This File has been scanned, converted to a TIFF file, an OCR program has been run, and then the file converted to HTML. Any errors are regretted and should be reported to Ekaterina Puffini (ekaterinapuffin@yahoo.com)

PRELIMINARY DOCUMENT - WORK IN PROGRESS UNCORRECTED AND UNEDITED. NOT NORMATIVE

REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY October 2, 1968

The meeting was called to order by Acting President Johnson.

INTRODUCTIONS. Ninety-one new faculty members and twenty-seven members returning from leaves were introduced by deans and division heads.

MINUTES OF MEETING OF JUNE 5-6, 1968. The minutes sf the meeting of June 5-6, 1968 were approved.

COMMITTEE REPORTS. Reports were presented by Mr. C. D. Clark, ebairman of the Presidential Sesrch Committee, Mr. J. L. Hulteng, chairman of the Advisory Council, Mr. R. E. Montgomery, chairman of the ad hoc Committee on Foreign Study Programs, and Mr. J. C. Sherwood, chairman of the Committee on the Curriculum. Mr. M. D. Girardeau, chairman of the Committee on Federal Aid and Academic Freedom, stated that a written report from his committee would be distributed to the faculty in the near future. The report from the Committee on the Curriculum was concerned with steps taken, under the leadership of the committee, in the development of instruction for disadvantaged students.

IDENTIPICATION OF PARTICIPANTS IN DISCUSSION. The chairman reminded the faeulty that, under established custom; any person rising to participate in the consideration of any business should first state his name and department.

VOTING FACULTY. The secretary read the definition of the voting faculty of the University, as follows: The voting faculty includes (1) all persons holding, in the University, the academic rank of professor, associate professor, or assistant professor; and (2) persons holding the academic rank of instructor or senior instructor who are employed in the full-time teaching of courses, giving instruction exclusively in schools, colleges, and tepartments that offer work for University credit. Persons with "visiting" or .'emeritus" status have been ruled to be voting members, if otherwise eligible.

PATENT POLICY. The chairman stated that the minutes of the June 1968 faculty meeting show that Mr. H. W. Lefevre moved the adoption of a resolution on patent policy recorded in the minutes, that the motion was seconded, that the secretary of the Faculty Senate reported that the Senate recommended its adoption, and that, after discussion, further consideration was postponed, on motion, until the Oetober 1968 meeting. He stated, further, that Mr. Lefevre is not now on campus and that sponsorship of the resolution has been assumed by Mr. V^. C. Boekelheide.

Mr. Boekelheide, being recognized, moved to refer the question raised regarding patent policy by Mr. Lefevre to the Patent Policy Committee with the request that' (a) they re-examine our present policy and proceed to develop what they would consider a good patent policy both for the faculty of the University and the state of Oregon, (b) they report their recommendations to the faculty through the Faculty Senate this academic year; (c) they make no requests for signing patent-policy agreements during this. period of consideration, although voluntary submissals may be accepted. The motion to refer having been seconded, Mr. W. M. Basye, secretary of the Faculty Senate, reported that the Senate recommended its approval.

The chairman announced that Mr. D. A. Baerncopf would serve as Senate reporter at this meeting. In the course of the meeting, Mr. Baerncopf summarized the principal considerations involved in the Senate discussion of this and other motions concerning which Senate recommendations were reported.

Mr. L. R. Rlemm rose to speak concerning the substance of Nr. Lefevre's motion. The chairman ruled that the discussion must be directed to Mr. Boekelheide's motion to refer.

.

After further discussion, the motion to refer was put to a vote and earried.

ALY-HOVET RESOLUTIONS. The ehairman reported that he had been informed by Mr. Bower Aly and Mr. Thomas Hovet that they would not present resolutions, notices of which they gave at the June 1968 faculty meeting.

OPEN FACULTY MEETINGS. The ehairman stated that Mr. Robert Campbell, who gave notiee of a motion to open faeulty meetings to the publie at the June 1968 meeting, is not now on eampus and that sponsorship of the motion has been assumed by Mr. J. N. Tattersall. Mr. Tattersall, being recognized, moved that the regular monthly meetings of the University of Oregon faculty be open to the public and that arrangements be made to provide a gallery for visitors, insofar as the facilities of the regular meeting room of the faenlty permit.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Basye reported that the Faeulty Senate recommended its adoption, but that he would move an amendment on behalf of the Senate at the proper time. Following an opening statement by Mr. Tattersall, Mr. Basye moved to amend by adding the following words after the word "publie": "as observers and not as participants." The motion was seconded.

Mr. W. H. Parks moved to amend Mr. Basye's motion by deleting the words "and not as participants." Mr. Parks' motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

Mr. J. F. Gange r~ose to move another amendment to the principal motion. The chairman ruled that Mr. Gange's motion was out of order at the present time, since Mr. Basye's motion was the business nov before the faculty. Mr. Basye's motion, as amended, was then put to a vote and carried.

Mr. Gange then moved to amend the principal motion by adding the following: The faculty resolves further that, since many faculty, students, and local citizens are not able to attend the monthly faculty meetings, these meetings be televised for later presentation on campus PL 3 and any local TV statLon that wishes to carry this program as a part of its public service function. The motion was seconded.

Mr. O. J. Hollis rose to a point of order, suggesting that Mr. Gange's amendment was not germane to the principal motion, that it involved new policy questions and problems that had not been considered by the Faculty Senate, and that- it was therefore out of order. The chairman stated that Mr. Hollis' point was well taken' and ruled Mr. Gange's motion out of order.

Mr. Gange rose to question the ruling. Mr. L. E. Ward rose to a point of order, suggesting that, the ruling having been made, it was not subject to debate; but that Mr. Gange could, if he wished, appeal from the ruling of the chaLr. Mr. Gange stated that he would not appeal. Mr. Hollis suggested that Mr. Gange could bring his proposal before the faculty at the November 1968 e eting through notice of motion. Mr. Gange indicated that he would give notice of motion at the proper time.

Mr. A. J. Rubin inquired whether, if Mr, Tattersall's motion carried, the chairman would have the power, in case of disorder in the gallery, to clear the room of disorder}y persons, declare a meeting in executive session, with all nonmembers excluded, or declare a meeting adjourned.

At the chairman's request, Mr. Hollis gave his opinion concerning these parliamentary questions under Robert's Rules of Order which, in the absence of special standing rules adopted by the faculty, governs its deliberations. He stated:

(1) That the chairman could not declare a meeting to be in executive session; but that, if Mr. Tattersall's motion is adopted, the faculty could, by majority vote, suspend for any single session the standing rule provided by the motion and declare itself in executive session with all nonmembers excluded.

(2) That the chairman could not adjourn a a eting, but that a meeting could be adjourned at any time by majority vote of the faculty.

(3) That the chairman has the responsibility and power to maintain order, including the power to require a disorderly person to leave--whether a spectator or a member of the faculty.

Mr. Hollis also pointed out that, if Mr. Tattersall's motion is adopted, there will be three categories of persons in the meeting room: (a) members of the public; (b) members of the faculty, (c) as a special category under existing faculty legislation, the president of the Associated Students and one additional student designated by the A.S.U.O. president, who have the privilege of the floor in the discussion of matters before the faculty.

Mr. Rubin moved to amend the principal motion by adding the following: Provided that the chairman is authorized to declare a faculty meeting adjourned or in executive session without a vote of the faculty when, in his judgment, the actions of observers make the further progress of the meeting unduly difficult. The motion was seconded.

Mr. Aly moved that the principal motion, with adopted and pending amendments, be referred to a special committee of lawyers -- Mr. Nollis, Mr. Basye, and Mr. Rubin -- for further consideration and report. The motion was seconded.

Mr. C, A. Leistner moved the previous question on all pending measures, including Mr. Aly's motion to refer, Mr. Rubin~s motion to amend, and the principal motion as amended. The motion ior the previous question having been seconded, the chairman stated that it was undebatable and would require a two-thirds majority for adoption. The motion was then put to a vote and carried.

Mr. Aly's motion was put to a vote and defeated. Mr. Rubin's motion was put to a voice vote and declared defeated by the chairman; a division being called for, the motion was put to a standing vote and defeated: yes; 78; no, 115. Mr. C. L. Constance, Mr. Fred Mohr, and Mr. George Struble served as tellers. The prineipal motLon, as amended, was then put to a vote and carried.

POLICY CONCERNING PERSONS REFUSING SELECTIVE-SERVICE INDUCTION. Mr. S. B. Greenfield asked that his notice of motion for a resolution concerning personnel-action policy in regard to persons refusing selective-service on grounds of conscience, given through the campus mail on September 11, 1968, be held over to the November 1968 faculty meeting. The chairman granted the request.

AD HOC COMMITTEE ON STUDENT CONDUCT CODE. Mr. W. T. Simpson, chairman of the ad hoc Committee on the Student Conduct Code, moved on behalf of his committee that the makaup of the ad hoc Committee on the Student Conduct Code be modified to include three additional student members, thus to have five student members and five faculty members. The motion having been seconded, Mr. Basye reported that the Faculty Senate recommended its adoption. The motion was then put to a vote and carried.

COMMUNICATION FROM SONS OF LIBERTY. Mr. Basye moved, on behalf of the Faculty Senate, that a communication addressed to the faculty from an organization known as the Sons of Liberty, be referred to the StudentFaculty Council. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

VOTING STATUS OF SENIOR INSTRUCTORS. Mr. C. P. Patton gave notice that he would move, at the November 1968 faculty meeting, that legislation of March 6, 1968 be amended to provide that all persons with the rank of senior instructor be included in the voting membership of the faculty.

