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REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY March 4, 1970

The meeting was called to order by President Clark. The President stated that his attention has been called to the fact that a needed sentence is missing at the end of the first paragraph on page 4 of the February 4, 1970 minutes, relating to the faculty action on Mr. Lacy's motion concerning the Code of Student Conduct: i'The principal motion, as amended, was put to a vote and carried.i' With this sentence added, the minutes of the February 4 meeting were approved.

APRIL 1970 FACULTY 131EETING. The President announced that the April faculty meeting will be held on the second Wednesday of the month, April 8, in order to enable the Faculty Senate to meet on April 1, after the opening of the sprifig. term.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TTIE CURRICULUM. Mr. C. P. Patton, Secretary of the Faculty Senate, moved on behalf of the Senate that the report of the Committee on the Curriculum, dated February 25, 1970, arabic-numbered pages 1-20, be approved (a copy of the report is¢filed in the 8ffice of the iecretary of the,faculty as a part of these minutes). The motion was seconded. Mr. Patton also stated that, at the proper time, he would offer certain amendments on behalf of the Senate. While the report was before the faculty, Mr. G. N. Belknap, secretary of the faculty, left the rostrum to assist Mr. M. D. Ross, acting chairman of the Committee on the Curriculum in the absence of the chairman, Mr. D. R. Truax, in the role as secretary of the committee. During this period, Mr. R. L. Bowlin served as secretary pro tempore.

Mr. Ross reported that the Graduate Council has reviewed committee recommendations involving graduate credit and has approved all such recommendations. The President then presented the report to the faculty, page by page, inviting questions and amendments as each page was before the Faculty.

When the presentation reached page 8, Mr. Patton moved, on behalf of the Senate, to amend by deleting the (G) from the following proposed new courses: SL 486, 487, 488. Czech and SL 490, 491, 492. Ukrainian. The motion to amend was seconded. Mr. uans Linde, Senate reporter at this meeting, summarized the Senate discussion leading to this proposed amendment. Mr. Ross stated that the Senate action was reported to the Graduate Council, and that the Council approved the (G)'s in question. Mr. J. F. Beebe, member of the Russian faculty explained the nature and purpose of the instruction involved. Mr. Patton's motion was then put to a vote and defeated.

When the presentation reached page 9, Mr. Patton moved, on behalf of the Senate, to amend by deleting the (G) from SL 480, 481, 482. Serbo-Croatian and SL 483, 484, 485. Polish, where the (G)'s were part of proposed changes in old courses. The motion was seconded. Mr. Ross stated that these changes were approved by the Graduate Council. Mr. Patton's motion was then put to a vote and defeated.

The presentation of the report having been completed through page 20, the principal motion to approve was put to a vote and carried.

FACULTY ELECTION PROCEDURES. Mr. Patton reported that a calendar and procedures to govern Advisory Council and Faculty Senate elections, recommended to the Senate by the secretary of the facuity in accordance with legislation of June 4, 1969, have been approved by the Senate and are now in operation for the spring 1970 Advisory Council election.

STUDENTS' PER}LANENT ACADEMIC RECORDS. Mr. D. E. Rhoades, University Registrar and secretary of the Academic Requirements Committee and the Scholastic Deficiency Committee, reported a revised definition of information to -be included on students. permanent academic records, which has been approved by these committees. A copy of this report is filed in the office of the secretary of the faculty as a part of these minutes.

REORGANIZATION OF THE GRADUATE COUNCIL. Mr. A. R Ritzhaber moved on behalf of the Graduate Council the adoption of the following motion, in the absence of Miss Leona E. Tyler, who gave notice through the campus mail in January 1970:

That the faculty legislation of June 4, 1952 and December 3, 1952, setting forth the composition, powers, and responsibiliites of the Graduate Council be repealed and that the following legislation be adopted to replace it:

(1) That a Graduate Council, which shall also be an advisory committee to the dean of the Graduate School, be established, consisiting of the following: four members from the faculty of the College of Liberal Arts, four members from the faculty of the professional schools and colleges having graduate programs leading to degrees, and the current president of the Graduate Student Council. The Council shall elect its own chairman annually.

(2) That the faculty members of the Graduate Council shall be elected for twoyear terms by the general faculty at the same time as, and according to the same procedures as, the faculty Advisory Council is elected, with the exception of the provisos in items (3) -through (5) below.

(3) That no two faculty members from the same liberal arts department, or from the same professional school or college, may serve at the same time.

(4) That those elected the first time shall draw lots to see that two liberal arts and two professional school members serve one-year terms, the others, two-year terms, to provide continuity.

(5) That members of the Council be eligible for re-election.

(6) That the general faculty of the University grant to the Graduate Council authority to establish general policies and regulations governing graduate study at the University of Oregon, excluding those matters requiring approval by the Oregon State Board of Higher Education or the Chancellor.

(73 That the general faculty of the University grant to the dean of the Graduate School authority to make administrative decisions within the limits of established policies and regulations.

(8) And that nothing in this legislation be interpreted to preclude the right of any faculty member to appeal to the general faculty on matters pertaining to graduate policies and regulations. -

It having been seconded, Mr. Kitzhaber spoke to his motion, Mr. Patton reported that the Faculty Senate recommended its approval, and Mr. Linde summarized the Senate discussion. Nr. Belknap then moved the following amendment:

(a) That the words in paragraph (1), "four members of the faculty of the professional schools and colleges having graduate programs leading to degrees," be changed to read: "four members of the faculties of the professional schools and colleges having graduate major programs that lead to degrees and are conducted under the jurisdiction of the Graduate School."

(b) That the words in paragraph (2), "That the faculty members of the Graduate Council shall be elected for two-year terms by the general faculty at the same time as, and according to the same procedures as, the faculty Advisory Council is elected," be changed to read: "That the faculty members of the Graduate Council shall be elected for two-year terms by the general faculty in elections to be held during the fall term of the academic year and to be governed by the same procedures prescribed for Advisory Council elections."

(c) That the following sentence be added to paragraph (2): "The 1969-70 Graduate Council shall continue to serve until the completion of the fall term, 1970-71 election."

Nr. Belknap's motion was seconded by Nr. Kitzhaber, put to a vote, and carried. The principal motion, as amended, was then put to a vote and carried.

UNIVERSITY APPEALS BOARD. Mr. F. R. Lacy, chairman of the Student Conduct Committoe, moved on behalf of his committee the adoption of a motion establishing a University Appeals Board, as recorded in the minutes of the February 4, 1970 faculty meeting. By general consent, Mr. Lacy was allowed to present this motion by reference to the February 1970 minutes without reading the full text. The text is as follows:

That the legislative and judicial functions of the existing Student Conduct Committee be separated by the establishment of the University Appeals Board, which shall assume the juticial and appeals functions presently assigned to the Student Conduct Committee under the Code of Student Conduct. Specifically, that the Code of Student Conduct be amended as follows:

I.F. University Appeals Board (new section)

1. The University Appeals Board, by faculty legislation and by delegation of the President of the University, is the final appeals body under the Code of Student Conduct.

2. The Board shall consist of three student members recommended by the President of the A.S.U.O., and three faculty members, each a member of the University community in good standing, and shall be appointed by the President of the University. A quorum shall consist of two students and two faculty members. Terms of membership shall be one year from the time of appointment. Members may be reappointed, but no member may serve more than two consecutive terms. The President of the University may appoint temporary members to the Board to serve during such times as are necessary to assure full membership of the Board. The Board shall elect its own chairman.

3. The Student Conduct Committee may appoint one of its members to serve as an additional voting member of the University Appeals Board. The presence of this member will not affect the Board's quorum.

4. The Board shall establish rules of procedure for itself; however, an affirmative vote of four members of the Board shall be necessary to overrule a decision of a lower court or to convict in cases in which no lower court has made a decision. Inability of the Board to make an affirmative decision to overrule or convict shall be deemed a decision to affirm or acquit.

Present Sections I.F. through I.R. will become I.G. through I.I., respectively.

I.A.4.c. Substitute "University Appeals Board" in place of "Student Conduct
Committee.''
I.C.2. Substitute "University Appeals Board" in place of "Student Conduct
Committee."
I.D.3. Substitute "University Appeals Board" in place of "Student Conduct
Committee."
I.E.1. Delete "for d~sposing of such individual cases as may properly come
before it,"

Mr. Lacy's motion was seconded. Mr. Patton reported that the Faculty Senate recommended its adoption. Mr. Linde summarized the Senate discussion. By general consent, Mr. Lacy was then allowed to change the wording of paragraph 4 of Sec. I.F. to read as follows: "The Board shall establish rules of procedure for itself; however, an affirmative vote of four members of the Board shall be necessary to overrule a decision of a lower court or to find that a violation has occurred in cases in which no lower court has made a decision. Inability of the Board to make an affirmative decision to overrule or find that a violation has occurred shall be deemed a decision to affirm or find no viola~tion."

Mr. Lacy then moved to amend by changing paragraph 3 of Sec. I.F. to read as follows: "In any case, the Student Conduct Committee may appoint one of its members to serve as an additional nonvoting member of the University Appeals Board. The presence of this member will not affect the Board's quorum." The motion to amend was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

Mr. Lacy then moved to add the following sentence after Sec. I.F.: "And further, that the University Appeals Board be constituted and commence to function as soon as practicable, and that the present jurisdiction of the Student Conduct Committee be continued until the University Appeals Board becomes operative." The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

Mr. D. W. Richins questioned the jurisdiction of the University Appeals Board over graduate students, and moved to amend provisions contained in Sec, I.N.4. Of a revised code recommended by the ad hoc Committee on the Code of Student Conduct. Mr. Linde pointed out that the subject of this section was not now before the faculty for consideration. Mr. Richins withdrew his amendment.

Mr. Lacy's motion, as modified and amended, was then put to a vote and carried.

WITuDRAWAL FROM COURSES. Mr. Paul Civin, chairman of the Academic Requirements Committee, moved on behalf of his eommittee the adoption of the following motion:

Effective April 1, 1970, a student may withdraw from a course by filing the appropriate form with the Registrar prior to the end of the eighth week of the term. Por any withdrawal effected by a first-term student during the first five weeks of a term or by any other student during the first three weeks of a term, the course enrollment will not be recorded on the student's permanent record card; otherwise, the course enrollment will be recorded with the mark of ,'W."

An instructor is authorized to report a mark of "W" for a student enrolled in his course when submitting grades to the Registrar.

If a student has not effected a withdrawal in a course and the instructor has not reported a grade or mark at the time of submitting the final grade report, the Registrar is directed to record a mark of "O" (~no grade reported) for any course for which a student has officially enrolled.

Por purposes of interpretation with regard to other faculty legislation, the instructor may change any mark of "O," or of "W.' issued by him, to any other authorized mark or grade by filing the appropriate notice with the Registrar.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Patton reported that the Faculty Senate recommended that the first paragraph be adopted, and that the second and following paragraphs be referred back to the Academic Requirements Committee.

