following a twenty minute debate on this motion, Mr. Perry Morrison moved the preViOUS question. The motion to close debate was seconded, put to a vote and carried. The main motion was put to a vote and defeated by a vote of 29 in favor, 79 against.

STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY ADDRESS

President Boyd gave a state of the University address. (It was not circUlated to the facUlty.)

ADJ0URNMENT

Tbere being no further bUsiness the meeting adjourned at 1745.

Marshall D. Wattles Secretary of Faculty

NOTICE 0F MOTION. Mr. Derry Malsch asked that the following notice of motion be circUlated with these minutes. In according with faculty legislation, this motion will be presented at the March meeting of the Assembly. ''I will move ati the next General Faculty meeting that LingUistics 151 be inclUded amDng those courses which fulfill the Arts and Letters Group requirement and that Linguistics 311 be included among those coUrses which fulfill the Social Science Group Requirement.

MARTIN SCHMITT, 1917-1978. Martin Schmitt served on the faculty of the University of Oregon as Curator of Special Collections, University Library, for 31 years-from 1947 until his untimely death 22 November 1978.

Born in River Forest, Illinois in 1917, he attended Concordia Teachers College in that city and the University of Illinois. From the latter institution, he received the B.S. degree in joUrnalism in 1938 and the professional degree of B.S.L.S. in 1939. He remained at Illinois for a year on the staff of the Library and then went to Eureka College, EUreka, Illinois, where he served as Librarian from 1940 to 1941. The year of 1941-1942 was spent in graduate work at the University of Missouri pursuing one of his loves--journalism.

Martin sarved in the Armed Forces as Head of the Bibliography and Reference Section, Army War College Library, Washington, D.C. from 194? to 1946. While bere he rediscovered the manuscript autobiography of General George Crook, an unknowr document for some fifty years, and, as he put it, "the exciting task of reading and annotating was begun,'' culminating in the publication of General George Crook: His Autobiography, by the University of Oklahoma Press in 1946. This was the first of a number of significant manuscripts which he edited and prepared for publication.

Returning to civilian life, Martin went to the University of Idaho as Associate Librarian in 1946 but in the spring of the following year the University of Oregon Library beckoned in the form of a new Department of Special Collections with a curator responsible for rare books and manuscripts, university and other archives, and field collecting of historical materials from this region. Leaving a type of work--administration--which by his own admission, he found 'inot congenial,t' Martin, fortunately for the University, found his niche here and devoted the rest of his life to shaping and developing Special Collections into its present form.

Ne was a great collector, he was also a great interpreter. He enjoyed leading graduate students through the maze of historical research, and through his own scholarly publications made a wide body of materialsireadily available to others. Martin was particularly interested in photographic history. This interest found expression in collaboration with Dee Brown of the University of Illinois on three well-known books--Fighting Indians of the West, Trail Driving Days, and Settlers West.

martin served as a member of the Editorial Advisory Board, "Pacific Northwest Quarterly," and the Advisory Board, Champoeg Press, for a number of years. He was awarded the Waldo Gifford Leland Prize by the Society of American Archivists for hi-s Catalogue of Manuscripts in the UniVersitY of Oreqon LibrarY, published in 1971. He was a member of Sigma Delta Chi, professional journalism fraternity, and of the EUgehe RoUnd Table. He did his fair share of work on University committees.

We mark his passing with deep regret and share his family's loss. We shall miss him not only as a colleague with many professional attainments but also as a man who was a very human being.

Prepared by Carl W. Hintz Professor Emeritus of Librarianship Regular Meeting of the Faculty University of Oregon March 7, 1979

The meeting was called to order by Senate Chairer Catherine Jones at 1535 on "March 7, 1979 in room 150 Geology.

There being na corrections or additions the minutes of the meeting of February 7 were approved as distributed.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

The Chairer announced that the motion regarding International Studies which had been announced for this meeting would not be before the Assembly at this time.

The Chairer announced that the vacancy on the Graduate Council brought about by the resignation of Mr. Stoddard Malarkey is to be filled by Mr. Thomas Brady.