TV BROADCASTING OF FACULTY MEETINGS. The question was raised whether Mr. Cange had formally given notice of motion for the TV broadcasting of faculty meetings. Mr. Gange having left the meeting, the chairman instructed the secretary to record the notice in the minutes of this meeting if he learned, on inquiry, that Mr. Gange intended to give notice (on inquiry, the secretary learned that this was his intent}; for the text of the motion, see page 2, where it is recorded as a proposed amendment to Mr. Tattersall's motion for open faculty meetings.

STATE OF TNE UNIVERSITY. Acting President Johnson reported on a policy change in regard to faculty salary payments, and replied to questions from the floor. Ne also announced that he has added two faculty members, representing the Advisory Council and the Faculty Senate, to the University Budget Committee; the members, selected by the respective bodies, are Mr. Patton (Advisory Gouncil) and Mr. Hollis (Faculty Senate).

Mr. Hollis moved that the meeting be adjourned. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

George N. Belknap Secretary of the Faculty

REGULAR MEETING OF TRE FACULTY November 6, 1968

The meeting was called to order by Acting President Johnson.

OPEN FACULTY MEETINGS. The chairman reminded the faculty that, in accordance with action at the October 2, lg68 meeting, regular meetings of the University faculty are now open to the public, and announced that, in accordance with this legislation, arrangements have been made "to provide a gallery for visitors, insofar as the facilities of the regular meeting room of the faculty permit." He also announced that the following seatingrules have been drafted by the officers of the faculty to implement the October 1968 legislation:

(1) The visitors gallery will consist of the section in the rear of 150 Science Building, south of the east-west aisle. A11 visitors should be seated in this section, with the following exceptions: (a) the president of the Associated Seudents and one additional student, who are authorized to attend faculty meetings with the privilege of the floor; (b) representatives of communication agencies.

(2) Members of the facultg should not be seated in the visitors gallery.

The chairman added that, in case of standing votes, the tellers will be instructed to count only votes by persons in the faculty section.

MINUTES OF OCTOBER 2, 1968. The minutes of the October 2, 1968 meeting of the faculty were approved.

FACULTY SENATE ELECTIONS. The secretary reported that Mr. V. R. Lorwin and 21r. Paul Rleinsorge have been elected members of the Faculty Senate by the general faculty, to fill the unexpired portions of the terms of Mr. E. R. Bingham and Mr. L. W. Staples who are on leave during 1968-69 and have resigned their Senate membership; and that Mr. R. S. Harris has been elected by the minor faculty of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts to serve a two-year term as member of the Faculty Senate.

JOINT MEETING OF FACULTY SENATE AND STUDENT SENATE. Mr. O. J. Hollis, chairman of the Faculty Senate, reported on a joint meeting of the Faculty Senate and the Student Senate, held on October 23, 1968 in accordance with action of the faculty at its June 5-6, 1968 meeting. He also reported that a joint committee of the Faculty Senate and the Advisory Council has been established for further consideration of the question of student participation in determination of academic policies.

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON TRE CURRICULUM. Mr. W. M. Basye, secretary of the Faculty Senate, moved on behalf of the Senate the approval of recommendations of the Committee on the Curriculum concerning major undergraduate programs in the School of Community Service and Public Affairs, contained in a report of the committee dated October 30, 1968 (a copy of this report, which had been distributed to the faculty through the campus mail, is filed in the office of the secretary of the faculty as a part of these minutes). The motion was seconded. Mr. J. C. Sherwood, chairman of the Committee on the Curriculum, and Mr. N. D. Sundberg, dean of the school, made general comments on the recommendations.

The chairman stated that, to insure orderly consideration, he would present each of the four ma jor programs recommended -- Community Service, Public Affairs and Administration, International Development, Leisure and Cultural Services Administration -- for separate discussion, and that, as each of the programs was before the faculty, debate, questions, and amendments concerning the program would be in order.

While the major program in Leisure and Cultural Services Administration was before the faculty, Mr. N. D. Ross moved to delete "co~bmunity arts ad=inistration" from the lists of fields in which specialized professional [REMARK PAGE 244 of the ASSEMBLY MINUTES IS BLANK. NO INFORMATION SEEMS TO BE MISSING] instruction would be offered. The motion to amend was seconded. Mr. Sherwood suggested that, in lieu of Mr. Ross's amendment, the phrase "community arts administration" might be changed to "cultural services administration." Mr. Sundberg stated,that this change would be acceptable to the School of Community Service and Public Affairs. Mr. Ross accepted the change and withdrew his amendment, with the consent of his second.

.

After further discussion, Mr. F. C. Andrews moved to amend by deleting "community recreation services" from the list of Leisure and Cultural Services Administration fields. The motion to amend was seconded. Mr. George Struble suggested that the question of specialized professional instruction in "community recreation services: be referred back to the Committee on the Curriculum, with instructions to consider the transfer of the existing major programs offered by the Department of Recreation and Park Management of the School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation to the School of Community Service and PublLc Affairs. Mr. Andrews stated that he would accept this proposal in lieu of his amendment.

The chairman pointed out that, while the substance of instructional programs falls within the jurisdiction of the faculty, the location of responsibility for such programs within the school and departmental structure of the University is a matter for administrative decision; and that any action by the faculey concerning the transfer suggested by Mr. Struble could be only a recommendation to the University administration. Mr. Andrews withdrew his acceptance of Mr. Struble's suggested substitute.

At the chairman's invitation, Mr. S. A. Pierson, Faculty Senate reporter at this meeting, summarized the Senate discussion of the proposed major program in Leisure and Cultural Services Administration.

After further discussion, Mr. Andrews. motion to amend by deleting "community recreation services" from the list of Leisure and Cultural Services Adn~nistration fields was put to a vote and defeated. The principal motion, for the approval of the recommendations of the Committee on the Curriculum, as modified by the change in wording suggested by Mr. Sherwood and - accepted by Mr. Sundberg and Mr. Ross, was then put to a vote and carried.

GROUP REpUIREMENT. Mr. R. E. Montgomery, chairman of the Academic Requirements Committee, reported that his committee, on instructions from the faculty at its June 5-6, 1968 meeting, had made a preliminary study of a motion by Mr. P. E. Simonds for a revision of the group requirement, and outlined some of the complex problems presented by this motion. He then moved, on behalf of his committee, that:

(1) Since the study and revision of the group requirement is a large and complex task, further faculty action be suspended on the Simonds' motion and any other motion concerning the group requirement until an appropriate group can be established to make an investigation and report its finding to the faculty. -

(2) A special ad hoc committee be created to study the group requirement. (a) Its purpose shall be to undertake a study in depeb and to report to the faculty at the earliest convenience. (b) The committee shall consist of five members appointed by the President of the University. (c) The committee shall consist of two faculty members from the College of Liberal Arts, one from the professional schools and colleges, and two students from the general student body. (d) It is recommended that this committee seek the counsel of faculty members and committees that deal with the group requirement, such as the Student-Faculty Council and committees on Advising, Admissions Policy, CurrLculum, and Academic Requirements.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Basye reported that the Faculty Senate recommended its adoption.

Mr! Ross moved to amend by changing the number of members specified in Sec. (2) (b) from five to six and changing the number of members from the faculties of the professional schools and colleges specified in Sec. (2) (c) from one to two. The motion to amend was seconded.
Mr. E. A. Maier suggested an amendment to Mr. Ross's amendment, to strike Sec. (2) (c),-leaving the question of the distribution of faculty members on the committee and the inclusion of student members to the judgment of the President. The chairman informed the faculty that he has recently received communications from the Associated Students urging that the President of the University has authority to appoint student members to several facultyestablished committees where student members are not specifically authorized in faculty legislation, and citing as the ground for this authority recurring words in the November 1965 edition of the "Faculty and Administrative Committee" handbook compiled by the secretary of the faculty: "Membership not fixed by legislation." The chairman stated that he has informed the student officers that he does not agree with their interpre~tion of these words, that the intent is clearly to indicate only that the number of members is not specified in faculty legislation, and that he cannot assume a faculty intent to authorize student members on faculty-established committees unless this intent is specifically indicated in faculty legislation.

Mr. L. E. Ward inquired whether Mr. Ross would accept, in lieu of his amendment, a motion to strike Sec. (2) and (c) and substitute the following: The committee shall be appointed by the President of the University and shall include student members. Mr. Ross stated that he would not accept this suggestion.

Mr. A. P. Moursund moved to amend Nr. Ross's amendment to provide that the committee shall be made up of seven faculty members appointed by the President of the University, Mr. Moursund's motion was seconded, put to a vote and de£eated.

Mr. K. W. Porter moved to amend Mr. Ross's amendment by changing the total number of members to seven and providing that three members shall be from the faculty of the College of Liberal Arts. Mr. Ross stated tbat he would accept these changes in his motion to amend. The proposed changes having been accepted by Mr. Ross, Mr. Porter withdrew his motion.

Mr. Aaron Novick moved to amend Mr. Ross's amendment, as modified, to provide that the committee shall include five student members. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and defeated.

Mr. Ross's amendment, as modified by the acceptance of Mr. Porter's proposal, was then put to a vote, and carried. The principal motion, as amended -- providing for seven members, including three faculty members from the College of Liberal Arts, two faculty members from the professional schools and colleges, and two student members -- was then put to a vote and carried.