Mr. Civin spoke to his motion. Mr. Patton then moved to amend by providing that the first paragraph be adopted and the second and following paragrsphs be referred back to the Academic Requirements Committee, with instructions to make a written report to the faculty on the policies and practices involved, together with, or after the faculty has received, the report of the ad hoc Committee on the Grading System. The motion was seconded. Mr. Liade summarized the Senate discussion.

Mr. O. J. Hollis rose to a point of order, that Mr. Patton's motion was not an amendment, and that the question of the adoption of the first paragraph was already before the faculty as a part of Mr. Civin's principal motion. With- the consent of his second, Mr. Patton withdrew his motion and moved, instead, that all but the first paragraph of Mr. Civin's motion be referred back to the Academic Requireasnts Committee, with instructions to make a written report to the faculty on the policies and practices involved, together with, or after the faculty has received, the report of the ad hoc Committee on the Grading System. The motion was seconded.

Mr, Civin then moved to amend Mr. Patton's motion by providing that the entire principal motion be referred back to the Academic Requirements Committee. Mr. Civin's amendment having been seconded, he explained that the Academic Requirements Committee considered all paragraphs of the motion to be integral parts of a single proposal, and could not support piecemeal consideration. He then asked that a representative of the ad hoc Committee on the Grading System be heard, Mr. L. L. Lovell, chairman of the ad hoc committee, stated that his committee endorsed Mr. Civin's motion.

Mr. Bower Aly moved the previous question on all pending questions. The motion was seconded, put to a standing vote, and defeated through lack of a two-thirds majority: yes, 61; no, 57. After further discussion, Mr. Aly moved the previous question on the immediately pending question, Mr. Civin's amendment of Mr. Patton's motion. The motion for the previous question was seconded, put to a standing vote, and carried: yes, 106; no, LI. Mr. Fred Mohr, Mr. D. T. Smith, and Mr. G. W. Struble served as tellers for all divisions during the meeting.

Mr. Civin's amendment was then put to a vote and carried. Mr. Patton's motion to refer, now amended to apply to all paragraphs of the principal motion, was then put to a vote and declared carried by the chairman. A division being called for, the motion was put to a standing vote and carried: yes, 79; no, 40.

INTERINSTITUTIONAL FACULTY SENATE. Mr. Patton moved, on behalf of the Faculty Senate, that the faculty of the University of Oregon ratify the proposed constitution of an Interinstitutional Faculty Senate of the Oregon State System of Higher Ecuation. Copies of the proposed constitution and a summary of its evolution, mailed to the faculty on February 16, 1970, are filed in the office of the secretary of the faculty as a part of these minutes. The motion having been seconded, Mr. Linde summarized the Senate discussion.

Mr. Patton then moved that the secretary of the faculty conduct a mail ballot of the voting faculty of the University of Oregon on the question: Shall the faculty of the University of Oregon ratify the proposed constitution of an Interinstitutional Faculty Senate of the Oregon State System of Higher Edueation? The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

EXECUTIVE SESSIONS OF THE FACULTY. Mr. E. A. Cykler, chairman of the Advisory Council, gave notice that he would move at the April 1970 faculty meeting, on behalf of the Council, that the faculty empower the President of the University to call the faculty into executive session at his discretion. Unless specifically barred by the President's action, representatives of the press shall be admitted to such a session.

CONOITIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. Mr. A. W. Urquhart gave notice that he would move at the April 1970 faculty meeting, on behalf of the Library Committee, the adoption of the following resolution: -

(A) Recognizing that the good health of the University Library is essential to the functioning of the University as an instructional and research institution, the faculty of the University of Oregon wishes to call attention to the deteriorating condition of the Library of the University of Oregon.

(1) Demands on the Library have increased greatly.

(2) The staf£ of the Library has become increasingly dependent on less-permanent and less-experienced staff.

(3) Services have had to be curtailed greatly or performed inefficiently.

(4) Acquisition of books and materials has fallen far behind established minimum goals.

(5) Stated needs of the University faculty and students are not being met.

(6) Comparisons with similar University libraries show the University of Oregon's Library to rank low and to have fallen substantially in relative ranking over the past five years.

(B) Therefore be it resolved that the faculty of the University of Oregon recommend to the State Board of Higher Education and to the Legisiature of the State of Oregon that, to stop its further deterioration, the University Library be given highest priority in the allocation of funds and in the implementation of development planning of the University.

STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY. President Clark spoke briefly concerning the possible implications, for the University, of Governor McCall's recent executive order reducing state expenditures in order to meet an anticipated $19 million deficit in the state's public welfare budget.

There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned.

George N. Belknap Secretary of the Paculty REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY April 8, 1970

The meeting was called to order by President Clark. The minutes of the meeting of March 4, 1970 were approved.

INTERINSTITUTIONAL FACULTY SENATE. The secretary reported that a mail vote, ordered by the faculty at the March 1970 meeting, on the question of ratification of the constitution of a proposed Interinstituttonai Faculty 6enate of 'the Oregon State System of Higher Education resulted in the ratification: yes, 265; no, 34.

CONMITTEE TO STUDY R.O.T.C. CONTRACTS. Mr. J. F. Gange, chairman of the ad hoc Committee to Study R.O.T.C. Contracts, established by action of the faculty at the February 1970 meeting, reported that his committee has been unable to begin its studies because of delays in the appointment of members.

STANDING R.O.T.C. ADVISORY COMMITTEE. Mr. V. S. Sprague, chairman of the ad hoc Committee to Study R'O.T.C. Curriculum, commented briefly on the report of his committee, whLch has been distributed to the faculty through the campus mail. Re then moved, on behalf of his committee:

I. That a standing R.O.T.C. Advisory Committee be set up composed of faculty and students. The purpose of the committee is to be advisory to the President, the University faculty, and the military department on matters affecting the R.O.T.C. program at the University and to work cooperatively with the department in reviewing and making recommendations concerning the officer education program. Specifically, the committee shall have the following functions:

(1) Advise the President, the faculty, and the military department on matters concerning mil'itary education on tbe campus.

(2) Review and recommend to the institution's curriculum authorities all courses to be offered by the R.O.T.C., and reco end degree credit where appropriate.

(3) Review and recommend on all proposed R.O.T.C. instructional appointments to the faculty appointing authority of the institution.

(4) Hear appeals from students enrolled in R.O.T.C. on matters concerning their academic standing in R.O.T.C. and make recommendations in such cases to the appropriate authorities.

II. And that the proposed R.O.T.C. Advisory Committee require on-site interviews with all nominees to the position of senior officer in each division of the Department of Military Science and Aerospace Studies.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Clyde Patton, secretary of the Faculty Senate, reported that the Senate recommended its adoption. Mr. Sprague spoke to biS motion and Mr. Roland Bartel, Senate reporter at this meeting, summarized the Senate discussion.

Miss Sonia Sweek, vice-president of the Associated Students, was recognized and yielded the floor to a second student with the privilege of the floor under the rules of the faculty. The chairman several times ruled the second student's remarks out of order, as not germane to the motion before the faculty. A third student rose to protest the chairman's ruling; the chairman ruled that, under faculty legislation, the third student did not have the privilege of the floor. Both students continued to speak.

Mr. R. W. Leeper rose to a point of information, inquiring whether it might not be possible to relax the strict enforcement of the ruies so that the students might be heard. The chairman asked the will of the faculty.

Nr. S. S. Tepfer moved that the faculty resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole for a more informal discussion. The motion having been seconded, Mr. C. T. Duncan suggested that the period of informal discussion be limited by a provision that the committee rise not later than 4:30 p.m. Mr. Tepfer, with the consent of his second, accepted this suggestion as a part of his motion. The motion was then put to a vote and carried.

The Committee of the Whole rose at 4:30 p.m. and-the faculty resumed its business. The chairman pointed out that the business now before the faculty was Mr. Sprague's motion to establish a standing R.O.T.C. Advisory Committee and that debate must be germane to this motion.

Mr. Andrew Thompson moved that further consideration of Mr. Sprague's motion be postponed until the £aculty has considered a motion by Mr. Thompson, consideration of which was postponed at the December 1969 faculty meeting, pending the completion of'the report of the ad hoc Committee to Study the R.O.T.C. Curriculum. Mr. Thompson read a revised version of this motion, as follows: 'the Oregon State System of Higher Education resulted in the ratification: yes, 265; no, 34.

CONMITTEE TO STUDY R.O.T.C. CONTRACTS. Mr. J. F. Gange, chairman of the ad hoc Committee to Study R.O.T.C. Contracts, established by action of the faculty at the February 1970 meeting, reported that his committee has been unable to begin its studies because of delays in the appointment of members.

STANDING R.O.T.C. ADVISORY COMMITTEE. Mr. V. S. Sprague, chairman of the ad

hoc Committee to Study R'O.T.C. Curriculum, commented briefly on the report -

of his committee, whLch has been distributed to the faculty through the campus mail. Re then moved, on behalf of his committee:

I. That a standing R.O.T.C. Advisory Committee be set up composed of faculty and students. The purpose of the committee is to be advisory to the President, the University faculty, and the military department on matters affecting the R.O.T.C. program at the University and to work cooperatively with the department in reviewing and making recommendations concerning the officer education program. Specifically, the committee shall have the following functions:

(1) Advise the President, the faculty, and the military department on matters concerning mil'itary education on tbe campus.

(2) Review and recommend to the institution's curriculum authorities all courses to be offered by the R.O.T.C., and reco end degree credit where appropriate.

(3) Review and recommend on all proposed R.O.T.C. instructional appointments to the faculty appointing authority of the institution.

(4) Hear appeals from students enrolled in R.O.T.C. on matters concerning their academic standing in R.O.T.C. and make recommendations in such cases to the appropriate authorities.

II. And that the proposed R.O.T.C. Advisory Committee require on-site interviews

with all nominees to the position of senior officer in each division of the I

Department of Military Science and Aerospace Studies.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Clyde Patton, secretary of the Faculty Senate, reported that the Senate recommended its adoption. Mr. Sprague spoke to biS motion and Mr. Roland Bartel, Senate reporter at this meeting, summarized the Senate discussion.

Miss Sonia Sweek, vice-president of the Associated Students, was recognized and yielded the floor to a second student with the privilege of the floor under the rules of the faculty. The chairman several times ruled the second student's remarks out of order, as not germane to the motion before the faculty. A third student rose to protest the chairman's ruling; the chairman ruled that, under faculty legislation, the third student did not have the privilege of the floor. Both students continued to speak.

Mr. R. W. Leeper rose to a point of information, inquiring whether it might not be possible to relax the strict enforcement of the ruies so that the students might be heard. The chairman asked the will of the faculty.

Nr. S. S. Tepfer moved that the faculty resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole for a more informal discussion. The motion having been seconded, Mr. C. T. Duncan suggested that the period of informal discussion be limited by a provision that the committee rise not later than 4:30 p.m. Mr. Tepfer, with

the consent of his second, accepted this suggestion as a part of his motion. e-
The motion was then put to a vote and carried. ~
1
The Committee of the Whole rose at 4:30 p.m. and-the faculty resumed its business.
The chairman pointed out that the business now before the faculty was Mr. Sprague's
motion to establish a standing R.O.T.C. Advisory Committee and that debate must
be germane to this motion.