CERTIFICATION OF WINTER GRADATES. Mr. George Sheperd moved as follows: "That the faculty of the University of Oregon recommend that the Oregon State Board of Higher EdUcation confer upon the persons whose names are included in the Official Degree List, as compiled and certified by the University Registrar after the March 9, 1979 Graduation Convocation, the degrees for which they have completed all requirements." Following a second the motion was passed UnanimoUsly.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS

GROUP REQUIREMENTS. Mr. Derry Malsch moved as follows: "That Linguistics 151 be included among tbose courses which fUlfill the Arts and Letters qroup requirement and that Linguistics 311 be included among those courses which fulfill the Social Science Group reqUirement."

Following the second, the Chairer announced that the Senate vote on this motion was 28 in favor, none against and four abstentions. Mr. Malsch spoke briefly to the motion, followed by Mrs. Carrie Winegar, serving as the Senate reporter. A brief discussion followed after which the motion was pUt to a vote and passed.

NEW BUSINESS

RELISIOUS STUDIES. Mr. Jack Sanders presented the following notice of motion "At the next meeting of the Assembly I intend to move that certain courses in Religious StUdies coUnt toward the satisfaction of the Arts and Letters groUp reqUirement instead of toward the satisfaction of the Social Science groUp requirement.

ADJOURNMENT

_ .
There being no fUrther business the meeting adjourned at 1542.

Marshall Wattles Secretary of the Faculty

Regular Meeting of the Faculty University of Oregon April 4, 1979

The meeting was called to order by President William Boyd at 1535 on April 4, 1979 in room 150 Geology. There being no additions or corrections the minutes of the meeting of March 7 were approved as distributed.

ANNOUNCEMENTS AND MEMORIALS

Mr. Stanley Pierson presented a memorial for Dr. Thomas Govan who served as a member of the History Department from 1967 until his retirement in 1977. He died on Narch 5, 1979. His memorial is inclUded on page 2 of these minutes.

REPORT 0F AD JOC COMMITTEES. Mr. Robert Campbell presented a report of the Ad Hoc committee on a proposed memorial for the late Charles E. Johnson. The text of the report and the recommendations are included on page 4 of these minutes.

UNFINISHED BUSII4ESS


RELIGIOUS STUDIES. Mr. Jack Sanders presented the following motion: "That R111, Introduction to the Study of the Bible, and R431, Readings in Zen Classics, count toward the satisfaction of the Arts and Letters group requirement instead of toward the satisfaction of the Social Science grOUp requirement."

Following a second, Mr. Robert Hurwitz, Secretary of the University Senate, reported the Senate vote of 28 in favor, none against, two abstentions. Following a brief explanation of the motion by Mr. Jack Sanders, Mr. Richard Koch reported for the Senate. There was no further discussion, the motion was put to a vote and passed.

NEW 8USINESS

EXPERIMENTAL COURSES. Mr. Dale Sloat presented the following notice of motion: "A department or instrUCtOr may move that an experimental course (usually 199, 210, 310, 410, 510) be subjected to immediate review by the University Curriculum Committee on the grounds that it substantially duplicates an established course. If such motion carries, the experimental course will be withdrawn by the department sponsoring it and will not be taught unless it is approved by the University Assembly."

The President asked if there was additional new business. Mr. Ronald Rousseve asked concerning the next step" in establishing the Johnson Memorial. Following a brief debate Mr. Ivan Niven moved to approve in principle the report of the Ad Hoc Committee. The motion was seconded, put to a vote and carried.

STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY

President Boyd annoUnced that he had yesterday put in the mail a letter to each faculty member. Ne said that he hopes this letter will be usefUl and that he gets many written responses from the faculty.

ADJOURNMENT

There being no further business the meetiny adjoUrned at 1600.

Marshall D. Wattl es Secretary of the Facul ty

THOMAS PAYNE GOVAN
, 1907-1979. Tom Govan served the University of Oregon as a member of the Hjstory Department from 1967 to his retirement in 1977. Before coming to the University of Oregon he had taught at a number of universities, including New York University, Brown University, Tulane University and the University of the South. Born in Atlanta, Georgia, he received his Bachelor’s Degree at Georgia Tech, his Masters from Emory, and his Doctorate from Vanderbilt.