SVENDSEN MEMORIAL. Mr. Waldo McNeir read the following memorial for the late Mr. Kester Svendsen, professor of English and head of the Department of English:

When Kester Svendsen came to Oregon in 1959 with a mandate to strengthen this university's English Department and develop a graduate program, he was an established scholar and a master teacher but an unproven administrator. In less than a decade before his death at the age of fifty-six on October 5th of this year, the department under his leadership had achieved national stature. Personified in him and held in exemplary balance were the traditional humanism and the innovative progressivism which he sought as ideals of English study.

He took his baccalaureate at the College of Charleston in South Carolina, where he was born and brought up. His accent invariably betrayed his southern origin. In 1935 he came to the University of North Carolina as a raw recruit. Five years later he had earned both M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. While he was acquiring intellectual discipline from a galaxy of professors, he was imparting it to his own freshmen and sophomore students. In an antediluvian rating of their teachers by students at Chapel Hill, he received a grade of A plus. His rating as a teacher was never any lower throughout his career. He consciously emulated a much-admired professor, the Sbakespeare and Nilton scholar, George Coffin Taylor, who was brilliane in the classroom. Eventually he surpassed his mentor in scholarly accomplishment and classroom virtuosity. Under Taylor's direction he wrote a dissertatLon on Milton. Fifteen years later, honed and polished, this was published as Milton and Science. In it he spplied hard-won factual knowledge in the history of ideas to the sensitive interpretation of a great poet, so that his readers came to see with the new eyes he gave them. Everything he wrote, everything he taughe, combined industry with insight. Thus he learned early and continued to demonstrate the vital relation of scholarship and teaching.

At the University of Oklahoma he became a professor at thirty-seven, and at forty-four the youngest David Ross Boyd Distinguished Professor ever appointed in that institution. A prize for excellence in teaching, a popular radio and later television program on which he read and discussed poetry -- forerunners of the award-winning "The Poet's Eye" on National Educational Television, many contributions to the study of Milton and seventeenth-century English literature, papers read at regional and national meetings, service as adviser to educational associations, learned journals, and university presses -- these brought wide recogaition and further honors. Perhaps paradoxically, his increasing eminence was accompanied by increasing informality of language and manner. From the beginning he was inclined to bluntness, and with maturity came an urbane wit, en30yment of bawdry, and distrust of those Milton calls "Budge doctors of the Stoic fur." Never would he 30in that guild. In Pro Se Defensio, a work he was latter to issue in a formidable edition, Milton describes him as well as himself when he would "chbose rather to be plain-spoken . . . than delicate," and would align himself with those who "intermix, on diverse occasions, words more than indelicate indeed, and subjects abundantly gross, with matters of greater seriousness."

In the 1950s he made steady advances, for his questing spirit was not content with past laurels. He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of the Arts. In 1957-58 he was president of the South-Central Renaissance Conference, and in 1963-64 he was president of the Pacific Northwest Renaissance Conference. Nobody else has ever been president of two regional afftliates of the Renaissance Society of America. Twice he was a visiting professor at the University of North Carolina, and once at the University of Texas. He held research fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, £he Guggenheim Foundation, the Runtington Library, and the Folger Shakespeare Library, At the research centers in San Marino and Washington he is remembered not only as a dedicated investigator in dusty tomes, but also as bon vivant, reciter of limericks, epicure of pretty women, and teller of 30kes about everything -- Lncluding himself. Re believed what Plato says in the Philebus abo~t the usefulness of a 3est to relieve earnest. His life style anticipated the current phenomemon of student revolt, in the sense that he showed scant respect for the establishment of which he was very much a part, and with which after he came to Oregon as a department head he was more closely identified without altering his irreverent attitude toward it. Popularity with students or colleagues was not his aim. Ne offended a few self-important people with his deflating wit; he intrigued multitudes with his caustic observations concerning academic smog. Professional 3argon, woolly words, and fuzzy ideas were repellent to him.

What Oregon got, then, was an individualist not of the common mold, one who for a long time had been free of cant, hipocrisy, and pretentiousness of every kind, a fine scholar and great teacher, but an unknown quantity as an administrator. Naturally, he continued to publish and accumulate kudos. ChaEacteristically, he wore his honors lightly. Nis address as president of the Milton Society in 1966 was both learned and entertaining. But his chief work now was administration. In meeting this last challenge with inimitable style and flair, he safely negotLated .'Rocks whereon greatest men have oftest wrecked," he went his way "though all the winds of doctrine were let loose to play upon the earth," he knew no "fear of change (that) PerpIexes monarchs," he put his seal on the English Department -"implied Subjection, but required with gentle sway," for he knew that '\,ho overcomes by force, hath overcome but half his foe." Having a full measure of ego himself, and inspiring a good opinion of themselves in his co-workers, he showed that

Oft times nothing profits more Than self-esteem, grounded on just and right Well managed.

A revelation was before us that, as the phraseology suggests, his regime was Miltonic--magisterial without either false modesty or false pride.

He did not describe his work in poetic terms. To him, his successes in Machievellian manipulations of the department budget, in persuading good men to come to Oregon, in vigorously pushing through promotion and tenure for younger members of the department as soon as they became eligible for consideration, in wangling salary increases for everybody who deserved one -his skill in these maneuvers, he said, was the result of years of chess competition in the stiffest circles. An ability to think many moves ahead, to anticipate any possible countermove, and to carry in his head a complete diagram of the academic game stood him in good stead.

Evory aspect of the game was computerized in his mind and stored in his phenomenal memory. Not for nothing had he once memorized the 2,853 lines of the first two books of Paradise Lost, just to show that he could do it.

Yet he was much more than a machine capable of prodigious mental feats. He was a man of compassion and tolerance for most varieties of human error. Stupidity he found it difficult to forgive, because he was a hard-headed realist who saw differences of intellectural merit in each specimen of humanity. Dullards, whether lowly or highly placed, were likely to get the back of his hant. The graduate students who called his course in bibliography and methods of literary study '~ncle Kester's shooting gallery" knew this, or soon discovered it. Laggards received short shrift. Any undergraduate or teaching assistant or part-time instructor or NDEA Fellow who crossed him was "an impudent yound whippersnapper." At the same time, his authoritarian air was mitigated by innumerable acts of kintness toward his fallen fellow men. If a student needed money for groceries, was having trouble with his wife or his draft board, had misbehaved in a way to attract the attention of the police, or had fouled up in some other unimaginable fashion, he could get understanding and help from the head of the English Department, who was always accessible. Behind the tough front of his official personality lurked a private heart, and many found the way to it. When he went recruiting for new talent for the department, he liked to call the setup at Oregon a "benevolent despotism." That scared some young applicants out of their wits, but the show he ran was far more benevolent than despotic.

His leadership was firm but flexible. He listened to advice but made his own decisions. Under the stimulus of his leadership his department, toward which he felt paternalistic and possessive, rose to take its place beside other first-rate English departments across the country. It became strong under his guidance in conventional areas of study in English and American literature, in all of which it has made an impact. It became well known with progressive programs in newer fields such as linguistics, vertical composition, the teaching of writing by professor-graduate instructor teams, teaching experience for all doctoral candidates, the preparation of teachers for the public schools, folklore, creative writing, and curriculum planning. These achievements could not have been predicted of a traditionalist, unless he also had an open mind to the expectations of society for education Ln a changing world.

Kester Svendsen belonged to a breed rare in the profession. He was, in fact, sui generis. We shall not easily meet his like again.

At Mr. McNeir's request, the chairman instructed the secretary to include the memorial in the minutes of this meeting of the faculty and to send copies to members of Mr. Svendsen's family.

COMMITTEE ON THE STUDENT CONDUCT CODE" The secretary reported that an ad hoc Committee on the student Conduct Code, established by action of the faculty at its April 1968 meeting with instructions to report not later than the November 1968 meeting, is not yet prepared to report, and that Mr. W. T. Simpson, its chairman, has asked for an extension of eime. By general consent, the request was granted.

POLICY CONCERNINC PERSONS REFUSING SELECTIVE-SERVICE INDUCTION. Mr. S. B. Greenfield withdrew the following motion, notice of which was given through the campus mail on September 11, 1968 and held over, at Mr. Greenfield's request, until this meeting: That the University of Oregon faculty recommends to the Acting President that he implement, or take steps to implement, the following resolution: That conviction of, or accusation of, violation of the selective service laws for the refusal of induction upon the grounds of conscience should not influence any personnel action of the University of Oregon, including admission to employment as staff members, promotion and tenure, admission to student status, and eligibility for fellowships, assistantships, and scholarships.

VOTING STATUS OF SENIOR INSTRUCTORS. Mr. C. P. Patton stated that he wished to hold over to the December 1968 faculty meeting his notice of motion, given at the October 1968 meeting, concerning the voting status of persons with the academic rank of senior instructor.

TV BROADCASTING OF FACULTY MEETINGS. Mr. 3. F. Gange moved the adoption of the following resolution:

Recognizing that hundreds of faculty and students who might wish to attend the open meetings of the University faculty are unable to do so because of class schedules, and

Recognizing that many members of the community who might wish to attend faculty meetings are unable to do so because of work commitments at our meeting time,

The faculty therefore resolves that televising equipment and technicians should be admitted to the meeting room in order to record the proceedings of the meeting for later showing on PL-3 and any commercial TV station interested in presenting the program.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Basye reported that he would move on behalf of the Faculty Senate, at the proper time, that the motion be tabled.