Mr. Aindrew Thompson moved that further consideration of Mr. Sprague's motion be postponed until the £aculty has considered a motion by Mr. Thompson, consideration of which was postponed at the December 1969 faculty meeting, pending the completion of'the report of the ad hoc Committee to Study the R.O.T.C. Curriculum. Mr. Thompson read a revised version of this motion, as follows: That the faculty recommend to the President: (1) That the Army and Air Force R,O.T,C. contracts be terminated as soon as possible within the terms of these eontracts. (2) That, if the Army or the Air Force indicate willingness to conside diPferent relations with the University, a committee be appointed to explore and develop suitable alternatives. These alternatives may include establishing loans, £ellowships, and scholarships to students, and grants to departments which offer relevant course work.

Mr. Thompson's motion to postpone consideration of Mr. Sprague's motion was seconde and, after discussion, put to a standing vote and carried: yes, 95; no, 82. Mr. R. L. Bowlin, Mr. Fred Mohr> and Mr. G. W. Struble served as tellers for this and other divisions during the meetidg.

TERMINATION OF R.O.T.C. CONTRACTS. Nr. Thompson's motion to terminate R.O.T.C. contracts now being before the faculty, Mr. Patton moved, on behalf of the Faculty Senate, that consideration be postponed pending receipt of the report of Mr. Gange's ad hoc Committee to Study R.O.T.C. Contracts. The motion was seconded. After discussion, Mr. A. P. Rubin moved to amend by providing that consideration be postponed until the Gange committee report is~received or until May 1970 faculty meeting, whichever is first. Mr. Rubin's motion to amend was seconded, put to a vote, and defeated. Mr. Patton's motion was then put to a vote and defeated.

Mr. Thompson spoke to his motion. Mr. Patton stated that there was no report from the Senate on the substance of the motion. Mr. Richard Grant then moved that, at the conclusion of the debate, the vote on the motion be by ballots distributed to the voting faculty through the campus mail. Mr. Grant's motion was seconded. The legality of a mail ballot under the rules of the faculty was questioned. Mr. O. J. Rollis pointed out that the faculty, at its March 1970 meeting, ordered a mail ballot on the question of the ratification of the constitution of a proposed Interinstitutional Faculty Senate, that the mail vote was conducted, and that the secretary of the faculty reported the results earlier in the present meeting. The chairman ruled that Mr. Grant's motion was in order. Mr. J. R. Menninger appealed from the ruling of the chair; the appeal being put to a vote, the chair was sustained. After further discussion, Mr. Grant's motion was put to a standing vote and defeated: yes, 72; no, 99.

Mr. K. W. Porter then moved that further consideration of Mr. Thompson's motion be postponed until the Faculty Senate has had an opportunity to study the motion and report. The motion was seconded and, after discussion, put to a vote and defeated.

~Mr. J. W. McClure moved the previous question. The motion was seconded, put to a standing vote, and defeated through lack of a two-thirds majority: yes, 84; no, 81.

Mr. Paul Civin moved that the meeting be adjourned until 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 15. The motion was seconded, put to a standing vote, and carried: yes, 108; no, 61.

George N. Belknap Secretary of the Faculty ADJOURNED MEETING OF THE FACULTY April 15, 1970

President Clark requested the attention of faculty members and visitors in ehe meeting room. He pointed out that the large number of visitors, overflowing the reserved visitors' gallery-and filling the aisles, presented a problem for the orderly conduct of business and for valid vote counts on measures that would be before the faculty--and asked that faculty members in the last row of the faculty section take seats toward the front of the room and allow visitors to occupy seats in the last row.

He then stated that he had not yet called the meeting to order for the officiaI conduct of business and that, before calling the meeting to order, he would recognize Miss Sonia Sweek, vice-president of the Associated Students, for a statement to the faculty. When Miss Sweek had concluded her remarks, the meeting was called to order.

TERMINATION OP R.O.T.C. CONTRACTS. The chairman stated that the first business before the faculty was Mr. Andrew Thompson's motion to recommend to the Preside1 that R.O.T.C. contracts be terminated, consideration of which was begun at the April 8 meeting and suspended when th~t meeting was adjourned. He also stated that the present meeting was a continuation of the April 8 session, and that consideration of Mr. Thompson's motion would be subject to the same parliamenta~ restrictiom that would have applied if the April 8 session had not been adjourned. In particular, the following motions, defeated on April 8, would not now be in order: (a) a motion to postpone consideration pending the receipt of the report of the ad hoc Committee to Study R.Q.T.C. Contracts; (b) a motion that the vote on the principal motion be by ballots distributed through the campus mail. ~

The secretary read the text of Mr. Thompson's motion--the secretary in the minutes of the April 8 meeting, from which he read the text, inadvertently omitted certain words from sec. (2), which are here restored:

That the faculty recommend to the President: (l) That the;Army and the Air Force contracts be terminated as soon as possible within theiterms of these contracts. (2) That, if the Army or the Air Force indicates willingness to consider different relations with the University, relations comparable to those available to other employers, a committee be appointed to explore and develop suitable alternatives. These alternatives may include establishing loans, fellowships, and scholarships to students, and grants to departments which offer relevant course work.

Mr. P. L. Csonka moved that debate on Mr. Thompson's motion be closed and a vote taken not later than 5:30 p.m. The motion was seconded. The chairman stated that Mr. Csonka's motion was undebatable and required a two-thirds majority for adoption. The motion was then put to a vote by a show of hands and carried: yes, 269; no, 29. Mr. R. L. Bowlin, Mr. Fred Mohr, and Mr. G. W. Struble served as tellers for this and other divisions.

Mr. Thompson read the correct wording of sec. (2), and spoke to his motion. In the course of his remarks he was interrupted by applause from the visitors' gallery. The chairman asked that visitors refrain from applause.

Mr. Bower Aly rose to a point of information, stating that he had been told that the Associated Students had conducted a poll concerning the R.O.T.C. and that a majority of the students responding had favored the continuation of the Univeristy's R.O.T.C. programs, and inquired whether anyone present had information concerning the results of this poll. Miss Sweek stated that such a poll had been conducted and showed a majority of 250 students favoring R.O.T.C. but that the officers of the Associated Students had been informed that its results would make no difference in the University's decision concerning the retention of R.O.T.C.

After further discussion, Miss Sweek asked that Mr. Stephen Holland, another student, be recognized for the purpose of showing a film as a part of the debate. Che chairman recognized Mr. Holland for thLs purpose. Mr. Franklin Lowenehal rose to a point of order, questioning whether the showing of the film would be in order. The chairman stated that he found no provision in the rules of the faculty tbat would exclude a film as a part of debate, and ruled the showing in Drder, if its content was in fact germane to the business before the faculty. {r. J. L. Rice rose to a point of order, asking how a member could gain recogniLion in competition with the film if he wished to question whether the film was in fact germane; he asked, further, whether, if a member gained recognition, the ~howing of the film would be stopped while this question was under consideration. Che chairman requested Mr. S. S. Tepfer to assist in handling these technical ~roblems. Mr. Lowenthal appealed from the ruling of the chair on the question ~f the showing the film. The appeal being put to a vote by a show of hands, the :uling of the chair was reversed: to sustain the ruling, 136; to reverse the "uling, 170.

Ehe Chairman then recognized Mr. Holland to speak to Mr. Thompson's motion. Sr. A. F. Moursund rose to a point of order, questioning whether Mr. Holland's :emarks were germane. The chair ruled the remarks germane. Mr. Rice appealed .rom the ruling. The chair was sustained. The vote to sustain the chair was reeted with applause from the visitors' gallery. The chairman again asked that risitors refrain from -applause.

5:00 p.m. Mt. R. W. Leeper moved to limit the ti-me allowed any speaker to our minutes. The motion was seconded, put to 4 vote, and carrLed by the required two thirds majority.

4fter further discussion Mr. Walter Freauff moved the previous question. The motion was seconded, put to a vote by a show of hands, and defeated for lack of a two-thirds majority: yes, 201; no, 121. Mr. W. F. McNeir rose to suggest that, since the vote on ~r. Preauff's motion had consumed four minutes of the time remaining for debate, four minutes be added to the debate period. The chairman ruled that such a motion would be out of order.

At 5:30 p.m, the chairman declared the debate closed. He pointed out that, with the aisles filled with visitors and some faculty members standing among the visitors, it would be difficult for the tellers to obtain an accurate count for the vote on Mr. Thompson's motion, and requested the cooperation of all persons in the meeting room to make possible a valid count.

At the chairman's request, the secretary read the definition of the voting faculty provided in faculty legislation: (1) all persons hoIding the academic rank of assistant professor or above; and (2) all persons holding the rank of instructor or senior instructor who are employed in the full-time teaching of courses, giving instruction exclusively in schools, colleges, and departments that offer work for University credit.

Mr. Aly rose to a point of information, whether the vote might be by ballot. The chairman stated that, in accordance with faculty custom, the vote would be by a show of hands. Mr. A. F. Rubin suggested that, during the period of voting, visitors seated in the last row of the faculty section relinquish their seats to members of the faculty. At the chairman's request, visitors moved out of the faculty section.

Mr. Thompson's motion was then put to a vote by a show of hands and defeated: yes, 172; no, 196. At the request of a member of the faculty, the chairman ordered a recount. On the recount, Mr. Thompson's motion was defeated: yes, 185; no, 199.

ADJOURNMENT. A member of the faculty moved that the meeting be adjourned. The motion was seconded. Mr. E, A. Cykler then moved that the meeting be adjourned, to reconvene at the discretion of the President. The motion was seconded. The chairman ruled that Mr. Cykler's motion had precedence. His motion was then put to a vote and carried.

George N. Belknap Secretary of the Faculty REGULAR MEETING OP THE PACULTY May 6, 1970

At 3:30 p.m., when the faculty was scheduled to meet in 150 Science Building, visitors occupied nearly all seats in the room, and the aisles were filled with visitors; a nonfaculty meeting appeared to be in progress. President Clark found his way to the rostrum. The secretary of the faculty was unable to enter the room. The President stated that conditions in the room made it impossible to convene the faculty meeting, and announced that the meeting would be moved to McArthur Court. In McArthur Court, members of the faculty were seated in a separate section of bleachers; several thousand visitors were in attendance.

.

The President stated that, in this time of great crisis in national affairs, the University codld not respond in a conventional manner. He then announced that he had asked members of the 1969-70 and the 1970-71 Advisory Councils and representatives of the Associated Students to meet tonight to plan effective campus-wide meetings and efforts to bring to the community an understanding of the depth of student feeling and despair over recent events--including the extension of the Vietnam War into Cambodia and events at Kent State University-and that, to provide uninterrupted time for these immediately pressing programs, the University would not hold regular classes as usual on Thursday and Friday of this week. These programs, however, would require serious and concentrated work on the part of faculty and students--for which the terms "holiday" and i'strike" are clearly inappropriate.