Tom Govan exemplified the concept of the teacher-scholar. He was a distinguished scholar in the field of American History. He published many articles and reviews and several books. During World War II while serving as a military historian he authored a series of studies for the Army. His major scholarly work was Nicholas Biddle, Nationalist and PUblic Banker,published in 1959 by the University of Chocago Press, a work which presented a fresh and influential interpretation of tbe life of one of the most significant figures in the early' development of the American nation. Shortly before his death. Tom’s doctoral dissertation, dealing with the early development of the banking and credit system in the state of Georgia, was selected for publication by the Arno Press.

Tom Govan, was, however, primarily a teather, it is as a teacher, I believe, that he would wish to be remembered. And the many tributes that came from former students across the country during his final illness testified to the continuing impact of his teaching. Historical study, the academic life, was not simply a profession for Tom; it was a vocation, a calling. It was a way of thinking and, in so far as it guided his relationships with people and institutions, a way of living. In scholarly debate he was often cantankerous--at times outrageously dogmatic; but he took great joy in the give and take of the contest and few who enyaged in sUch exchanges did not come away enriched by the encounter. His work, his life, was informed by strong religious convictions; he believed that understanding never emerges of itself from the facts-that only by means of a perspective, a point of view, a faith' could understanding be gained. This, I believe was the source of his power as a teacher, not only of his students at many universities but as a teacher of his younger colleagues at the University of Oregon.

Tom Govan had something of the courtliness, the charm, and the special gentleness of his Southern heritage. But he was also a strong and passionate man. He was a radical man in the real meaning of that term--one who goes to the root of things. At crUcia1 moments in his life his passionate radialness surfaced. In 1952, when the Board of Trustees at the University of the South refused to integrate the institution, Tom resigned his position as tenured professor and chairman of the History Department in protest. For this tirare and remarkable act of civic courage,t' as one of my colleagues express it, Tom paid a heavy price professionally. It was five years before he regained an academic position.

hte are saddened by the thought that he did not live to complete his projected work on Alexander Hamilton. For Tom possessed a rare, perhaps unique, understanding of the historical origins of the American experience. The quality of that understanding was evident in the series of Charles Deems lectures he delivered at New York University in 1975; his insights were apparent too in the series of television broadcasts on American radicalism produced for the educational networks in Oregon and Washington. But it was through a study of Hamilton that Tom had hoped to demonstrate the ways in which the English legal and religious traditions entered into the making of the American nation.

We--his friends--will miss him greatly, both as an adversary-partner in scholarly debate and as a warm and open human being,

Prepared by StanTey Pierson Professor of History


"Mr Chairman, I move that this memorial be entered into the permanent record of this meeting and copies be sent to Mrs. Govan.

Regular Meeting of the Faculty University of Oregon May 2, 1979

The meeting was called to order by President William Boyd at 1535 on May 2, 1979 in room 150 Geology. There being no additions or corrections the minutes of the meeting of April 4 were approved as distribUted.

ANNOUNCEMENTS AND MEMORIALS

Mr. Robert Smith presented a memorial for Professor Corwin Edwards who served this university from 1963 until his retirement in 1971. He died on April 20, 1979 at the age of 77. The text of the memorial is ;ncluded on pages 4-5 of these minutes.

CERTIFICATION OF SPRING AND SUMMER GRADUATES. Mr. George Sheperd moved as follows: 'That the faculty of the University of Oregon recommend that the Oregon State Board of Higher EdUcation confer upon the persons whose names are inclUded in the Official Degree List, as compiled and certified by the University Registrar after the June 10, 1979 and the August 11, 1979 Graduation Convocation, the degrees for which they have completed all requirements." :The motion was seconded, put to a vote and passed.

FACULTY ELECTION. The President announced that Mr. Frank Lacy of the Law School had been elected to fill the vacancy on the Graduate Council created by the resignatlon of Mr. Jan Broekhoff.

At this point in the meeting President Boyd relinquished the Chair to Vice President Olum.

UNFINISHED BUSINES5

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES:. Mr. Clarence Thurber presented the following motion: "On behalf of the Ad Hoc Committee on International Studies, I move that the University approve an interdisciplinary, undergraduate major in International Studies, sUpervised by a University Committee on International Studies to be appointed by the President. The major would require a minimum of 45 credits, divided between three core clUsters of courses entitled International Relations, Regional CUltures and Area Studies, and Global Perspectives and Issues. Three years of a foreign language or its equivalent will also be required. These requirements are elaborated in the proposal of the Committee, especially points f through V.