:4

Mr. R. A. Littman moved that the meeting be adjourned. The motion was seconded. The chairman stated that the agenda included several notices of motion, and asked unanimous consent to delay a vote on Mr. Littman's motion pending the presentation of these notices. No objection was heard.

OVERSEAS PROGRAlSS. Mr. Nontgomery, chairman of an ad hoc Committee on Overseas Programs, gave notice that he would move, on behalf of his committee, at the December 1968 faculty meeting that a standing Committee on Overseas Programs be established.

(1) Its members shall be appointed by the President of the University on tbe recommendation of the Committee on Committees. Its membership should include: (a) faculty members and students who have participated in overseas programs; (b) the director of the University of Oregon International Education Center; (c) the foreign-student program evaluator of the Admissions Office. Directors of overseas programs should be excluded.

(2) Its purposes shall be: (a) to review regularly and to approve the academic standards of organized programs now associated with the University; (b) to establish policy, and to evaluate and approve programs proposed in the future before transfer credit is accepted; (c) to follow generally the academic standards enumerated in "Guidelines for Foreign Study Programs in the Oregon State System of Higher Education," Office of Academic Affairs, July 24-25, 1967, pp. 3-6 -- these guidelines should apply to both (a) and (b) sbove, and be revised or supplemented whenever necessary; (d) to review all transfer of credits from foreign universities, in cooperation with the Office of Admissions.

SABBATICAL LEAVE POLICY. Mr. Gange gave notice that he would move at the December 1968 faculty meeting the adoption of the following motion: Recognizing the need for greater flexibility in the use of sabbaticalleave opportunities, e.g., access to earned leave pay after periods of less than six full years of service, credit for teaching a full elevenweeks summer term, and permission to accumulate earned sabbatical leave to the extent of drawing full pay for t full academic year, the faculty requests the Board of Higher Education to give early and sympathetic study to ways of improving the existing sabbatical-leave programs.

ADJOURNMENT. Mr. Littman's motion that the meeting be adjourned was put to a vote and carried.

George N. Belknap Secretary of the Paculty REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY December 4, 1968

The meeting was called to order by Acting President Johnson. The minutes of the meeting of November 6, 1968 were approved.

TV BROADCASTING OF FACULTY MEETINGS. The Faculty continued consideration of the following resolution, moved by Mr. J. P. ¢ange at the November meeting:

Recognizing that hundreds of faculty members and students who might wish to attend the open meetings of the University faculty are unable to do so because of class schedules, and recognizing that many members of the community who might wish to attend faculty meetings are unable to do so because of work commitments at our meeting time,

The faculty therefore resolves that televising equipment and technicians should be admitted to the meeting room in order to record the proceedings of the meeting for later showing on PL-3 and any commercial TV station interested in presenting the program.

Mr. S. A. Pierson, Paculty Senate reporter at the November meeting, summarized the Senate consideration of Mr. Gange's motion. After discussion, Mr. W. M. Basye secretary of the Senate, moved on behalf of the Senate that the motion be tabled. The motion to table was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY. The Acting President asked general consent to change the customary order of business to allow the presentation of reports on the state of the University before proceeding to new business. No objection was heard.

The Acting President commented on questions raised by Governor XcCall concerning the language of recent campus publications. He stated that he has no intention of compromising the principles of freedom of expression in the University community, as he understands these principles, and that it is the policy of the University administration to follow legal rules in the consideration of problems raised by such publications. It has, however, become apparent that policies governing the use of the facilities of the student print shop have not been clearly stated and need review and reconsideration. This task has been assigned to a committee including students and members of the President's staff; the committee is expected to report suggestions for a revised policy statement in the near future.

The Acting President also reported on steps taken to balance the 1968-69 University budget and provided some preliminary information concerning the Governor's proposed higher-education budget for 1969-70.

DEGREE RECOMt~DATIONS The secretary read a memorandum from Mr. C. L. Constance, University R0gistrar, certifying that the official degree list for the December 13, 1968 Graduation Convocation will include all and only those degree candidates who complete their respective degree requirements by the end of the fall term. Mr. R. L. Bowlin moved that the faculty of the University of Oregon recommend that the Oregon State Board of Higher Education confer upon the persons whose names are included in the official degree list, compiled by the llniversity Registrar after the December 13, 1968 Graduation Convocation, the degrees for which they have completed all requirements. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

VOTING STATUS OF SENIOR INSTRUCTORS. Mr. C. P. Patton withdrew a motion, notice of which he had given at the October 1968 faculty meeting, providing that all persons with the rank of senior instructor be included in the vating membership of the faculty.

COMMITTEE ON OVERSEAS PROC,RAMS. Mr. K. E. Montgomery asked that his motion for the establishment of a standing Committee on Overseas Programs, notice of which was given at the November faculty meeting, be held over to the January 1969 mee~ ing, to allow time for consideration of revisions of the motion. In reply to an inquiry by Mr. Gange, Mr. Montgomery stated that, if the motion is substantially revised, the new version will be referred to the Paculty Senate for review before the January 1969 faculty meeting. Mr. Montgomery's request was granted.

SABBATICAL LEAVE POLICY. Mr. Gange moved that the faculty reguest the President to urge the State Board of Higher Education to give early and sympathetic study to ways of improving the existing sabbatical-leave programs, in order to provide greater flexibility in the use of sabbaticalleave opportunities. Consideration might be given to the possibility of authorizing faculty members to apply for earned-leave pay after periods of less than six full years of service; to providing sabbatical leave credit for full-time summer session teaching; and to authorizing faculty members to accumulate sabbatical-leave credit until they would be eligible for a full year's leave at full salary.

The motion was seconded. Mr. Basye reported that the Faculty Senate recommended its adoption. Mr. L. C. Merritt, Senate reporter for this meeting; summarized the Senate consideration of this and other motions before the faculty. After discussion, Mr. Gange's motion was put to a vote and carried.

STUDENT CONDUCT CODE AMENDMENT. Mr. W. S. Nobles, chairman of the Student Conduct Committee, moved on behalf of his committee to amend the Student Conduct Code by: (1) adding a new Sec. I.B.2.; -- Conduct which intentionally obstructs or disrupts the educational process; and (2) redesignating the present Sec. I.B.2.] as Sec. I.B.2.k.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Basye reported that the Faculty Senate recosamended its adoption. After discussion, Mr. E. F. Beal moved to table the motion; the motion to table was seconded, put to a vote, and defeated. After further discussion, Mr. Noble's motion was put to a vote and carried.

FINAL EXAlSINATION POLICY. Mr. Basye moved, on behalf of the Paculty Senate, that the faculty approve the report of an ad hoc committee on final examination policy, established by action of the faculty at its April 3, 1968 meeting (a copy of the report is filed in the office of the secretary of the faculty as a part of these minutes). The motion was seconded. Mr. Basye explained that two motions by Mr. C. T. Duncan concerning final examination policy had been referred to the ad hoc committee for study and report, and that the committee's report concluded that there is no need for additional legislation on the subject of final examinations, Mr. Basye's motion was then put to a vote and carried.

ADJOURNMENT. There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned.

George N. Belknap Secretary of the Faculty REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY January 15, 1969

The meeting was called to order by Acting President Johnson. The minutes of the meeting of December 4, 1968 were approved.

COURSE C}IANGES. Mr. W. M. Basye, secretary of the Faculty Senate, moved on behalf of the Senate the approval of course changes for the 1969-70 Catalog recommended by the Committee on the Curriculum on pages 1-28 of a report dated January 8, 1969 -- excluding changes in the Department of Political Science on pages 11-15, which were approved by the faculty at its May 1968 meeting. (A copy of the report is filed in the office of the secretary of the faculty as a part of these minutes.) The motion was seconded.

While the report was before the faculty Mr. Belknap left the rostru~s to assist Mr. J. C. Sherwood, chairman of the Committee on the Curriculum, in his role as secretary of the committee. Mr. C. L. Constance served as secretary of the faculty pro tem during this period.

By general consent, the following changes were made in the report:

Page 6, German and Russian, Changes in Old Courses -- add GL 514, 515, 516. Middle High German. 5 hours each term. Formerly: 3 hours each term.

Page 10, Mathematics, Changes in Old Courses -- change number of Mth 444, 445, 446 to Mth 465, 466, 467.

Page 28, Music, New Courses -- change number of Mus 595 to Mus 593. After discussLon, Mr. Basye's motion was put to a vote and carried.

CCMtlITTEE REPORTS, lIr. J. L. Hulteng, chairman of the Advisory Council, presented the fall-term 1968-69 report of the Council. Mr. O. J. Hollis, chairman of the Faculty Senate, reported that the officers of the Senate and the Advisory Council had met with Acting President Johnson and Chancellor Lieuallen, in accordance with a request by the faculty at its June 5, 1968 meeting, for the purpose of discussing problems set forth in the June 5 minutes. Mr. D. L. Thompson, chairman of the Campus Parking Committee, reported on the work of his committee and on the problems with which it is concerned.