The President pointed out that he had not yet called the meeting to order and that, before calling the meeting to order, he would recognize Miss Sonia Sweek, president of the Associated Students, and several other students.

The students having been heard, the meeting was called to order. The minutes of the meetings of April 8 and 15, 1970 were approved.

ADVISORY COUNGliL ELECTION. The secretary reported that, on a second ballot, the election of the 1970-71 Advisory Council was completed, with the election of the following members: Wendell M. Basye, Edwin R. Bingham, Paul Civin, Bernd Crasemann, Thomas Hovet, Clyde Patton, Lloyd N. Staples.

BECOMMENDATIONS FOR DEGREES. The secretary announced that he had received a letter from Mr. D. E. Rhoades, University Registrar, certifying that the Official Degree Lists for the June 14, 1970 Commencement and the August 15, 1970 Graduation Convocation will include all and only those degree candidates who complete their degree requirements by the end of the respective terms. Mr. Pau1 Civin moved that the faculty of the University of Oregon recommend that the Oregon State Board of Higher Education confer on the persons whose names are included in the Official Degree Lists, to be compiled by the University Registrar after the June 14, 1970 Commencement and the August 15, 1970 Graduation Convocation, the degrees for which they have completed all requirements. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

SUSPEN=(N OF RULES, Mr. J. M. Allman moved that the rules be suspended to allow the immediate consideration of matters of current moment. The motion was seconded, put to a vote by a show of hands, and carried by the required two-thirds majority: yes, 305; no, 80. Mr. R. L. Bowlin, Mr. Fred Mohr, and Mr. George Struble served as tellers for this and other divisions. The chairman ruled that the faculty was now resolved into a Committee of the Whole.

MILITARY INVOLVEMENT IN INDOCHINA. When the Committee of the Nhole rose, Mr. R. M. Noyes moved to change the agenda to allow the immediate introduction of a resolution. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

Mr. lloyes then moved the adoption of the following resolution: Be It Resolved: That the faculty of the University of Oregon regards American military involvement ~ Ind~china as a tragic mistake and urges the govern~ent to termisate t~at involvement at the earliest practicable date.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Clyde Patton, secretary of the Faculty Senate, reported that, at the proper time, he would move on behalf of the Senate that the motion be tabled. Mr. Noyes spoke to his motion and Mr. S. A. Pierson, Senate reporter at this meeting, summarized the Senate discussion. Mr. Patton then moved that Mr. Noyes' motion be tabled. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and defeated.

Mr. Franklin Lowenthal moved to amend by adding the following sentence to Mr. Noyes, resolution: However, the faculty of the University of Oregon condemns, without qualification, any attempt to use either the Vietnam War or the~`vote on the R.O.T.C. as a justification for the recent violence on this campus. The motion was seconded.

The chair~ann ruled that Mr. Lowenthal's amendment was not germane to the subject fo Mr. Noyes' resolution and was therefore out of order in this context; but that, since Mr. Lowenthal had given notice under the faculty's ten-day rule for resolutions of this nature, it would be in order as an independent motion at the proper time.

Mr. Lowenthal stated that he had several more amendments to propose, and than moved to add the following sentence to Mr. Noyes, resolution: What is particularly unfortunate about ~is war and the invasion of Cambodia is that they divert attention from the grave threat to American interests in the Middle East, where Russian intervention and aggression threaten the existence of the state of Israel.

The cbairman ruled that the amendment was not germane and was therefore out of order. A member of the faculty moved the previous question on Mr. Noyes'~pprincipal motion; the motion was seconded. Mr. Lowenthal protested that he had further amendments to present; the chairman ruled that the motion for the previous question was in order.

Mr. A. P. Rubin moved that the meeting be adjourned; the motion was seconded. Mr. O. J. Hollis moved that the meeting be adjourned until 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 13, to reconvene in executive session; the motion was seconded. The chairman ruled that Mr. Hollis' motion had precedence. The motion was put to a vote and defeated.

The motion for the previous question was put to a vote and carried. Mr. Noyes' motion was then put to a vote and carried. Mr. R. W. Leeper asked for a division on Mr. Noyes' motion. Mr. Ivan Niven protested that, in the present atmosphere, members who wished to vote against the Noyes motion might well feel intimidated or subject to recrimination if they were required to display their votes in a division. The chairman ruled tbat a division was unnecessary.

During the course of the meeting, and while the faculty was in a Committee of the Nhole, visitors repeatedly commented on discussion and votes with applause or expressions of disapproval, and were repeatedly requested by the chairman to desist.

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ADJOUR~MENT. Following the vote on Mr. Noyes' resolution, Mr. C. T. Duncan moved that the meeting be adjourned, subject to the call of the President. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

George N. Belknap

Secretary of the Faculty ADJOURNED MEETING OF THE FACULTY May 20, 1970

The meeting was called to order by President Clark. The chairman stated that the minutes of the May 6, 1970 meeting and this adjourned meeting will be before the faculty for approval at the regular June meeting of the faculty.

TRANSFER OF CREDIT. Mr. F. B. DeChaine, chairman of the Admissions Policy Committee, made the following statement to the faculty, on behalf of his committee and the Academic Requirements Committee: The Admissions Policy Committee, in agreement with the Academic Requirements Committee has determined to depart from the long-standing policy of accepting at point of matriculation only credits earned in institutions within the United States of America possessing full accreditation by the appropriate

regional accrediting association. Instead, the Office of Admissions will be ;

governed in the future by the recommendations of the various reporting officers in the several states of the Union as published in the Report of Credit Given, the official publication of the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers. Credits earned in schools not accredited or recommended for transfer by the reporting officers will not be allowed at point of matriculation or later.

DEMONSTRATIONS AND VIOLENCE. Mr. R. H. Rodgers, rising to a point of personal privilege, read a statement concerning recent events on the University campus. In concluding his remarks, he addressed President Clark: '.I think I speak for many faculty and students when I state that the handling of the events of the past two weeks by your administration has increased our feeling of confidence and support in you and your staff." This concluding statement was greeted by applause from the faculty.

NOTICES OF MOTION. The secretary of the faculty made the following statement:

On May 7, 1970 a notice of motion by Mr. F. R. Lacy to amend the Code of Student I

Conduct was given through the campus mail, in accordance with the three-week rule. This motion will be on the agenda for the regular June meeting of the faculty. On May 15, 1970 three additional notices of motion were distributed to the faculty through the campus mail. Whether these notices were sufficient under the threeweek rule is at least questionable. However, proper notice may be given at this meeting, as an adjourned session of the regular May meeting, for consideration at the regular June meeting.

The secretary then requested unanimous consent to record these three motions, by Mr. C. N. CUrtis, Mr. E. F. Beal, and Mr. Paul Civin, in the minutes of this meeting, without requiring the reading of the texts. No objections being heard, the chairman declared that unanimous consent was granted. The following notices are therefore recorded:

DEPARTMEN1 OF MILITARY AFFAIRS. By Mr. C. W. Curtis: That the faculty recommend to the administration that:

(A) A new department (or program) shall be established (tentatively called the Department of Military Affairs) to replace the present Department of Military Science and Aerospace Studies. The new department shall be in all respects on an equal footing with other departments in the University. In particular, the new department shall have the following organization: (1) It shall be part of a college or school of the University. (2) The procedures for appointments shall be those normally used throughout the University. (3) The curriculum of the department shall be established by the normal procedures used in the University' with courses, credits, etc. approved by the Committee on the Curriculum. The possibility that courses in other departments (such as History, Political Science, etc.) carry joint credit in the new department is not excluded.

(B) The present R.O.T.C, arrangements with the Army and Air Force shall be renegotiated in order to establish new procedures to replace the present R.O.T.C. arrangements, so that students who wish to enter the R.O.T.C. program may be able to offer !

credits earned in the new department to satisfy all academic requirements in the -

R.O.T.C. program. All military training (distinct from academic study of military affairs) shall be done off campus, and will neither carry University credit nor count as a part of a student's course load.

PLAGIARISM. By Mr. E. P. Beal: The University expects that students will do their own original work in courses and seminars, and, in particular, that papers submitted for graduate credit shall adhere to accepted standards of scholarship, making full and accurate acknowledgment of sources, and differentiating quoted, paraphrased, or summarized material from the student's own contribution.

No college, school, or department of the University shall certify for a degree any student found to have submitted as his own work, for credit toward that degree, written material not his own, and not clearly and fully referenced in scholarly form.

Denial of a degree in the circumstances here outlined shall not be considered a penalty outside the Code of Student Conduct, which lists plagiarism as an offense and provides sanctions, but the withholding of an academic award that has not been earned.

SPECIAL STUDENTS. By Hr. Paul Civin, on behalf of the Academic Requirements Committee, the Scholastic Deficiency Committee, and the Admissions Policy Committee: That legislation of December 13, 1922 and May 21, 1924, pertaining to "rules

governing special students who are not candidates for a degree . . ." shall be -~
rescinded, and the following legislation adopted: 1
A special student is defined as an individual who does not hold a baccalaureate !

degree and who does not qualify or may not desire to qualify for regular undergraduate admission. The Admissions Policy Committee shall establish, and act as an appellate body on, policies governing the admission of special students. Each special student shall have his academic performance reviewed at least once each year by the Scholastic Deficiency Committee to determine whether he shall continue as a special student, be granted regular student status, be placed on academic probation, or be academically disqualified.

STANDING R.O.T.C. ADVISORY CONMITTEE. The secretary read the following passages from the minutes of the April 8, 1970 meeting of the faculty:

Mr. V. S. Sprague, chairman of the ad hoc Committee to Study the R.O.T.C. Curriculum, commented briefly on the report of his committee, which has been distributed to the faculty through the campus mail. He then moved, on behalf of his committee:

I. That a standing R.O.T.C. Advisory Committee be set up composed of faculty and students. The purpose of the committee is to be advisory to the President, the University faculty, and the military department on matters affecting the R.O.T.C. program at the University and to work cooperatively with the department in reviewing and making recommendations concerning the officer education program. Specifically, the committee shall have the following functions: (1) Advise the President, the faculty, and the military department on matters concerning military education on

the campus. (2) Review and recommend to the institution's curriculum authorities '
all courses to be offered by the R.O.T.C., and recommend degree credit where ~ i
appropriate. (3) Review and recommend on all proposed R.O.T.C. instructional l

appointments to the faculty appointing authority of the institution. (4) Hear appeals from students enrolled in R.O.T.C. on matters concerning their academic standing in R.O.T.C. and make recommendations in such cases tp the appropriate authorities.

II. And that the proposed R.O.T.C. Advisory Committee require on-site interviews with all nominees to the positioh of senior officer in each division of the Department of Nilitary Science and Aerospace Studies.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Clyde Patton, secretary of the Faculty Senate, reported that the Senate recommended its adoption. Mr. Sprague spoke to his motion and Mr. Roland Bartel, Senate reporter at this meeting, summarized the Senate dLscussion...Mr. Andrew Thompson moved that further consideration of Mr. Sprague's motion be postponed until the faculty has considered a motion by Mr. Thompson, consideration of which was postponed at the December 1969 faculty meeting, pending the completiQn of the report of the ad hoc Committee to Study the B.O.T.C. Curriculum . . Mr. Thompson's motion to postpone consideration of Mr. Sprague's motion was seconded and, after discussion, put eo a standing vote and carried: yes, 95; no, 82.