"The University Committee on the CUrriculUm shall review the accumulated operating experience with the program after three years, and report its findings to the University Assembly."

The Chair ruled that no second was necessary. Mr. Rob:ert Hurwitz, Secretary of the Senate, reported the Senate vote as 26 in favor, none against, and two abstentions. Following Mr. Thurberis comments on the motion, Mr. Jack Hart reported for the Senate. The debate that ensUed centered primarily on where the program should reside for administrative pUrposes. Mr. Roger Chickering moved that the motion be amended by inserting after the comma on line 3 the following words: ttresiding in the College of Arts and Sciences and..." Following a second, the motion to amend was put to a vote and carried. Nr. George Struble stated that the word ‘between" on the fifth line should be changed to 'tamong". The change was accepted by the Chair. The motion as amended was put to a vote and carried without dissent.

The legislation as adopted is as follows:

t'On behalf of the Ad Hoc Committee on International Studies, I move that the University approve an interdisciplinary, undergradUate major in International 5tudies residing in the College of Arts and Sciences and be supervised by a University Committee on International StUdies to be appointed by the President. The major would require a minimUm of 45 credits, divided ambng three core clusters of coUrseS entitled fnternational Relations, Regional CultUres and Area Studies, and Global Perspectives and Issues. Three years study of a foreign language or its equivalent will also be reqUired. These reqUirements are elaborated in the proposal of the Committee, especially points I through V.

"The University Gommittee on the CurricUlum shall review the accumulated operating experience with the program after three years, and report its findings to the University Assembly."

"r Chairman, I move that this memorial be entered into the permanent record of this meeting and copies be sent to Mrs. Govan.

RegUlar Meeting of the FacUlty

University of Oregon May 2, 1979

The meeting was called to order by President William Boyd at 1535 on May 2, 1979 in room 150 Geology. There being no additions or corrections the minutes of the meeting of April 4 were approved as distribUted.

ANNOUNCEMENTS AND MEMORIALS

Mr. Robert Smith presented a memorial for Professor Corwin Edwards who served this university from 1963 until his retirement in 1971. He died on April 20, 1979 at the age of 77. The text of the memorial is ;ncluded on pages 4-5 of these minutes.

CERTIFICATION OF SPRING GRADUATES. Mr. George Sheperd moved as follows: 'That the faculty of the University of Oregon recommend that the Oregon State Board of Higher EdUcation confer upon the persons whose names are inclUded in the Official Degree List, as compiled and certified by the University Registrar after the June 10, 1979 and the August 11, 1979 Graduation Convocation, the degrees for which they have completed all requirements." :The motion was seconded, put to a vote and passed.

FACULTY ELECTION. The President announced that Mr. Frank Lacy of the Law School had been elected to fill the vacancy on the Graduate Council created by the resignatlon of Mr. Jan Broekhoff.

At this point in the meeting President Boyd relinquished the Chair to Vice President Olum.

UNFINISHED BUSINES

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES. Mr. Clarence Thurber presented the following motion: "On behalf of the Ad Hoc Committee on International Studies, I move that the University approve an interdisciplinary, undergraduate major in International Studies, sUpervised by a University Committee on International Studies to be appointed by the President. The major would require a minimum of 45 credits, divided between three core clUsters of courses entitled International Relations, Regional CUltures and Area Studies, and Global Perspectives and Issues. Three years of a foreign language or its equivalent will also be required. These requirements are elaborated in the proposal of the Committee, especially points f through V.

"The University Committee on the CUrriculUm shall review the accumulated operating experience with the program after three years, and report its findings to the University Assembly."

The Cbair ruled that no second was necessary. Mr. Rob:ert Hurwitz, Secretary of the Senate, reported the Senate vote as 26 in favor, none against, and two abstentions. Following Mr. Thurberis comments on the motion, Mr. Jack Hart reported for the Senate. The debate that ensUed centered primarily on where the program should reside for administrative pUrposes. Mr. Roger Chickering moved that the motion be amended by inserting after the comma on line 3 the following words: ttresiding in the College of Arts and Sciences and..." Following a second, the motion to amend was put to a vote and carried. Nr. George Struble stated that the word ‘between" on the fifth line should be changed to 'tamong". The change was accepted by the Chair. The motion as amended was put to a vote and carried without dissent.