C()MMITTEE ON FOREIGN STUDY PROGRAMS. Mr. K. E. Montgomery, chairman of an ad hoc Committee on Foreign Study Programs, moved on behalf of his committee the adoption of the following motion:

That a standing Committee on Foreign Study Programs be established. Its members shall be appointed by the President of the University and consist of faculty members and students. Its purposes shall be: (a) to review regularly and to approve the academic standards of organized foreign study programs now associated with the University for the continued granting of academic credit; (b) to establish policy, to evaluate, and to make recommendations to the faculty, through the Faculty Senate, regarding the approval of programs proposed in the future, before transfer of credit is accepted; (c) to follow generally the academic standards enumerated in "Guidelines for Foreign Study Programs in the Oregon State System of Higher Education" (July 24-25, 1967). These guidelines should apply to both (a) and (c) above and be revised or supplemented whenever necessary.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Basye reported that the Faculty Senate recommended its adoption. Mr. L. C. Merritt, reporter for the Senate at this meeting, summarized the Senate discussion of the proposal.

After further discussion, the motion was put to a vote by a show of hands and carried: yes, 39; no, 38. Mr. Constance and Mr. Belknap served as tellers.

INDEPENDENT STUDY PROGRAM IN HONORS COLLEGE. Mr. F. E. Dart, Director of the Honors College, gave notice thae he would move, on behalf of the Honors College, at the February 5, 1969 meeting of the faculty:

That there be established within the Honors College a new class of students to be known as independent scholars. Individual students may be admitted to this status upon nomination by a member of the faculty, with the approval of the director of the uonors College. The nomination should be based solely on evidence of creative or scholarly originality and ability wo work independently toward a creative or scholarly goal. Such evidence should not be Lonfined to academic records of credits and grades, and acceptance as an independent scholar should not be refused on the basis of academic record alone.

Individuals admitted as independent scholars will be exempt from all academic requirements of courses, credits, and grades. They will be expected to plan a program of study directed at some creative or scholarly goal, under the supervision of a committee of three members of the University faculty appointed by the director of the Honors College. Each scholar, with the advice of his committee chairman, must prepare a written outline of his planned program of study together with criteria which are to be used in evaluating his progress toward his stated goals. When this outline has been approved by his committee, a copy will be filed with the Honors College where it will become a basis for judging the student's progress toward an eventual degree.

The scholar should meet with the chairman weekly and with the full committee once each term for evaluation of his progress. The Committee chairman will submit a written report at the end of each term outlining and evaluating the work of that term. When the scholar has completed his program and is recommended for a degree, the committee will write a description and evaluation of his work which can form the basis for letters of reference to graduate schools or employers. The scholar shall remain in good standing so long as his committee chairman reports, at the end of each term, that he is making satisfactory progress towards his goal. If, in the judgment of the committee and the director of the Honors College, the scholar is not making satisfactory progress, the status of independent scholar may be revoked, and the individual will then be subject to the normal academic requirements of the University. If a student changes his status from that of independent scholar to that of a normal University student, whether by his initiative or by that of his commit-tee, the committee will recommend a eransfer of credits to his record equivalent to the work he has completed satisfactorily as a scholar. This transfer in no way precludes the scholar's right to petition for credit or to seek credit by examination.

Independent scholars, on payment of the regular tuition for full-time students, may attend any University course, or any part of such course, including lectures, discussions, laboratories, and other exercises, without formal registration, provided the consent of the instructor in charge is obtained. The scholar may, but need not, take course examinations. If, however, he wishes to have grades recorded for any course, he must register in the normal way and meet the full normal requirements of the course.

He shall have the same Library privileges as graduate students. For recordkeeping purposes the scholar's work as an independent student will be listed under the title, "HC 405. Independent Study,'. i~ollowed by designation of the appropriate area of study.

Independent scholars may be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science on the recommendation of the director of the Bonors College and of the chairman of an academic department, the chairman of a committee on interdisciplinary studies, or the dean of a professional school. This recommendation shall be based on the following criteria:

(1) Completion of work equivalent to four years (12 terms) of study towards the scholar's goal either in the regular curriculum or as a scholar under the supervision of a committee.

(2) Evidence of accomplishment in the form of creative and scholarly productions in the stiences, humanities, or arts.

(3) An examination, to be conducted by a committee of which the scholar's committee chairman shall be chairman, and including representatives of the appropriate department, school, or committee to dertermine the general scholarly equipment and accomplishment, of the scholar relevant to his area of interest. -

NONGRADED CREDIT FOR HASTER'S DEGREE. Miss Leona E. Tyler gave notice that she would move, on behalf of the Graduate Council, at the February 1969 meeting of the faculty that not more than 21 of the 45 required credit hours for a master's degree may be taken in nongraded courses.

ADJOVRNMENT. There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned.

George N. Belknap Secretary of the Faculty REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY February 5, 1969

The meeting was called to order by Acting President Johnson. The minutes of the meeting of January 15, 1969 were approved.

INDEPENDENT STUDY IN HONORS COLLEGE. Mr. F. E. Dart, director of the Honors College, moved on behalf of the college:

That there be established within the Honors College a new class of students to be known as independent scholars. Individual students may be admitted to this status upon nomination by a member of the faculty with the approval of the director of the Honors College and the chairman of an academic department, the chairman of a committee on interdisciplinary studies, or the dean of a professional school. The nomination should be based so}ely on evidence of creative or scholarly originality and ability to work independently toward a creative or scholarly goal. Such evidence should not be confined to academic records of credits and grades and acceptance as an independent scholar should not be refused on the basis of academic record alone.

Individuals admitted as independent stholars will be exempt from all academic requirements of courses, credits, and grades. They will be expected to plan 8 program of study directed at some creative or scholarly goal, under the supervision of a committee of three members of the University faculty appointed by the director of the Honors College. It is understood that this program of study, while not restricted to any specific courses or topics, will nevertheless maintain the spirit of a broadly based liberal education that has characterized the Honors College. Each scholar with the advice of his committee chairman must prepare a written outline of his planned program of study together with criteria which are to be used in evaluating his progress toward his stated goals. When this outline has been approved by his committee, a copy will be filed with the Bonors College where it will become a basis for judging the student~s progress toward an eventual degree.

The scholar should meet with the chairman weekly and with the full committee once each term for evaluation of his progress. The committee chairman will submit a written report at ehe end of each term outlining and evaluating the work of that term. When the scholar has completed his program and is recommended for a degree, the committee will write a description snd evaluation of his work which can form the basis for letters of reference to graduate schools or employers. The scholar shall remain ia good standing so long as his committee chairman repprts, at the end of each term, that he is making~satisfactory progress towards his goal. If, in the judgment of the committee and the director of the Honors College, the scholar is not making satisfactory progress, the status of independent scholar may be revoked, and the individual will then be subject to the normal academic requirements of the University. If a student changea his status from that of independent scholar to that of a normal University student, whether by his initiative or by that o£ his committee, the committee will recommend a transfer of credits to his record equivalent to the work he has completed satisfactorily as a scholar. This transfer in no way precludes the scholar's right to petition for credit or to seek credit by examination.

Independent scholars, on payment of the regular tuition for full-time students, may attend any University course, or any part of such course, including lectures, discussions, laboratories, and other exercises, without formal registration, provided the consent of the instructor in charge is obtained. The scholar may, but need not, take course examinations. If, however, he wishes to have grades recorded for any course, he must register in the normal way and meet the full normal requirements of the course~ For record-keeping purposes the scholar's work as an independent student will be listed under the title, "RC 402. Independent Study," followed by designation of the appropriate area of study.

Independent scholars will be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Arts on the recommendation of the director of the Honors College and the chairman of an academic department, the chairman of a committee on interdisciplinary studies, or the dean of a professional school. This recommendation shall be based on the following criteria:

(1) Completion of work equivalent to four years (12 terms) of study towards the scholar's goal either in the regular curriculum or as a scholar under the supervision of a committee.

(2) Evidence of accomplishment in the form of creative and scholarly productions in the sciences, humanities, or arts.

(3) An examination, to be conducted by a committee of which the scholar's committee chairman shall be chairman, and including representatives of the appropriate department, school, or committee to determine the general scholarly equipment and accomplishment of the scholar relevant to his area of interest.

This program will be reviewed by the University Academic Requirements Committee or such other review body as the President may appoint no later than the end of its third year of operation. The review will consider its operation and academic quality and make recommendations relative to its continuation and revision if needed. Until then the program will be limited to an enrollment of no more than twenty students at any one time.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. W. M. Basye, secretary of the Paculty Senate, reported that the Senate recommended its adoption. Mr. Roland 8artel, Faculty Senate reported at this meeting, summarized the Senate discussion.

After discussion, Mr. A. P. Rubin moved to amend number paragraph (3) to read: An examination, to be conducted by a committee of at least four members, of which the scholar's committee chairman shall be chairman, and ineluding representatives of three different departments, schools, or committees, none of whom shall be on the scholar's supervisory committee, to determine the general scholarly equipment and accomplishment of the scholar relevant to his area of interest. The motion to amend was seconded and, after discussion, put to a vote and defeated.

Mr. Ivan Niven inquired whether Mr. Dart would accept the change of the singular words in numbered paragraph (3), "department, school, or committee," to plurals: 'idepartments, schools, or committees." Mr. Dart accepted this change.

The principal motion was then put to a standing vote and carried: Yes, 75; no, 8. Mr. C. L. Constance, Mr. J. C. Sherwood, and Mr. Theodore Stern served as tellers.

NONGRADED CREDIT FOR MASTER'S DEGREE. Miss Leona E. Tyler requested that consideration of her motion concerning nongraded credit ior the master's degree, notice of which was given at the January 15, 1969 faculty meeting, be postponed until the March 1969 meeting. The request was granted.