The chairman stated that consideration ot Mr. Sprague's motion would now be continued from the point at which consideration was terminated at the April 8 meeting. Mr. Sprague spoke to his motion. The motion was then put to a vote and carried.

AD HOC COMMITTEE TO STUDY R.O.T.C. CONTRACTS. Mr. J. T. Gange, chairman of the ad hoc Committee to Study R.O.T.C. Contracts, presented an Lnterim repart from his committee, and stated that a final report would be mailed to members of the faculty within a week.

EXECUTIVE SESSIONS OF THE FACULTY. Mr. E. A. Cykler, chairman of the 1969-70 Advisory Council, moved on behalf of the 1969-70 Council: That the faculty empower the President of the University to call the faculty in executive session at his discretion. Those representatives of the A.S.U.O. having privileges of the floor and, unless barred by the President's action, representatives of the press shall be admitted to such a session.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. C. P. Patton, secretary of the Faculty Senate, reported that the Senate recommended its adoption. Mr. CyLler then spoke to his motion, and Mr. Roland Bartel, Senate reporter for the meeting at which the Senate z~vlewe4 £he~motion, summarized- the Senate diacudsion.

Mr. D. R. Stannard moved to amend by deleting the words, "and, unless barred by the President's action, representatives of the press." The motion to amend was seconded. In reply to an inquiry, the chairman stated that, if Mr. Stannard's amendment were adopted, representatives of the press would be excluded from executive sessions called by the President. The amendment was then put to a vote and defeated. The principal motion was then put to a vote and carried.

CONDITION OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. Nr. A. W. Urquhart, chairman of the Library Committee, moved on behalf of his committee the adoption of the following resolution:

I. Recognizing that the good health of the University Library is essential to the functioning of the University as an instructional and research institution, the faculty of the University of Oregon wishes to call attention to the deteriorating condition of the Library of the University of Oregon.

(1) Demands on the Library have increased greatly. (2) The staff of the Library has become increasingly dependent on less-permanent and less-experienced staff. (3) Services have had to be curtailed greatly or performed inefficiently. (4) Acquisition of books and materials has fallen far behind established minimum goals. (5) Stated needs of the University faculty and students are not being met. (6) Comparisons with similar university libraries show the University of Oregon's Library to rank low and to have fallen substantially in relative ranking over the past five years.

II. Therefore, be it resolved that the faculty of the University of Oregon recommends to the President for transmittal to the State Board of Higher Education and to the Legislature of the state of Oregon that, to stop its further deterioration, the University Library be given highest priority in the allocation of funds and in the impLemediati~nof development planning at the University.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Patton reported that the Paculty Senate recommended its adoption. Mr. Urquhart then spoke to his motion. After discussion, Mr. Civin moved to amend by changing the work "highest" in Sec. II to "high." The motion to amend was seconded and, after discussion, put to a vote by a show of hands and carried: yes, 110; no, 73. Mr. Fred Mohr, Mr. D. T. Smith, and Mr. G. W. Struble served as tellers for this and other divisions. The principal motion as amended was then put to a vote and carried.

INTERtNSTITUTIONAL FACULTY SENATE ELECTIONS. Mr. Patton moved, on behalf of the Faculty Senate, the adoption of the following motion:
(A) Each year the Faculty Senate shall elect a member of the University of Oregon faculty to serve for a three-year term as a member of the Interinstitutional Faculty Senate of the Oregon State System of Higher Education. The procedures for nominating candidates and conducting the elections shall be devised by the Faculty Senate, and reported to the general faculty.

(B) The initial delegation of three University of Oregon representatives to the Interinstitutional Faculty Senate of the Oregon State System of Higher Education, who are to take office June 1, 1970, shall be elected at the May meeting of the Faculty Senate from a slate of nine candidates to be nominated by a nominating committee appointed by the chairman of the Faculty Senate. The lengths of the terms to be served by the members of the initial delegation will be determined by the Interinstitutional Faculty Senate at its first meeting.

It having been seconded, Mr. J. L. Hulteng spoke to the motion. The motion was then put to a vote and carried.

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ENGLISH COMPOSITION REQUIREMENT. Mr. Roland Bartel moved: (1) That the requirements for a bachelor's degree, "English Composition, 9 term hours unless excused," adopted by the faculty on April 5, 1933, be amended to read, "English Composition, 6 term hours unless excused''; and (2) that the following courses be specified for the satisfaction of this requirement: Wr 121. English Composition. 3 hours; Wr 323. English Composition. 3 hours.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Patton reported that the Faculty Senate recommend its adoption, Mr. Bartel spoke to his motion. It was then put to a vote and carried.

PRESIDENT OF THE A.S.U.O. SENATE AT FACULTY MEETINGS. Mr. R, W. Robinson, chairman of the Student-Faculty Council, moved on behalf of the Council: That the proceedings of the regular faculty meetings be amended to provide for reports from the president of the A.S.U.O. Senate, or his designate, concernLng any matter coming before the faculty which has been discussed by the A.S.U.O. Senate. The president of the A.S.U.O. Senate, or his designate, would constitute an additional student representative at the regular faculty meetings and have the right to the floor granted to the two students presently attending the meetings.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Patton reported that the Faculty Senate recommended its adoption, but that he would move an amendment on behalf of the Senate at the proper time. Mr. Robinson spoke to his motion. Mr. Patton then moved to amend by changing the word "d-iscussed" in the first sentence to "acted upon." The motion was seconded. Mr. S. A. Pierson, reporter for the Senate meeting at which Mr. Robinson's motion was reviewed, summarized the Senate discussion of the motion and the amendment.

After discussion, Mr. R. W. Leeper moved to amend by providing that all members of the A.S.U.O. Senate have the privilege of the floor and the right to vote on measures before the faculty. The chairman ruled Mr. Leeper's motion out of order. On an appeal from the ruling of the chair, the chair was sustained.

After further discussion, during which it was pointed out that the Paculty Senate amendment would not prohibit the president of the A.S.U.O. Senate from participating in the discussion of any measure as an individualj the amendment was put to a vote and carried.

Mr. Civin then moved to amend by providing that the chairman of the faculty be required to call on the president of the A.S.U.O. Senate for a report on each measure before the faculty. Mr. Civin's motion was seconded, put to a vote by a show of hands, and carried: yes, 103; no, 61.

Mr. Robert Campbell moved to amend by adding the following sentence: The A.S.U.O. Senate may, through its president or his designate, present notices of motion for faculty action. The motion to amend having been seconded, Mr. Patton reported that the Faculty Senate recommended that it be disapproved.

Mr. Robinson stated that the Student-Faculty Council believed that Mr. Campbell's amendment involved substantive matters not germane to the Council motion. He then suggested that the amendment was out of order. The chairman so ruled; on an appeal from the ruling of the chair, the chair was sustained.

Mr. Rodgers inquired whether--since Mr. J. N. Tattersall had informed the faculty, in a communication circulated through the campus mail on May 1, that this amendment would be presented at the regular May 6 faculty meeting--the proposal could be considered at this meeting as an independent motion. Mr. O. J. Bollis stated that he had been informed by the secretary of the faculty that Mr. Tattersall had told the secretary that he did not consider the communication circulated through the campus mail on May 1 to be a notice of motion under the rules of the faculty. The secretary confirmed Mr. Rollis' statement. The chairman then ruled that the proposal had not had proper notice as an independent motion and therefore could not be considered at this meeting.

Mr. Robinson's motion, as amended, was then put to a vote and carried.

STUDENT CON W CT CODE. Mr. Lacy, chairman of the Student Conduct Committee, moved on behalf of his committee that Sec. I.B.2.; of the Code of Student Conduct be deleted and that the following new section be added:

I.B.3.g. Participation in disruptive activity. Disruptive activities are those which are intended to and do: block access to University buildings or rooms, interrupt or prevent any activity or operation of the University, interfere with any person's rights of free speech or assembly, or violate the confidentiality of records of the University and its members.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Lacy pointed out that the motion originally sponsored by the Student Conduct Committee and reviewed by the Faculty Senate provided for a new Sec, I.B.2.j, replacing the present section having the same number; that both the present and the originally proposed section place participation in disruptive activities within the class of major offenses; but that, after the Senate review, the committee voted to change the number of the proposed section to I.B.3.g, which would place such activities within the class of minor offenses. He stated that he did not agree with this action of the committee, and that, at the proper time, he would move on his own behalf to restore the section number I.B.2.j and the classification of disruptive activities as major offenses.

Mr. Patton reported that the Senate has voted to recommend the adoption of the motion as presented to the Senate, with disruptive activities classified as major offenses; but that, at the proper time, he would move an amendment on behalf of the Senate. Mr, S. B. Greenfield questioned whether the motion, as changed by the Student Conduct Committee, was in order. The chairman ruled that the motion was in order.

Mr. Patton then moved, on behalf of the Senate, to amend by changing the period at the end of the motion to a comma, and by adding the words: "to include failure to comply when directed, by a person with authority to do so, to disperse, to leave a University building, room, or other facility; or to cease the use of loud speakers, amplifiers, or other forms of noise." The motion was seconded.

Mr. Ron Eachus, president of the Associated Students, stated that he had designated Mr. Don Chalmers, a member of the Student Conduct Committee, as the second student entitled to the floor at this meeting, and asked that Mr. Chalmers be recognized to speak against the Senate amendment. After some remarks, Mr. Chalmers stated that he wished to yield the floor to another student member of the committee. The chairman stated that, under the rules of the faculty, two students only have the privilege of the floor at any one faculty meeting, that Mr. Eachus and Mr. Chaimers have already exercised the privilege at this meeting, and that a third student could not be recognized.

A member of the faculty rose to a point of order, suggesting that the Senate amendment involved a substantive matter outside the scope of the princi-pal motion, and was therefore out of order. Mr. uollis called attention to the ruling of the chair that the change of disruptive activity from a major to a minor offense, after notice and after review by the Senate, was in order--and suggested that this provided a precedent for a ruling that the Senate amendment was in order. The chairman ruled the Senate amendment in order.

Mr. Rodgers inquired whether the rule restricting the number of students having the privilege of the floor could be suspended to allow additional students to speak on the motion before the faculty. The chairman stated that the rule could not be suspended, but that the faculty could, if it wished, resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole for more informal discussion.

After further discussion of the Senate amendment, Mr, Bower Aly moved that the principal motion, with its pending amendment, be referred back to the Faculty Senate, with instructions to consider revision of the Senate amendment in the interest of Breater clarity. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

GROUP REQUIREMENT. Mr. J. M. Allman, chairman of the a~d hoe Committee on Undergraduate Education, moved on behalf of his committee that the group requirements be changed to read as follows:

(1) To insure breadth of liberal education, all candidates for a bachelor's degree are required to take work in each of'three groups--arts and letters, social sciences, and science--as listed below, in courses numbered 100-499, exclusive of courses numbered 400-410.