The legislation as adopted is as follows:

t'On behalf of the Ad Hoc Committee on International Studies, I move that the University approve an interdisciplinary, undergradUate major in International 5tudies residing in the College of Arts and Sciences and be supervised by a University Committee on International StUdies to be appointed by the President. The major would require a minimUm of 45 credits, divided ambng three core clusters of coUrseS entitled fnternational Relations, Regional CultUres and Area Studies, and Global Perspectives and Issues. Three years study of a foreign language or its equivalent will also be reqUired. These reqUirements are elaborated in the proposal of the Committee, especially points I through V.

"The University Gommittee on the CurricUlum shall review the accumulated operating experience with the program after three years, and report its findings to the University Assembly."

NEW BUSINESS

ASUO GUIDE Mr. Jess Barton gave the fol10wing notice of motion: i'That al1 instructors be required to submit a course description to the ASUO Guide for each of their CoUrses numbered 50-499 (exclUding courses numbered 199,--401406, 408 and 409), each fall, winter, and spring term. This policy would be effective begThning fall term, 1979."

COMPOSITION OF SENATE AND ASSEMBLY. Mr. Kevin Pope presented the following notice of motion: "I propose that the University Assembly vote to change the existing University governance organization by excluding clause 4 of the reorganization 1egislation, passed on Nosember 6, 1974.'l

CHANGE IN BACHELOR DEGREE REQUIREMENT. Mr. Robert Berdahl presented the following notice of motion: i'The Ad-Hoc Curriculum Review Committee of the College of Arts and Sciences moves: (To take effect, Fall Term, 1981) 1. That the requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in the University be specified as follows:

'B.S.--36 credit hours of Science or 36 credit hours of Social Science, and proficiency in mathematics. The mathematics requirement for the B.S. degree may be met in one of the following ways:

i) Satisfactory completion of an examination administered by the Mathematics Department, showing mathematical competency equivalent to that attained at the end of one year of college-level mathematics.

ii) Satisfactory completion of three courses from one of the following clus-ter bf courses: a) Mth 101, 102, 201, 202, 203 b) Mth 101, 207, 208, 209 c) Mth 115, 201, 202, 203 d) Mth 101, 231, 232 e) Mth 101, CS 133, Mth 150 f) Mth 101, CS 133, Mth 156 g) Mth 101, CS 201, 202, 203

"2. That the present list of courses given group-satisfying status expire at the beginning of Fall Term 1981. (This date could be delayed to coincide with tbe installation of new computer facilities.) "3. That during the academic year 1979-80, the College of Arts and Sciences and the professional schools and colleges provide lists of proposed group-satisfying courses to the University Curriculum Committee, which shall bring their recomendations to a vote of the University Assembly by the June 19:80 meeting. "4. That the present structure of group requirements be revised as follows:

Group A: 1. Literary and Artistic Studies

2. Expressive and Communicative Studies

Group B: 3. Historical Studies

4. Social Studies

Group C: 5. Mathematics and Symbolic Sciences

6. Natural Sciences
"5. That students in the professional schools and colleges be required to take 12
courses, three in each of the groups paired A, B, and C, and three additional
group-satisfying courses; and that 6 of the 12 courses are to comprise two
clusters* of three or more related one-term courses outside the major.
"6. That students in the College of Arts and Sciences be required to take 18
courses, three in each of the six groups, numbered one through six, iin the satis-
faction of their group requirements; and that 9 of the 18 oourses are to com-
prise three clusters* of three or more related one-term courses outside tbe major.
"*Clusters are to be understood as groups of three or more one-term courses which
dre closely related to one another. Clusters of courses could be composed of
sequences, but such would not have to be the case. It would be possible, for
example, for a set of courses which do not necessarily form a sequence, but which
are closely interrelated, to form a cluster; it would also be possible to build a
vertical clUster of courses, which might begin with one or two terms of work
at the 100-level, and then progress to a selection of courses at the 200- or
300-level. In addition, a cluster of courses built around a common theme, approached
from different disciplinary perspectives, could be constructed by several depart-
nents working together.

STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY

{rresident Boyd gave the following report to tbe faculty: The Faculty Advisory Coun:il has asked the President to indicate to the faculty that the Advisory Council as discussed salary issues with the President and is aware of the Siegel report showing that academic salaries are 1agging behind the salaries of society generally. The administration has been alerted and is concerned.