ACADEMIC CREDIT FOR COURSES IN MILITARY SCIENCE. Mr. R. S. Preeman gave notice that he would move, at the March 1969 faculty meeting, that, effective September 1970, the University of Oregon cease to offer credit for courses in militarg science and aerospace studies.

STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY. Mr. Bower Aly addressed two questions to Acting President Johnson: (1) What action is being taken concerning the recent forceful eviction of officers of the United States Navy from their station in the Erb Memorial Union? (2) Is it contemplated that the officers will be permitted to resume their station in the ~Erb Memorial Unionl

Mr. Johnson stated that the official apology of the University for the incident to which Mr. Aly referred has been conveyed to the Navy, that the University is cooperating fully with Navy officials and local law enforcement officers in an investigation of the incident, and that the secretary of the Student Conduct Committee has been instructed to assemble information for the committee, Evidence gathered by the Lane County district attorney will be presented to the grand jury in the near future. The Navy, as an agency, does not wish to bring charges, but individual Navy personnel will provide information for the grand jury and the Student Conduct Committee. Involvement of the committee, however, involves a problem of timing. The district attorney has informed the University that action under the Student Conduct Code before presentation of evidence to the grand 3ury and possible trial in the courts might jeopardize the proper handling of the incident through these public agencies. On the other hand, any action under the Student Conduct Code would have to be taken before the end of the school year. At present we are awaiting the results of the grand jury hearing,

In reply to Mr. Aly's second question, Mr. Johnson first read the University's official policy statement concerning the use of University facilities by employment placement agencies. Under this policy, campus facilities are open to prospective employers without discrimination, and the University tries to satisfy the special needs of various employers in regard to kind and location of facility. Re stated that it is his belief that the open-campus policy for job recruitment means just what it says.

Mr. Johnson also replied to questions from the floor concerning the grape boycott and dormitory food servLce, campus parking problems, a report on "The Case for Dispatching R.O.T.C." summarized in the Or~~~on Dailv Emerald, and State System budgetary requests for the expansion of

graduate work at Portland State College.

There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned.

George N. Belknap Secretary of the Faculty REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY March 5, 1969

The meeting was called to order by Acting President Johnson. The minutes of the meeting of February 5, 1969 were approved.

APRIL FACULTY MXETING POSTPONED. The chairman announced that the regular April faculty meeting would be held on Wednesday, April 9, instead of April 2. He explained that the last Wednesday in March, the regular meeting day of the Faculty Senate, falls this year during spring vacation, making it necessary to postpone the Senate meeting until April 2.

DOCTOR OF ABTS DEGREE. Mr. W. M. Basye, secretary of the Faculty Senate, moved on behalf of the Senate ehe approval of the recommendation of the Co ~ittee on the Curriculum, contained in a report dated February 19, 1969: The Committee on the Curriculum recommends that the faculty of the University of Oregon approve the establishment of the graduate degree of Doctor of Arts (D.A.) with a major in English. The proposal has been reviewed and approved by the Graduate Council. Requirements for the degree will include all requirements of the University and the Department of English for the Ph.D. degree, except the writing of a dissertation. These requirements include residence and course requirements for the doctorate, the foreignlanguage doctoral requirement of the Department of English, supervised teaching experience, six two-hour fleld examinations, and one four-hour special field examination. The new degree is proposed only for studies in the field of English. Programs leading to this degree in other fields, if proposed at a later date, will be subject to the approval of the Graduate Council, the University faculty, and the Oregon State Board of Higher Education.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. J. C. Sherwood, chairman of the Committee on the Curriculum, read an explanation of the proposal in a letter from Mr. Roland Bartel, acting head of the Department of English. The motion was then put to a vote and carried.

COMMITTEE REPORTS. Mr. R. S. Freeman, chairman of the Committee on Federal Aid and Academic Freedom, c~lled attention to a report of his committee, wbich has been distributed to the faculty through the campus mail.

Mr. Sherwood, chairman of the Committee on the Curriculum, informed the faculty that, with the ppproval of the Acting President, the schedule for the clearance of curricular changes and for the publication of the University Catalog has been revLsed, as follows:

June 15--Final date for submission of new curricula and degrees eo the Committee on the Curriculum.

December l--Final date for the submission of all course changes to the Committee on the Curriculum.

February--Faculty review and approval.

May 1--Catalog Publication.

RECOMMXNDATION FOR CONFERRAL OF DEGREES. The secretary read the following memorandum from Mr. C. L. Constabce, University Registrar: Will you please present to the faculty for recommendation to the State Board, at the March meeting, ms, certification that the Official Degree list for the March 14, 1969 Graduation Convocation will include all and only those degree candidates who completed their respective degree requirements by the end of winter term?

Mr. V. L. Barkhurst moved that the faculty of the University of Oregon recommend that the Oregon State Board of Higher Education confer upon the persons whose names are included in the official degree list, compiled by the University Registrar after the March 14, 1969 Graduation Convocation, the degrees for which they have compleeed all requirements. The motion was seconded, put to a vote and carried.

~EL MC CLAIN MEMO'RIAL. Mr. Earl Pomeroy presented the following memorial:

Nabel Elizabeth Eaton McClain (May 18, 1881-January 13' 1969) had associations wi th the University of Oregon over more than sixty-seven years, and in several capacities, since she came to Eugene as a freshman in 1901. After graduating in 1905 with a major in English, she taught English and Latin for two years in the high school at Union, her birthplace. She then attended Simmons College (1907-08), taking a degree in library science, and worked at the New York Public Library (sun~ner 1908) before returning to Oregon, to work at the Portland Public Library for two years. In t910 she married another graduate of the University, Marion F. McClain (1880-1950), who was in business in Eugene before he founded the first University of Oregon cooperative bookstore in 1916 and later served for three years as graduate manager of the Associated Students (19 18-21).

. . ~ .

Meanwhile, Mrs. McClain joined the staff of the University Library in 1912, later becoming head circulation librarian and teaching courses in book selection. Resigning in 1933, she first did graduate work in English literature at the University, and then in American history at Stanford and at the University of California at Berkeley between 1933 and 1936. She became interested in the opportunities for collecting materials for research on the history of the Pacific Northwest, in which Professor Robert Carlton Clark and Vice-Presidant Burt Brown Barker were engaged, and in 1937 joined the Department of 8istory as research associate in history. Especially

when Clark soon thereafter died and Barker retired, she assumed virtually ,~

exclusive responsibility for developing the research collections of the Library in what later became the Division of Special Collections. A1though the Library had received manuscripts for many years, the person who solicited them most actively was Dean Prederick G. Young, who was secretary-treasurer of the Oregon Ristorical Society and editor of its Quarterlv as well as professor of history and sociology, and most of the materials that he collected had gone to the society's library in Portland. Mrs. McClain brought in some of the University~s most important manuscript collections, and acquired large quantities of pamphlet material, which at that time few university libraries were collecting actively. Traveling over the state at her own expense and paying for her telephone calls, she was the University's representative to surviving pioneers and their descendants. Sometimes she was the contact by which gitf-ts other than materials for the Library came to the University. In the course of Mrs. McClain's conversations with Miss Carrie Beekman about the papers and library of Miss 8eehman's father, Benjamin BeeRman, the pioneer banker of Jacksonville, Miss BeeWman decided to leave her estate to the lluiversLty to endow a professorship in the history of the Pacific Northwest.

Retiring in 1947, Mrs. McClain continued to take an active interest in the University community, and particularly in activities of the departments of History and English, Phi Beta Rappa, Phi Beta Patronesses, and Friends of the University Library. In 1957, with the University of Oregon Co-op Store, she established the Marion F. McClain Prize Award in Pacific Northwest History for manuscripts submitted by graduate students at the University, and joined the other members of the committee on the award in reading entries, showing in her comments her characteristic sense of style and her vivid memory for partinulars and personalities. Of the six manuscripts winning award thus far, four have appeared as books. She regularly attended lectures, concerts, and other events on the campus to within several weeks of her death. At the age of eighty-five she flew with the University basketball team to Rawaii. She was a lively and independent spirit, living in the present with as much zest as she recalled the past.

At Nr. Pomeroy's request, the chairman instructed the secretary to record thLs memorial in the minutes of the faculty and to send a copy to Mrs. McClain's family.

BURT BROWN BARKER MEMORIAL. Mr. R, D, Rorn presented the following memorial:

In March 1967, the University honored Dr, Burt Brown Barker with one of its Awards for Distinguished Service, a recognition that is accorded annually to only two or three persons. The tribute which was read at that time is so fair and adequate as to make any further statement seem superfluous. Nevertheless, in the tradition of the faculty's paying a final tribute to longstanding members, something further is in order, The teaching profession may wel-1 honor a man of well-honed intelligence and gracious presence who honors them and their work. On his coming to the campus I was struck by two things: the uniqueness of his position as Vice-President, and more specifically the imporeance of his service as liaison ambassador to the important Portland community during the very critical years of the depression and threats to the very survival of the University. Such a contribution by its very nature must be highly tactful and largely anonymous, Whatever Dr. Barker was able to accomplish in evoking substantial support for us in the Portland area time alone can tell. Generosity is a plant that often demands careful attention, and then often it blossoms slowly. As a legally trained man, and an attorney of long and successful experience in New York, the Vice-President could explain how gifts might have actuarial compensations.