(2) Majors in liberal arts: 18 hours taken in each of the three groups--arts and letters, social science, and science--for a total of 54 hours.

(3) Majors in professional schooIs: 36 total hours in arts and letters, social science, and science. At least 9 hours shall be taken in each of the three groups.

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Arts and Letters Group General Arts and Letters Art: ArR 201,202,203,204,205,206,207,208,209 Classics, and Chinese and Japanese English German and Russian Music: Mus 201,202,203,204,205,206 Philosophy> except courses listed under Social Science Romance Languages Speech Social Science Group General Social Science Anthropology Economics Geography History ' Philosophy, except courses listed under Arts and Letters Political Science Phychology, except courses listed under Science

Religion
Sociology '
, Scienee G
General Science
Biology , -
Chemistry
Computer Science
Geology
Mathematics ' '
Physics

Psychology, except courses listed under Social Science'

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Patton reported that the Faculty Senate recommended its adoption. Mr. Allman spoke to his motion, and Mr. Pierson summarized the Senate discussion, ~ '

After discussion, Mr.'C. R. B. Wright moved to amend by adding to paragraph (13: "and subject to additional'restrictions which may be imposed by the departments involved." The motion to amend was''seconded.

: :.

After discussion of the amendment, Mr. Greenfield moved that the meeging be adjourned. 'The motion was seconded and put to a vote by a show of hands; the result was a tie: yes; 49; no, 49. The chairman cast the deciding vote, foradjournment. '

. . George N. Belknap

Secretary of the Paculty '

June 3, 1970

Tne meeting was called to order by President Clark, The chairman asked if the minutes of the regular meeting on May 6 or the adjourned meeting on May 20, 1970 required any corrections.

Mr. R.S. Freeman pointed out that the NaY 20 minutes included no reference to remarks by Mr. Hans Linde concerning the Faculty Senate amendment to the motion on disruptive activities presented by Mr. F.R. Lacy on behalf of the Student ConJuct Committee. The chairman instructed the secretary to consult with Mr. Linde and add to the minutes whatever reference to these remarks is heeded for the record of the May 20 meeting. (The secretary, after consulting Mr. Linde, has added a sentence to the May 20 m,inutes, following the text of tne Senate amendment: ''Mr. Hans Linde, author of the Senate amendment, explained its intent.',)

Mr. S.A. Bernhard stated that he believed that the seventn paragraph of the section of the M8y 20 minutes reporting consideration of Mr. Lacy's motion, though an accurate report, may suggest a doubtful precedent for future rulings in the conduct of faculty business; his reference was to Mr. O.J. Hollis' defense of the propriety of the Senate amendment to Mr. Lacyis motion. The chairman ruled that the minutes required no correction, but suggested that Mr. Bernhard might, if he wished, request the Faculty Senate to consider the question of precedent.

The chairman then declared the minutes of the May 6 and 20 meetings approved, subject to the addition of a proper reference to Mr. Linde's remarks at the May 20 meeting.

FACULTY SENATE ELECTIONS. The secretary reported that he has been informed that the several minor faculties have elected the following members of the Faculty Senate for two-year terms: Liberal Arts--J.M. Allman, Herbert Bisno, Paul Civin, Bernd Crasemann, Aaron Novick, C.P. Patton, D.G. Starlin, George Streisinger, L.W. Ward. Arc~hitecture and Allied Arts--R.S. Harris. Business Administration-O.S. Tull. Community Service and Public Affairs--W.E. Schafer. Education--C.A. Bowers. Health, Physical -Education, and Recreation--C.M. Reich. Journalism-J.B. Lemert. Law--C.D. Clark. Librarianship--C.W. Hintz. Music--H.R. Saltzman.

FACULTY SENATE BUSINESS. Mr. Hollis, chairman of the Faculty Senate, announced: that the Faculty Senate and the A.S.U.O. Student Senate have established a liaison committee and that the FacUlty Senate has voted to allow student members of the committee the privilege of the floor at meetings of the Faculty Senate; and that the Faculty Senate has, in accordance with faculty legislation, elected the follow= ing University members of the Interinstitutional Faculty Senate of the Oregon State System of Higher Education: Mr. Robert Campbell, Miss Grace Graham, Mr. Hans Linde.

ACADEMIC REGALIA AT COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES. Mr. Fred Mohr, being recognized, stated that he wished to yield the floor to a member of the senior class for a statement concerning the wearing of academic regalia at the 1970 Commencement Exercises. The chairman ruled that the student, under faculty legislation, could not have the privilege of the floor unless designated by the president of the A.S.U.O. as one of two students having the privilege at this meeting. Mr. Ron Eachus, president of the A.S.U.O., indicated that the representateve of the senior class was not so designated. Mr. Mohr then stated that he -has been informed that a poll of the senior class has resulted in a recommendation that members of the graduating class and members of the faculty not wear academic regalia at the 1970 Commencement Exercises, and that each student and faculty member participating in the exercises contribute the rental cost of regalia to causes designated by the class. In the course of his remarks, Mr. Mohr referred to a statement by President Clark in regard to this question. The President explained that, on learning of the recommendation, he informed the Academic Occasions Committee that he believed that Commencement was an important ceremonial occasion of which the wearing of academic regalia was an intrinsic part--though not a requirement for participation. He added that the Academic Occasions Committee endorsed this position, though not by a unanimous vote.

Mr. Bower Aly stated that he belisved there was faculty legislation concerning the wearing of academic regalia by faculty members participating in the exercises, and asked if the secretary had this legislation at hand, The secretary replied that he did not. Mr. Aly than-asked that the-text of the legislation be sent to members of the farulty through the campus mail.

Ad HOC CQMMITTFF ON R.O.T.C. CONTRACTS. Mr. J.T. Gange, chairman of the ad hoc ¢bmmittee to Study R.O.T.C. Contracts, hall6J attention to the fact that his committee's final report has been mailed to~the faculty, and meved that the committee be discharged and its responsibilities be transferred to the standing Advisory R.O.T.C. Committee, established at the May 20 meeting. The motian'was seconded.

Mr. Andrew Thompson qUestioned whether members of the faculty understood what they were voting on when the motion to establich the standing Advisory R.O.T.C. Committee~iw41$ adol~ j~tht~lle M~Y~ Z9~ime~e~ti~g~ and is~gggste¢cth~~~~thP~~^egawl~ttyw`~gif~~jt4;i~ 3~ct,i;oa,,p,l,as~-,~ne~e,,r,tq~3. y,.,.~rp*3,,.lia, ~n,gq ;rW~s~e; ~ awigo,ie*, ,o,/~,,or~det,,~eir~ ~~~ i~~ ~1—ythe ,-~~yT2@;.p~~*4~rc6`,~w,as.~i~,ord~er an~dw lt~e~ committee properly established. The chairman ruled that the procedure was in order and the committee properly established.

After further discussion, Mr. S.S. Tepfer moved the preViOUs quest~on. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried by the required two-thirds majorityS The principal motion was then put to a vote and carried.

REPORT OF STUDENT-FACULTY COUNCIL. Mr. H.W. Robinson, chairman of the StudefitFaculty Council, read a report from the Council, including the following concluding remarks: t.... I am convinced that the body can be an instrUment for resolving many of the problems which confront the University today. However, this cannot be achieved without the full confidence and cooperation of the concerned bodies. The time of a dedicated and responsible group of students and faculty is not being effectively employed. The Student-Faculty Council should be used or discharged.~'

Mr. D.R. Stannard stated that he believed that the Student-Faculty Council has generally taken a narrow and restricted view of its fUnctions, a view not jUstified by the faculty legislation establishing the body, and is therefore largely res-ponsible for its own sense of ineffectiveness. The President stated that he would call the attention of the 1970-71 Council to the provisions of the legislation establishing the body.

LE ROY C. MERRITT MEMORIAL. Mr. P.D. Morrison presented the following memorial:

Dean Merritt was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, September 10, 1912 and died May 22, 1 970.

He worked in the Milwaukee Public Library while taking courses at the University of Wisconsin where he received the B.A. in 1935, with a diploma in librarianship. He received a Ph.D. in librarianship from the University of Chicago in the spring of 1942.

During the Second World War Dr. Merritt was serving as librarian of Longwood College at Farmville, Virginia, when he was drafted and served for two years in the Armed Servicee. Near the close of the European fighting, he was aiding in a 5pecial Services project in Paris for getting books and magazines to men in the front lines.

In 1946 Dean Merritt joined the faculty of the School of Librarianship at the University of California at Berkeley, He served for twenty years, and was vicechairman of the school from 1954 to 1960, then acting dean until 1962. In 1966 he came to head the new School of Librarianship of the University of Oregon. Under his leadership the new school was accredited by the American Library Association in June 1968.

His doctoral dissertation, which was published by the University of Chicago Press in 1943, was entitled The United States Government As Publisher. He wrote a number of survey reports for California public libraries: La Jolla, Arcadia, Hayward, Oakland, Pacific Grove, and Vallejo. In 1951 he was the author of The Use of the Subject Catalog in the University of California Library and, in 1968, Reviews i~n Library Book Selection, co-authored with Boaz and Tisdel. In 1949, he was joint editor of Planning the University Library Building. he is best known for his work on censorship and intello~al freedom. He published many articles in this field and edited the ALA Newsletter On Intellectual Freedom from 1962 until his death. The H.W. Wilson Company has just announced the publication of his book entitled Book Selection and Intellectual Freedom.

He was a past chairman of the California Library Association Intellectual Freedom Committee, a member of the ALA Intellectual Freedom Committee, former president of the Association of American Library Schools, and president-elect of the Library Education Division of the American Library Association.

DUring his teaching career Dean Merritt was especially interested in the COUrSe on "Book Selection," required of all who expected to become librarians. He advocated a definite, written book selection policy for each library, a clearly defined program for meeting the requests and complaints of the reading public, a careful interpretation to the public of soUnd book and magazine selection policies. He believed that one manis prejudices or lack of information should not limit another man's free inquiry. He was known for the witty headings that gave sparkle to the Newsletter On Intellectual Freedom. In 1969 he received the University of Illinois Robert Downs Award for outstanding contributions to the cause of intellectual freedom in libraries.

Dean Merritt was a diligent and rigorous scholar, a very efficient and well-organized administrator, and a k~nd, generous, and understanding man. It is futile for me to try to express how much we miss him.

Mr. Morrison then asked that the memorial be recorded in the minutes of this meeting, and that a copy be transmitted to his family. At the request of the chairman, the faculty rose for a moment of silent tribute to Mr. Merritt.

DISRUPTIVE ACTIVITIES. The secretary read from the minutes of the May 20 faculty meeting passages indicating the present state of consideration of a motion by Mr. Lacy on behalf of the Student Conduct Committee, including:

(1) The text of Mr. Lacy~s motion: That Sec. I.B.2.j. of the Code of Student Conduct be deleted and that the following new section be added:

I.B.3.g. Participation in disruptive activities. Disruptive activities are those which are intended to and do: block access to University buildings or rooms, interrupt or prevent any activity or operation of the Univers~ty, interfere with any person's rights of free speech or assembly, or violate the confidentiality of records of the University and its members.