The Chancellor's Office is pursuing the same policy as in the recent biennia by seeking salaries for the State System on parity with the same nineteen comparative universities that have been used as the basis for comparison in the past. The President’s understanding is that to attai!n this parity will require 8` percent salary increase each year of the biennium.

The distribUtion of the salary increases anticipated is virtually the same as the last biennium when funds were distributed on the basis of merit, promotion, equity and across-the-board to those whose services to the university has been fully satisfactory. The only change from the most recent biennium is that the Chancellor has dropped the word "significanti' in reference to merit increase and, in view of inflation, is stressing across-the-board salary adjustments.

ADJOURNMENT

.

There being no further business the meeting adjourned at 1630.

CORWIN D. EDWARDS, 1902-1979. Professor Corwin Edwards came to the University of Oregon in 1963 and retired, emeritus, in 1971.

On April 5, 1979 he underwent surgery at the Baylor University Clinic in Dallas, Texas. He slipped into a coma on April 6 and died on April 20. He was 77. He is survived by Trudi, his wife and loyal companion, two children and their families.

Professor Edwards was pre-eminent in the field of competition policy, whether at the national or international level. His knowledge in the area was encyclopedic and his experience was legendary. His contacts were worldwide and at the highest level among those responsible for the enforcement of competition policy. His works on conglomerate bigness, price discrimination, foreign trade cartels, and the comparative analysis of competition policy will remain as standards for those of us who will continue in his path.

His work bore his cUstomary mark: insightful, complete coverage of the issues, sophisticated and authoritative. Professor Edwards was the Dean of those of us who work this field. He was a scholar, an academic and a man of action.

As a scholar, Corwin had a productive and illustrious career. He was a Rhodes scholar. He aUthored or participated in the pUblication of nine books and monographs and at least two dozen articles. When the Executive Committee of the American Economics Association decided in 1940 to publish a collection of articles of "permanent interest'i in the control of competition and monopoly, an Edwards' article was included. And when, in 1958, the Association published its second volUme in that area, Corwin had another piece.

n 1949, Corwin published his book, Maintaining Gompetition. It was designed to be a policy counter-weight to A Constitution for the Socialist Commonwealth of Great Britain by Beatrice and Sidney Webb. As Corwin ooserved:

The purpose of this book is similar in aim but opposite in direction to that of the Webbts book. It is to set forth the content of a policy to maintain the competitive system within the United States,

In 1959, he published his exhaUstic analysis of one of the more enigmatic aspects of our antitrust policy: The Price D-iscrimination Law.

Professor Edwards was a stalwart in the effort to preserve a competitive system at both the domestic and international levels. His interest in the international scene dates back at least to 1942 when he served as Chief of Staff for the American Technical Mission to Brazil. Nis monUmenta1 Trade Regulations Overseas and its companion volume, Control of Cartels and Monopolies: An International Comparison, broke new ground in the field of international antitrust. This was the result of work done by Professor Edwards and his wife, Trudi, during 1959 and 1960.

During the last twenty years, Corwin soUght to solve the intellectual puzzle posed by the existence of the conglomerate bUsiness power. The name and its deyelopment belong to him. Although, as he told me, he never quite got the handle on it that he desired, the concept and its implications are firmly established in our literature and antitrust policy.

As an academic, Professor Edwards taught at the following schools: New York University, Northwestern University, University of Virginia' Cambridge University, Graduate School of Business Administration of the University of Chicago, and the University of Oregon.

As a man of action, Corwin played many roles in government. Among these functions were: Co-ordinator of Trade Practice Studies of the National Recovery Administration; Ghairman of the Policy Board, Antitrust Division, Department of Justice; Chief Economics and Director of the BUreau of Industrial Economics, Federal Trade Commissioni head of the State-War Mission on Japanese Combines to advise the U.S. Government concerning the Japanese zaibatsu; U.S. Representative, Ad Hoc Committee on Restrictive Business Practices, U.N' Economic and Social Council; advisor to the President's Assistant for Consumer Affairs and, later, a member of the Consumer's Advisory CoUncil.