Dr. Barker's own studies and enthusiasms included pioneer activities, and particularly the affairs of the Hudson's Bay Company. I frequently saw him, sitting with the faculty at lunch in Friendly Hall, and he appeared at public occasions, especially at Commencements, where he reported on gifts to the University. His own gift of the quietly moving statue of the Pioneer Mother, and his encouragement of the erection of the Dads' Gates, are monuments to a man who cherished the past, and who had a quiet, unassailable faith in the future, of the West, and of the University of Oregon.

"Burt Brown Barker, pioneer son of the Pacific Northwest, after a distinguished career in the practice of law in the East, and while still a young man, returned to the land of bis youth to give his generous talents to a multitude of good works. Scholar and author in the field of Oregon history, he has been business leader, patron of the srts, crusader for children's health, conservator of historic sites, exemplar of international comity. The University of Oregon likes to believe that the capstone of his fruitful career has been his service as the first, and only, Vice-Presider.t of the University. In this post, to which he came in 1928, successive Presidents of the institution have prized the advantage of his vision and wisdom, Successive generations of ~tudents of the University will always be grateful for his friendship, his continuing solicitude for the integrity and amplitude of their educational opportunities."

-

Vice-President Barker's infIuence will be felt for many years to come* It is not too much to say that the vigorous and productive Development ~jnd and much in alumni relations activity grew out of what he began. Unthinking persons can deprecate the material side of a University's need for building, but only at the risk of jeopardizing its entire existence, Socrates taught in the open air, but the climate of Athens was considerably more favorable to out-of-doors colloquia than is that of Eugene. Dr, Barker was in the administration, but he had the heart of the teacher, as do all good administrators. He was a significant member of the personal, intimate life of the University. Let his memory be honored.

At Mr. Horn's request, the chairman instructed the secretary to record this memorial in the minutes of the faculty and to send a copy to Mr. Barker's family.

NONGRADED CREDIT FOR MASTER'S DEGREE Miss Leona E. Tyler moved, on behalf of the Graduate Council, that, to meet the requirements for a master's degree, a mini~jm of 24 hours out of the 45 credit hours req~ired by the Graduate School must be graded.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Basye reported that the Facult.y Senate recommended its adoption. Miss Tyler spoke to her motion, and Mr, C. T, Duncan, Senate reporter at this meeting, summarized the Senate discussion. After further discussion, the motion was put to a vote and carried.

ACADEMIC CREDIT POR COURSES IN MILITARY SCIENCE. Mr. Freeman requested that consideration sf his motion that the University cease granting academic credit for courses in military science and aerospace studies, notice of which was given at the February 5, 1969 meeting of the faculty, be deferred until the April 1969 faculty meeting. The request was granted.

STUDENT MEMBERS ON FACULTY COMMITTEES. Mr. P. E. Dart gave notice that he would move at the April 1969 faculty meeting, on behalf of a joint Yaculty Senate-Advisory Council Committee on Student Participation in University Governance, that student membership on faculty standing committees be authorized as follows:

Academic Requirements . . . . . . . . 1 studene

Admissions Policy . . . . . . . . . . 2 students Advising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 students Assembly and Lectures . . . ~ . . . . 3 students Broadcasting . . . . . . . . . . ~ . 2 students Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 student

Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 students Scholastic Deficiency . . . . . . . . 1 student

Teacher Education . . . . . . . . . . 3 students

Student members of these committees will be full members with full voting rights. They will be ineluded within the normal committee memberships without addition to the size of committees where size is specified by existing faculty legislation, except that student membership on the Committee on the Curriculum will be in addition to the specified faculty membership. Student members of faculty committees shall be appointed by the President of the University on recommendation by the president of the A.S.U.O. and confirmation by the A.S.~.O. Senate.

STUDENT CONDUCT CODE AMENDNENTS. Notices were given for three independent motions for the amendment of the Code of Student Conduct, to be presented at the April 1969 faculty meeting:

-

By Mr. F. R. Lacy, on behalf of the Student Conduct Committee: That Sec. I.A.3 of the Code of Student Conduct be amended by adding the following sentence: Nothing in this code should be interpreted as depriving a student of freedom to take reasoned an orderly exception to the data or views presented or to the methods of instruction utlized in his classes.

By Mr. P. R. Sherman, for Mr. Franklin Lowenthal. That the Oode of Student Conduct be amended as follows:

(1) Sec. I.A.2. The sentence "Ordinarily, the University will not impose further sanctions after law enforcement agencies or the courts have disposed of a case" shall be deleted.

(2) Sec. II.E. Paragraphs 6-11 shall be renumbered 7-12 and new paragraph 6 shall be added, to read as follows: The Associate Dean of Students shall refer to the Student Court or to the Student Conduct Committee all alleged violations of Sec. I.B.2, d, e, or j, of the Code of Student Conduct which constitute interference with the normal functioning of the University and which arose out of, or in connection with, an incident that has led to the conviction of the student in a municipal, county, state, or Federal court. The investigation of the alleged violation and the imposition of sanctions wherever warranted shall not be delayed or postponed because of appeals of the conviction that are being considered by the courts.

By Mr. Sidney Bernhard: That Sec. I.B.2.j of the Code of Student Conduct, specifying as an offense "Conduct which intentionally obstructs or disrupts the educational process," be repealed.

STUDENT RIGHTS. Mr. R, H. Rodgers moved the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the faculty of the University of Oregon has consistently expressed itself on issues of academic freedom and human rights within the University and Oregon community:

Be it resolved that the faculty of the University of Oregon views the current conflict between the administration, AthletLc Department, and Black Students Union at Oregon State University as constituting a significant threat to academic freedom and human rights on all Oregon campuses.

Be it further resolved: Inasmuch as nothing is as destructive to respect for rational authority and to an appreciation of the importance of self-discipline as being subjected to the destructive impact of authority exercised in a completely arbitrary manner, we, the faculty of the University of Oregon, affirm the personal and individual rights of all students to decide their own personal appearance and style of life without being subject to academic or economic coercion. We hold that in all cases due-proc-ess procedure must be followed in every area of the University community.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Bower Aly rose to a point of order, suggesting that it required notice. The chairman invited discussion of this question. After discussion, Mr. R. P. Friedman stated that he had amendments to Mr. Rodgers' motion to present if they were in order. The chairman ruled that amendments would not be in order at the present time. After further discussion, the chairman ruled that Mr. Rodgers' resolution presented a statement of opinion, not a change of policy, and therefore did not require notice.

Mr. J. N. Tattersall moved to amend by (1) changing the words "threat to" in the last line of the second paragraph of the resolution to "issue of," and (2) deleting the words "and style of life without being subject to academic or economic coercion" at the end of the first sentence of the third paragraph. The motion was seconded.

Mr. R T. Ellickson moved that the two changes proposed by Mr. Tattersall be considered as separate amendments. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried. Mr. Rodgers, with the consent of his second, accepted the first amendment, the change of the words "threat to" to "issue of," as a part of his principal motion.

Mr. E. F. Scoles requested that the deletion in the third paragraph proposed by Mr. Tattersall be divided and considered as two separate amendments, as follows: (1) the deletion of "and style of life" and (2) the deletion of "without being subject to academic or economic coercion." By general consent Mr. Tattersall's amendment was divided. After discussion, the motion to delete "andstyle of life" was put to a vote and carried. The motion to delete "without being subject to academic or economic coercion" was put to a vote and defeated.

Mr. Lowenthal moved to amend by adding the following paragraph: Be it further resolved that the faculty of the University of Oregon views the past and current conflicts between the administration and students at Brandeis University, the University of Wisconsin, the University of California at Berkeley, San Prancisco State College, Reed College, Duke University, the University of California at Santa Barbara, and other institutions as a significant threat to academie freedom and human rights everywhere insofar as they involve force and the threat of force by students to obtain specified demands.

Mr. L. E' Ward rose to a point of order, suggesting that Mr. Lowenthal's amendment was not germane to the principal motion and was therefore out of order. After discussion of this question, r.he chairman ruled that, since the preamble of the principal motion specified that its subJect was "academic freedom and human rights within the University and the Oregon community,"

the amendment was not germane and was therefore out of order. Mr. Lowenthal appealed from the ruling of the chair. Mr. O. J. Hollis rose to a point of order, pointing out that Mr. Lowenthal's appeal had not been seconded. A second was heard. The question being put to a vote, the chair was sustained.

Mr. Friedmen moved to amend the principal motion by (1) striking the words "and Oregon community" from the first paragraph. (2) deleting the second paragraph, (3) striking the word 'ifurther" from the first line of the third paragraph, and (4) changing the word i'affirm" in the fifth line of the third paragraph to "reaffirm.'. The motion was seconded.

After discussion, Mr. A. F. Moursund moved for separate consideration of the four parts of the amendment; the motion was seconded' put to a vote, and defeated. Mr. Friedman's motion was then put to a vote by a show of hands and defeated: yes; 55; no, 59. Mr. Constance, Nr. Ward, and Mr. Bartel served as tellers.

The principal motion, as amended, was then put to a vote and carried. Mr. Aly moved to reconsider and enter in the minutes. He stated that he had voted with the majority, as required under Robert's Rules of Order. Mr. Hollis read the section from Robert's Rules concerning the motion to reconsider and enter in the minutes, and pointed out that the effect of the making of this procedural motion is to suspend final action on the motion to which it is applied until the next meeting of the body, at which time the question of reconsideration will come before the body for decision. The purpose of the motion to reconsider and enter in the minutes is to give time to notify absent members of the proposed action.