(2) Mr. Lacy's statement that, after notice of motion and consideration of the proposed new-section by the Faculty Senate as Sec. I.B.2.j, classifying disruptive activities as a maJor offense, his committee had changed the section number to Sec. I.B.3.g, classifying disruptive activities as a minor offense.

(3) The report of the FacUlty Senate recommending the adoption of the motion as presented to the Senate, with disruptive activities classified as a major offense.

. .

(4) The text of a proposed Senate amendment, to change the period at the end of the motion to a comma, and to add the words: to inclUde failure to comply when directed, by a person with authority to do so, to disperse, to leave a University building, room, or other facility; or to cease the use of loud speakers, amplifiers, or other forms of noise.

(5) Action by the faculty to refer the principal motion, with its pending amendment, back to the Senate, with instructions to consider revision of the Senate amendment in the interest of greater clarity.

Mr. C.P. Patton, secretary of the Faculty Senate, then requested permission to withdraw the Senate amendment. Permission being grantedi Mr. Patton moved on behalf of the Senate to substitute the following for Mr. Lacy~s motion and the withdrawn amendment:

. . .

(1) That Sec. I.B.2.j be amended to read: j. Conduct which intentionally obstructs or disrupts tKe Univers~ty functioMs stated in paragraph I.A.3 of the Code of Student C-onduet.

(2) That there be added a new Sec. I.B.3.c to reaJ,¢~.:c. Failure to disperse, to leave a Ugiversity building, -room, or other premises, or to cease the use of loudspeakers, ampltifiers,-or other forms of noise, after being given nctice to do so by a person properly designated and identified as having awthority from the President of the University to give such notice.

(3) That subsequent sections-of I.B.3 be renumbered accordingly.

.. . .

It having been seconded, Mr. F.E. Dart spoke to the motion to substitute. Mr. T.G. Goertzel then moved that parts (1) and (2) of the motion be divided. The motion was seconded, put to a vote by a show of hands, and defeated: yes, 92; no, 102. Mr. Mohr, Mr. D.T. Smith, and Mr. G.W. Struble served as tellers for this and other divisiobs.

Mr. BerNhard rose to a point of orJer, sUggesting that the Senate-substitute motion ~nvolved subs-tantive changes from the Student Conduct Gommittee motion, and -was therefore out of order. The chairman-ruled the Senate motion in order. After extensive discussion, Mr. E.F. Beal inquired whether another motion to divide would be in order. The chairman ruTed that such a motion would not be in order. A member of the faculty moved to delete part (2), which would add a new Sec. I.B. 3.c to the Code of Student Conduct. The motion was seconded. After discussion, Mr. A.F. Moursund moved the previous question on the amendment. ,The motion for the previous guestion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried. The motion to amend was then put to a vote by a show of hands and defeated: yes, 74; no, 124.

Mr. E.A.Cykler then moved the previous question on the motion to substitute; the motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried. The motion to substitute was then put to a vote by a show of hands and carried: yes, 120; no, 74. Mr. Moursund then moved the previous question on the substitute motion, now the principal motion; the motion for the previous question was put to a vote and defeated for lack of a twothirds majority; yes, 121; no, 69.

Mr. A.P. Rubin moved to amend part (1) to read: j. Conduct which intentionaily, directly, and significantly interferes with the University's discharging its responsibilities within the sense of paragraph I.A.3. The mOtiDn was seconded, put to a vote, and defeated.

Mr. Aly moved the previous question on the substitute motion, now the principal motion; the motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried. The principal motion was then put to a vote by a show of hands and carried: yes, 118; no, 69.

ADJOURNMENT. Mr. Struble moved that the meeting be adjourned, subject to the call of the President. The motion was seconded. Mr. J.M. Allman moved to amend to provide that the meeting be adjourned to reconvene at 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday, June lO. The motion to amend was seconded, put to a vote, and carried. The motion as amended was then put to a vote and carried.

George N. Bel knap Secretary of the Faculty ADJOURNED MEETING OF THE FACULTY June l O, 1 97Q

The meeting was called to order by President Clark.

CAMPUS DISORDERS. The President asked unanimous consent to change the order of business to enable him to report to the faculty, at this time, concerning the meeting of the Oregon State Board of Higher Education at La Grande on Tuesday, June 9--with particular reference to the Boardis consideration of recent disruption and violence on State System campuses, which has received wideppread newspaper coverage. No objection was heard.

The President stated that the Board~s consideration opened with a report on recent events presented by the Chancellor, incorporating factual material and recommendations for revision of Board policies and procedures in the light of these events. He also stated that, in his opinion, this was a good report and that neither the report nor the Board's consideration showed any evidence of "witch hunting..' The Board's discussion was open and frank, and revealed differences of opinion concerning proper procedures among members of the Board. Policies approved in principle, subject to redrafting and later presentation for final adoption, incorporated substantial wording drafted by a member of the University of Oregon faculty and recommended by the Chancellor. The President also stated that he had objected to some phrasings of the original draft of the policy statements which he believed in conflict with the basic principles of academic freedom and the traditions of the University of Oregon--and that changes were made in the light of his objections.

WENDELL STEPHENSON MEMORIAL. Mr. T.P. Govan presented the following memorial.

Wendell Holmes Stephenson, teacher, scholar, editor, and professor of history in the University of Oregon since 1953. died at Eugene on April 14, 1970. A native of Indiana and a graduate of Indiana University, he received the doctorate from the University of Michigan in 1928, and before coming to Oregon was a member of the history faculty at the University of Kentucky, Louisiana State University, and Tulane University. As a historian, he was chiefly concerned with the slavery controversy and the ante-bellum South, and made a distinguished contribution throUgh his biographies of James H. Lane, Alexander Porter, and Isaac Franklin, his two volumes of historiographical essays, and his service as co-editor of the ten-volume History of the South and of the Southern Biography Series.

But his colleagues in history throughout the United States gratefully remember him best for his editorship of the Journal of Southero History (1935 to 1941) and of the Mississippi \/alley Historical Review (1946 to 1953), through wliich, with a meticUlous care that extended to the briefest reYiew, he taught a whole generation of historians how to express what they wanted to say. Editing was an act of devotion to the profession, sufficiently important to justify postponement of his own scholarly work, and those who profited from this act of selfless sacrifice too frequently were unaware of the contribution he made--so carefully and modestly did he draw out frpm them the meaning of what they had intended to write, but which, without his aid, they had been unable to state.

They respected and honored him. Three historical societies chose him as president: The Agricultural Historical Association in 1940, the Southern Historical Association in 1944, and the Mississippi Valley Historical Association in 1957. But these honors were not what he valued the most; nor was it his own scholarly work, noC the long hours he patiently spent editing the work of others. He thought of himsilf at being the teacher in the classroom, and in the last five years of his service at this University, when, for reasons of health, he had been forced to renounce almost all activity, he continued his lectures to a large survey course in American history and conducted a colloqudum for undergraduates. His popularity in a time of increasing divergence of views between the generations remained undiminished. He was loved and admired for his gentle, yet forceful, character and manner, and in the final term of last year, though confined to wheelchair in his home as the result of a fall in November 1968, the members of his colloquTum insisted that he permit them to continue to meet.

Students in four institutions for more than forty years, along with his faculty colleagues, were privileged to know and to learn from a great and gentle man. We are grieved, but our grief is lessened, if not taken wholly away, by the memory of the joy he gave throughout his long and val.uable life.

Mr. Govan then moved that the memorial be spread upon the minutes of the faculty and that a copy be sent to the widow of Mr. Stephenson. The faculty then rose for a moment of silent tribute to Mr. Stephenson.

RAYMOND ELLICKSON MEMORIAL. Mr E.G. Ebbighausen presented the following memorial:

Professor Raymond Thorwald Ellickson died Sunday evening May 31 of this year i970 at the age of 60. Ray come to the University of Oregon io 1948 to fill the two positions of associate dean of the Graduate School and head of the Department of Physics. He was born in 1910 on a farm near the small town of CharTson, North Dakota close to the Missouri River. After high school he received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Reed College, the Master of Arts degree from Oregon State University, and in 1938 his doctorate in physics from the Universtly of Chicago.

Ray Ellickson's professional career was quite varied and of the highest quality. After receiving his doctor~s degree he taught for several years at Brooklyn Poytechnic Institute. In 1946 he came to Reed College and became head of their Physics Department and then to the Univesity of Oregon in 1948.

As might be expected of one of Ray~s stature, he was a member of many professional and honorary societies. I am sure that th~s moCtest man was proudest of all of his activities in the American Association of Physics Teachers and his active participation in the high-school and elementary-science teaching programs of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Harvard Project Physics. For, truly, Ray Ellickson was a teacher's teacher and his strenuous, low-keyed efforts in lower-division teaching has been appreciated by many students here and at other school s.

When Ray came to this campus inil948 it became apparent quickly that he was the committee member par excellence. He had an uncanny ability to regard the evidence of a case under consideration, ta distill fr~ it the essence of the problem, and to present his views in succinct and logical terms. For twelve years from ]958 he was the University~s faculty athletic representative and for this contribution he was highly regarded. The present high stature of the Department of Physics owes a great deal to his early tenure as department head from 1948 to 1960 and to his contiouing advice. Although he had not been active in research in recent years, his colleagues highly regarded him for his broad knowledge of physics and related fields. Beyond this his activities in civic affairs contributed a great deal to bridging the gap between town and gown.

.

As a social person he was a delight to all. An evening at the Ellickson home with Ray and his charming wife Loene was always a delightful experience and one to be remembered. His fund of stories of his own eXperiences was seemingly unlimited and highly entertaining. He liked people and this was reciprocated by his many

Ray Ellickson will not be forgotten and our memory of him will endure. He was not an island but a part of the main and because of his departUre we are all the less for it.

Mr. Ebbighausen then moved that the memorial be recorded in the minutes of the faculty and that a copy be sent to Mr. Ellickson's family. The faculty then rose for a moment of silent tribute to Mr. Ellickson.

GROUP REQUIREMENT. The secretary read from the minutes of the May 20, 1970 meeting of the faculty the record showing the present state of the consideration of a motion concerning the group requirement, including:

(1) The text of the motion,'by Mr. J.M. Allman, chairman of'the-ad hoc Committee on Undergraduate Education, on behalf of his con~nittee:

(a) To insure breadth of liberal education, all candidates for a bechelor's degree are required to take work in each of three groups--arts and letters, social sciences, and science--as listed below, in courses numbered 100-499, exclusive of courses numbered 400-41 0.

(b) Majors in liberal arts: 18 hours taken in each of the three groups--arts and letters, social science, and science--for a total of 54 hours.

(c) Majors in professional schools: 36 total hours in arts and letters, social sc~ence, and science. At least 9 hours shall be taken in each of the three groups.