This October the Center for Law and Economic Studies of the Columbia Law School is presenting a conference on international antitrust. Corwin and I were each scheduled to give a paper. In addition, Professor Douglas Greer was al to prepare a paper. Professor Greer had been a stUdent of Corwin's and myself while he got his Bachelor and Masters degrees from the University of Oregon. Corwin and I were looking forward to the conference and papers by three generations of Oregonians. But now, one of will be silent.

Corwin D. Edwards was an esteemed colleague and treasured friend. In truth, he died as he lived--in pursuit of the active life.

Prepared by Robert E. Smith Professor of Economics

Mr. Chairman, I move that this memorial be entered in the permanent record of this meeting and that a copy be sent to his wife, Trudi Edwards.

Regular Meeting of the Faculty University of Oregon June 6, 1979

The meeting was called to order by Vice President Paul Olum at 1540 on June 6, 1979 in room 123 Science. There being no corrections.the minutes of the meeting of May 2 were approved as distriibuted.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

FACULTY CLUB SUMMER SERVICE.
Mr. George Struble announced that the Faculty Club food service woUld be open this sUmmer, beginning on June 20, serving lUnches on Mondays thraUgh Thursday.

LI8RARY COLLECTIONs. Mr. Paul Holbo stated that the Ad Hoc Committee on Library Collections has issued a repport and requested that a summary of this report be attached to the minutes of this meeting. There were no obJ`ections. The report is attached on pages 7-14.

FACULTY PERSONN REPORT. Mr. Charles Duncan presented the report of the Faculty Personnel Committee. The report is included in these minutes on pages 4-6.

ADYISORY COUNCIL REPORT
. Mr. Richard Littman stated that the report of the Advisory Council was not prepared at this time but that a report will be made in October.

SCHOLASTIC DEFICIENCY COMMITTEE. Mr. John Beebe gave the following report regarding-monitoring procedures of the Scholastic Deficiency Committee: "The Scholastic Deficiency Committee, which has the responsibility for translating the faculty legislation on the warning/probation system into terms which can be monitored by the computer wishes to inform the faculty that a change is being made in its monitoring rules. The change, which will go into effect as soon as the compUter can be programmed, will redefine ['progress towards a degree" insofar as the incomplete grade is concerned. In the past, the committee has counted ineomplete grades in its compiling of the 60%, 75%, and 80% rules by , which stUdents are placed in academic jeopardy. The faculty has recently passed legislation which tightens up the use of the incomplete grade by requiring that incomplete grades can no longer be made up with the former freedom AND that faculty members file with their departments the reasons for the incomplete apd the conditions for its removal. For this reason, and because using the incomplete punitively has workeJ undue hardship on many excellent stUdents--some of whom have primarly "Ai' grades, but are on probation because of incompletes--tbe committee will now exclude that grade as a determiner of progress.

''No change, on the other hand, has been proposed for the 'iY" grade status, which usually means that a student is not aware of being enrolled in that coUrse, or has dropped unofficially without going through proper procedures. It will continUe to be considered as "work attempted but not satisfactorily completed."


UNFINISHED BUSINESS

ASUO COURSE OUIDE Mr. Jess Barton made the following motion: "It is requested
that each department, school or college submit a course description to the
ASUO GUIDE for each of its courses numbered 50-499 (excluding coUrses numbered
199, 401-406, 408+ 409 and courses that are restricted to majors within the given
department school or college) each Fall, Winter and Spring term. The coUrse
description shall incl-ude the following:
a) The assigned reading and optional reading and their availability; the extent
and nature of homework assignments, required submissions and activities;
b) The objectives, ;mportance, and scope of the course;
c) The format of class meetings;
d) The specific methods and frequency of evaluations for credit and relative
weight of each;
e) Academic prerequisites;
f) When the course was previoUsly taUght by the instrUctor,
g) The average size of the class.

Following a second of the motion, Mr. Robert Hurwitz reported the Senate vote was 24 in favor, none against, and no abstentions. Mr. Barton spoke to the motion, followed by a report by Mr. George StrUble of the discussion of the University Senate. At this point the Chairman directed the Secretary of the Faculty to report on an agreement he has with Mr. Scott Bassett, the ASUO President, regarding the proposed GUide. The Secretary reported there was a signed agreement on two points: (1.) that the Guide would include all the information presented by the departments and, (2) that the Guide woUld carry disclaimer in these words, i'The information in this publication is subject to change without notice and does not constitUte a contract between the University of Oregon and a student." Mr. PaU1 Holbo moved to amend by inserting at the end of the motion, "That proof be provided to the departments prior to publicationof the GUide.'! Tbe motion to amend was seconded, put to a vote and carried by a vote of 70 in favor, 64 against. The motion as amended was pUt to a vote and carried.

EXPERIMENTAL COURSES. Mr. Derry Malsch presented the following motion: "A department may move before the University CUrriculUm Committee that an experimental course tusUally 199, 210, 310, 410, 510) be subjected to immediate review by that committee on the grounds that it substantially duplicates an established course. If such motion carries, the experimental course will be withdrawn by the department sponsoring it and will not be taUght unless it is approved by the University Assembly.'! The motion was seconded, following which Mr. Robert Hurwitz, Secretary of the University Senate, reported the Senate vote as 14 in favor, 7 against, and 6 abstaining. Following a brief discUssion Mr. HelmUt Plant moved to amend by inserting "at the end of the first term in which it is offered" after "it" in the last sentence and by changing the word "taught"to "repeated." Later in the discUssion Mr. John Beebe moved to amend bv replacing, in the amendment, 'first" by "subsequent." - This amendment was accepted by the maker of the motion. Following discussion, Mr. Charles Duncan moved to table the motion. The Chair ruled that the intent of the motion was to remove it from the agenda and that a two-thirds majority vote would be necessary for adoption of this motion. The motion was pUt to a vote and received the necessary two-thirds to remove this motion from the agenda.

UNDERGRADUATE REQUIREMENTS. Mr. Robert Berdahl moved the following motion: "1. That tbe requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in the University he specified as follows: B.S.--36 credit hours of science or 36 credit hoUrs of Social Science, and proficiency in Mathematics. The Mathematics requirement for the B.S degree may be met in one of the following ways: (i) satisfactory completion of an examination administered by the Mathematics Department, showing mathematical competency equivalent to that attained at the end of one year of college-level mathematics. (ii) satisfactory of three courses from one of tbe following clusters of courses: a) Mth 101, 102, 201, 202, 203; b) Mth lQ1, 2Q7, 208, 2Q9; c) Mth 115, 201, 202, 203; d) Mth 101, 231,232; e) Mth 101, CS 133, Nth 150; f) Mth 101, CS 133, Mth 156; 9) Mth 101, CS 201, 202, 203; h) Mth 121, 122, 123 (only for stUdents majoring in elementary education).''

Mr. Robert Hurwitz reported tbat before a vote could be taken on this motion in the University Senate the quorum had been lost but the Unofficial vote was 23 in favor, and none against. The Chairman suggested that the parts of the motion should be considered seriatim to which Mr. Berdahl said it was his intention to present the two parts as separate motions. There Part I was before the facUlty.

Mr. Richard Hill moved to delete the existing section (ii) and replace with the words "Satisfactory completion of one year in Mathematics and/or Computer Science of college level courses." The move to amend was seconded. Following a debate on the substance of the amendment, Mr. James Boren moved to postpone consideration of the motion Unti1 the November meeting of the faculty. After a brief discussion on the motion to postpone, Mr. John Sherwood moved the previous questions regarding postponement. The motion to call the motion was seconded, pUt to a vote and carried with the necessary two-thirds. The vote to postpone was put to a vote and carried 71 in favor, 46 against.

Mr. Robert Berdahl then moved the second part of his motion: "2. That the present list of courses given group-satisfying status expire at the beginning of Fall term 1981. That dUring the academic year 1979-80, the College of Atts and Sciences and the professional schools and colleges provide lists of proposed group-satisfying courses to the University CurricUlUm Committee, which shall bring their recommendations to a vote of the University Assembly by the June 1980 meeting. (This time schedule could be delayed to coincide with the installation of new computer facilities.)i'

Following a discussion on the merits of the issue, it was put to a vote and it carried.

POINT 0F PERSONAL PRIVEDGE. Mr. Charles Duncan rose to a point of personal privi1ege. He stated that when he joined this faculty in 1950 a major issue before the faculty meetings was groUp requirements; now that he was about to leave he noted that the matter of groUp requirements is being debated. His observation was greeted with applaUse by those assembled.

ADJOURNMENT

There being no further business the meeting was adjourned at 1730.

Marshall D. Wattles Secretary of the Faculty





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