Arts and Letters Group

General Arts and Letters Art: ArH 201,202,203,204,205,206,207,208,209 Classics, and Chinese and Japanese English German and Russian Music: Mus 201,202,203,204,205,206 Philosophy, except courses listed under Social Science Romance Languages Speech

Social Science Group

General Social Science Anthropol ogy Economics Geography History Philosophy, except courses listed under Arts and Letters Politi cal Science Psychology, except courses listed under Science Rel igion Sociology

Science Group

3eneral Science Biol ogy rhemistry 30mputer Science aeol ogy vlathematics 'hysics 'sychology, except courses listed under Social Science

22) The recommendation of the Faculty Senate that the motion be adopted.

3) A pending amendr8~~t by Mr. C.R.B. Wright to add the following to paragraph (a): ~and subject to additional restrictions which may be inposed by the departments nvolved."

Mr. Wright, be~gg recognized, requested permission to change his amendment to read: "Each liberal arts department listed below shal1 designate for the Catalog and Time Schedule which of ;ts courses may not be used to meet these g-eneral education re quirements." With the consent of Mr. Wright's second, permission was granted.

Mr. Jean Oliver, representative of the A.S.U.O. Senate at this meeting, reported that the A.S.U.O. Senate recommended the adoption of Mr. Allman's motion in its original form.

After discussion, Mr. Wright's motion to amend was put to a vote by a show of hands and defeated: yes, 54; no, 118. Mr. R.L. Bowlin, Mr. Fred MOhr, and Mr. D.T. Smith served as tellers for this and other divisions.

Mr. S.B. Greenfield moved to substitUte the following for paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) of Nr. Allman's motion:

To insure a certain breadth of l`~beral education, all candidates for a bachelor's degree must take work in each of three groups (arts and letters, social sciences, and science, as listed below), with specific requirements as follows:

(a) Each student must complete a year sequence (in courses carrying 3, 4, or 5 hours credit) on the 100, 200, or 300 level in each of the three groups.

(b) Each student must take three additional term courses (of 3, 4, or 5 hours credit), either in or without sequence, from any courses numbered 100-499, exclusive of courses numbered 400-410, from one or more of the three groups.

(c) No course in student's major shall satisfy the requirements in (a) and (b) above.

Mr. Greenfield's motion was seconded and, after discussion, put to a vote and defeated.

Mr. S.S. Tepfer moved to amend by changing the words in paragraph (b) of Mr. Allman's motion, "18 hours taken in each of the three groups. . .for a total of 54 hours: to "six courses of at least 3 hours each in each of the three groups . . .for a total of at least 54 hours"; and by changing the words in paragraphi(c), "36 total hours in arts and letters, social science, and science"-to "twelve courses of at least 3 hours each in arts and letters, social sciences, and science." Mr. Tepfer's motion was seconded, put to a vote by a show of hands, and carried: yes, 98; no, 81.

Mr. F.W. Anderson moved to amend by providing that not more than four courses offered for the satisfaction of the group requirement may be in any one department. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and defeated.

Mr. V.R. Lorwin moved t,o amend by changing the word "insure" in paragraph (a) to "promote." The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

Mr. M.D. Ross moved to amend by changing the line in the Arts and Letters group list, "Art: ArH 201,202,203,204,205,206,207,208,209," to "Art History." The motion was seconded. Mr. O.J. Hollis rose to a point of order, suggesting that the extension of the group lists beyond the provisions of Mr. Allman's motion in the field of art or any other field, by amendment without notice, was out of order. The chairman ruled that Mr. Ross's motion was out of order.

A member of the faGulty moved the previous question on Mr. Allman's motion, as amended; the motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried. The principal motion, as amended, was then put to a vote and carried.

GRADING SYSTEM. Mr. L.L. Lovell, chairman of the ad hoc Committee on the Grading System, moved on behalf of his committee the adoption of the following motion:

(1) Beginning fall term, 1970' the following grades will be used at the University of Oregon:

Pass-differentiated: A--excellent; B--good; C--satisfactory performance.

Pass-undifferentiated: P--satisfactory performance. (Satisfactory performance means a leve] of performance which, if achieved in all of the student's work, should qUalify him for a University undergraduate degree.)

No credit: N--unsatisfactory performance.

. Incomplete: I. (When the quality of work is satisfactory, but some minor yet essent~al requirement of the course has not yet been completed, for reasons acceptable to the instructor, a report of I may be made and additional time granted for completion of the work.)

X--No grade reported by the instructor.

Y--No basis for grade.

(2) The minimUm University credits for an Undergraduate degree will be 186 hours of satisfactory work, appropriately distributed as to group requirementsj major field, and other University requirements. A minimUm of 45 hours of passdifferentiated work must be taken in residence. There is no grade-point average requirement for graduation. Instead, 85 per csut of all work completed at the University of Oregon mUSt be passed satisfactorily.

(3) Academic probation and suspension for undergraduate students are defined as follows: Students in the following categories of accumulated credit hours will be subject tb academic probation or academic suspension upon accumUlating the indcated; number of N h3urs (for administrative reasons, the count of cumulative N grades will begin with the fall term, 1969; F grades will be counted as N grades).

CredOt hours Probation Suspe5sion

45-89 1 8 21 90-1 34 24 27 l35_ + 25 28

The Scholastic Deficiency Committee will establish the conditions, in individual cases, for removal from probationary status and for readmission to the UniversiFty.

(4) Students registered prior to the fall term, 1970 may graduate under the grading system operative through summer session, 1970 by notification of such intention at the time of their next registration at the University of Oregon.

(5) Students with credits from other institutions must transfer ~th their passing and failing grades in all courses.

(6) No coUrse open to undergraduate students may be offered on a pass-differentiated grading basis only. Individual students may be required to take such courses on a pass-differentiated basis, as may be specified in paragraph (7).

(7) Each degree-granting program will speGify and publish in the University Catalog all requirements for a major in its field, and will make available such a list of specifications to any student requesting it.

(8) A student may change his grading option through the sixth week of any term. This change will then be binding upon both student and instructor.

(9) For the convenience of students desiring such information, the Registrar will record the following numerical eqUivalents with pass-differentiated grades: A--4; B--3; C--2.

(lO) An ad hoc committee will be appointed annually, for at least five years, to study the effects and consequences of the new grading system. The committee will report its findings and recommendations for change to the faculty.

(11) The provisions of this motion supersede all previous Llolversity legislation on the grading system.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. C.P. Patton, secretary of the Faculty Senate, reported that, at the proper time, he would move several amendments on behalf of the Senate; he also reported that the Senate recommended that the principal motion, with or without these amendments, be disapproved. Mr. Lovell spoke to his motion and Mr. S.A. Pierson, Senate reporter, summarized the Senate discussion.

Mr. Patton then moved, on behalf of the Senate, to amend by changing the second sentence of Sec. 2, ''A minimum of 45 hours of pass-differentiated work must be taken in residence," to read: "minimum of 90 hours must be earned on a passdifferentiated basis, of which a minimum of 45 hoUrs mUst be earned in residence." The motion to amend was seconded.

pr.;Ol;iver reponted that the A-;5.U.0.~9el3ate recommended the adoption of the principal motion as presented by Mr. Lovell. Mr. J.W. Crawford moved to table the principal motion, with its pending amendment, until the first fall 1970 meeting of the faculty; the motion to table was seconded, put to a vote by a show of hands, and defeated: yes, 46; no, 99.

Mr. B.N. Siegel asked whether it woUld be parliamentarily possible to present an amendment of broader scope which would, in part, relate to the subject of the Senate amendment. The chairman suggested that, to bring this question before the faculty, he present his proposal as a substitute for the Senate amendment. Mr. Siegel then moved, as a substitute for the Senate amendment:

(1) That Sec. 1 of the principal motion be amended by changing the grade designatio~ "C" to "P"; and by deleting the words: "Pass-undifferentiated: P--satisfactory performance."

(2) That Sec.~2 be amended by deleting the sentence: "A minimum of 45 hours of pass differentiated work must be taken in residence."

(3) That Secs. 6, 7, and 8 be deleted.

(4) That the grade designation t'C" in Sec. 9 be changed to "P."

Mr. J.R. Menninger inquired whether Mr. Siegel's motion was in order. At the chairman's request, Mr. Hollis commented on this point. He stated that he believed that Nr. Siegelis motion was out of order, since it wouid radically change, without notice, the meaning of the mark of "P" in existing faculty legislation, and place the mark of "P" as one step in a graduated scale of pass-differentiated grades, and do away with longstanding concept of "P" as an alternative to a scale of grades. The chairman ruled Mr. Siegel~s motion out of order.

Mr. Bower Aly moved that further consideration of Mr. Lovell's motion and its pending amendment be postponed until the October 1970 meeting. Mr. Hans Linde inquired whether Mr. Aly would be willing to add to his motion a request that, in the interim, departments stydy the impact of the proposal on their programs and report their conclusions. Mr. Aly accepted this addition. The motion was seconded.

Mr. Franklin Lowenthal moved to amend Mr. Aly's amendment to provide for postponement until the November 1970 faculty meeting; the motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried. Mr. Aly's motion, as amended, was then put to a vote by a show of hands and defeated: yes, 76; no, 80.

After further discussion, Mr. Patton's amendment, on behalf of the Senate, was put to a vote by a show of hands and carried: yes, 83; no, 65.

Mr. Patton then moved, on behalf of the Senate, to amend Mr. Lovell's motdon by deleting Sec. 6. The motion was seconded and, after discussion, put to a vote by a show of hands and defeated: yes, 64; no' 79.

Mr. Patton then moved, on behalf of the Senate, to amend by deleting Sec.-11. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

Mr. K.W. Porter moved to amend by changing the definition of a '!C" grade in Sec. 1 from "satisfactory performance" to "passing." The motion was seconded, put to a vote qn4 defeated.

Mr. George Streisinger moved the previous question on the principal motion as amended. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and defeated.

Mr. Aly moved that the principal motion as amended, together with Mr. Siegel's proposal, be referred to the Faculty Senate for further study, with instructions

-to report to the faculty not later than the November 1970 meeting. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and defeated. ~ -

A member of the faculty moved to amend the last sentence of Sec. 2 of Mr. Lovell's motion to read: "Instead, 85 per cent of all work graded A, B, C, P, or N completed at the University of Oregon must be passed satisfactorily'/" The motion was seconded. Mr. A.P. Rubin moved to amend the amendment by adding the marks I, X, and Y; the mption was seconded, put to a vote, and defeated. Mr. Lowenthal moved to amend the amendment by adding the marks I and Y; the motion was seconded, put to a vote, and defeated. The original amendment was then put to a vote and carried.

A member of the faculty moved that the meeting be adjourned. The motion was seconded, pUt to ~ vote, and defeated.

After fUrther discUssion, a member of the facUlty moved the previous question on Mr. Lovell's motion as amended; the motion was seconded, put to a vote by a show of hands, and carried: yes, 108; no, 26. The principal motion, as amended, was then put to a vote by a show of hands and carried: yes, 96; no, 51.

ADJOURNMENT. A member of the facUlty moved that the meeting be adjo-urned. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

George N. Belknap Secretary of the Faculty



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