Mr. Ellickson suggested that the chairman declare Mr. Aly's motion out of order; the chairman stated that, under Robert's Rules, he did not have this privilege.

After discussion of Mr. Aly's motion, Mr. Sherwood moved the adoption of the following resolution: Resolved that, regardless of the parliamentary situation, the faculty members here present reaffirm their earlier stand. Mr. Sherwood's motion was seconded.

Mr. Aly rose to a point of order, suggesting that Mr. Sherwood's motion, in substance, re^introduced Mr. Rodgers' motion for action at this meeting, although, by a proper parliamentary procedure, final action on Mr. Rodgers' motion has been delayed until the next meeting of the faculty. The chairman ruled that Mr. Sherwood's motion was out of order.

Mr. J. R. Wish appealed from the ruling of the chair; the appeal was seconded. Mr. Moursund moved that the meeting be adJourned; the motion was seconded. The chairman ruled that Mr. Wish's appeal had precedence. The appeal being put to a vote, the chair was sustained.

Mr. Moursund's motion that the meeting be adjourned was then put to a vote and carried.

George N. Belknap Secretary of the Faculty

REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY April 9, 1969

Mr. O. J. Hollis, serving as acting chairman in the absence of Acting President Johnson, called the meeting to order. The chairman noted that, in the next to the last paragraph of the minutes of the March 5, 1969 meeting, the words '1Mr. Rodgers"' should be changed to "Mr. Wish's." With this correction, the minutes of the March 5 meeting were approved.

VOTING FACULTY. The secretary read the following definition of the voting faculty of the University: All persons holding the academic rank of assistant professor or above; and all persons holding the rank of instructor or senior instructor who are employed in the fuil-time teaching of courses, giving instruction exelusively in schools, colleges, and departments that offer work for University credit.

STUDENT RIGuTS. The chairman stated that, at the March 5 faculty meeting, a resolution by Mr. R. R. Rodgers concerned wLth student rights had received a favorable vote, but that, on a motion to reconsider ant enter in the minutes by Mr. Bower Aly, final action on the resolution had been suspended untL1 this meeting. The secretary read the text of Mr. Rodgers' resolution, as amended at the March meeting:

Whereas the faculty of the University of Oregon has consistently expressed itself on issues of academic freedom and human rights within the University and Oregon Community:

Be it resolved that the faculty of the University of Oregon views the current conflict between the administration, Athletic Department, and Black Students Union at Oregon State University as constituting an Lssue of academic freedom and human rights on all Oregon campuseS.

Be it further resolved: Inasmuch as nothing is as destructLve to respect for rational authority and to an appreciatLon of the importance of self-discipline as being subjected to the destructive impact of authority exercised in a completely arbitrary manner, we, the faculty of the University of Oregon, affirm the personal and LndLvLdual rLghts of all students to decide their own personal appearance without being subject to academic or economLc coercLon. We hold that Ln all cases due-process procedure must be followed in every area of the University communLty.

The chairman explaLned that Mr. Aly's motion to reconsider was now before the faculeg and was open to debate, including debate on the merits of the principal motion; and that, if the faculty adopted the motion to reconsider, the principal motion would again be open to debate and to a=endment.

Hr. Aly stated that, if the faculty voted to reconsider, he would then move to amend the principal motion by deleting the paragraph referring to the situation at Oregon State University. WLth this paragraph deleted, he was prepared to support Mr. Rodgers' motLon. The motLon to reconsLder was then put to a standing vote and defeated: yes, 89; no, 173. Mr. C. L. Constance, Mr. Fred Mohr, and Nr. George Struble served as tellers for thLs and other standing votes during the meeting.

RECOGNIZED MINOR FACULTIES. Mr. W. M. Basye, secretary of the Paculty Senate, gave notice that he would move at the May 1969 faculty meeting, on behalf of the Faculty Senate, to amend legislation of March 1, }967 concerning the membership of the Faculty Senate by changing Sec. (2) to read as follows:

(2) That the following distinct and organized mLnor faculties shall be recognized by the general faculty of the University: College of Liberal Arts; School of Architecture and Allied Arts; College of Business Administration; School of Community Service and Public Affairs; College of Education; School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation; School of Journalism; School of Law; School of Librarianship; School of Music.

FACULTY SENAl1' ELECTI021S 8Y MINOR:FAGULTIES. ~M¢J B - *e~gaveinotieesthat he would move at the May 1969 faculty ma¢ting, on behalf of the Faculty Senate, to amend the March 1, 1967 legislation by adding a new Sec. (~):

(4) That, in the election of members of the Faculty Senate by the several minor faculties:

(a) No faculty member shall be eligible to vote in Senate elections in more than one minor faculty.

(b) Any faculty member who is affiliated with more than one minor faculty shall be eligible to vote in Senate elections only in the minor faculty of the school or college in which he is employed for the largest portion of his service, as shown by the University budget, provided the budget shows an unequal division of service responsibilities.

(c) Any faculty member for whom the University bu4get shows an equal distribution of service among two or more schools or colleges must choose the one =i~nor faculty with which he wishes to be affiliated for the purpose of Senate elections, and must notify the dean of each of the divisions involved, in writing, of his choice among the several minor faculties.

(d) Nothing in this amendment shall be interpreted to change the provisions of legislation of February 14, 1951 that Faculty Senate elections by minor faculties must be by secret ballot and that the voting privilege in minor-faculty Senate elections must be restricted to those eligible to vote in general faculty meetings.,

CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT. Mr. F. R. Lacy, acting chairman of the Student Conduct Committee, gave notice that he would move at the May 1969 faculty meeting, on behalf of the committee, to amend Sec. I.E.4 of the Code of Student Conduct by de-leting the second sentence: "Such

written regulations or rules shall be effective fifteen days after filing I w

with the secretary of the committee unless disapproved within this period by the committee."

REORGANIZATION OF THE GRADUATE COUNCIL, Miss Leona E. Tyler informed the faculty that she intended to give notice of motion for the reorganization of the Graduate Council, with two principal objectives: (1) to make the Council representative of the graduate faculty; (2) to give the Council authority to enact legislation and determine policy for the Graduate School.

STUDENT EVALUATION OF TEACHING. Mr. H. N. Goldstein gave notice that he would move at the Hay 1969 faculty meeting: That the University administration, in cooperation with the A. S.U.O. Senate, establish a program for the systematic evaluation of the quality of instruction in each and every undergraduate class regularly taught at the University. This evaluation shall be made through the use of carefully conceived questionnaires to be filled out--on an anonymous basis--near the close of each term's work by students in each instructor's class. Individual student evaluations shall be summarized for each class and the results printed and made available to all students and faculty members at nominal cost The results of these evaluations shall be considered as one significant measure of each faculty member's teaching performance when that faculty member is being considered for merit salary increases by his department chairman and for recommendation for promotion and tenure by the Advisory Council

PATENT POLICIES. Mr. L. H. Klemm, Chairman of the Patent Policies Committee, gave notice that he would move at the May 1969 faculty meeting, on behalf of his co~amittee, that it is deemed desirable for all faculty members to sign the "Agreement to Assign Patent Rights" of the University of Oregon.

ARRANGEMENT OF TRE AGENDA. Mr. D. S. uarwood rose to a poLnt of order, inquiring why items of business were not being taken up in the order in which they were presented in the agenda mailed to the faculty. The chairman replied that the complete agenda had not been in the hands of the secretary at the time the material mailed to the faculty was compiled. The secretary confirmed the chairman's statement.

RALPH R. HUESTIS MEMORIAL. Mr. J. A. Shotwell presented the following memorial for the late Mr. Ralph R. Huestis:

Ralph Ruskin Huestis belonged to a generation now rapidly dwindling from among us. Only a dozen members of the University faculty, and only one from the College of Liberal Arts, had a longer continuous tenure than he at the time of his death.

Ralph Huestis was born in 8ridgewater, Nova Scotia, on January 14, 1892. His father was a Methodist minister, and Ralph showed the tenacity and toughness, the strength and honesty and true humility that we may fairly attribute to a godly upbringing in a harsh and simple land. He was not himself formally religious, but could often be heard singing, wordlessly, the hymn tunes that must have been the music of his youth.

ue was graduate Bachelor of Science in Agriculture from McGill University in 1914 and went directly into the Canadian Army. Five years of combat service, during which his brother was killed beside him, strengthened him without making him bitter. He was discharged in 1919, married that same year, and entered Graduate School in the University of California. His work for the master's degree under R. E. Clausen involved a study in the genetics of Drosophila, then the most active and "fashionable'' field in biology. The work was a substantial contribution to the field, and was published, but Ralph Huestis was never one to follow fashion.

In 1920, he took a post as research assistant to Francis B. Sumner at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Sumner was a man of brilliant intellect, an iconoclastic turn of mind, and of the strictest scientific standards. He was engaged, at that time, in a study of the evolutionary genetics of wild mice of the genus Peromvscus, a study into which he bad been led by his intellectual repugnance towards Morgan's gene theory, the dogma of that day in biology. In the end, Sumner provided some of the best evidence for the validity of that theory in evolutionary interpretations.

Huestis found the intellectual and physical environment of what was then a relatively isolated scientific outpost congenial, and the course of his research bears the clear mark of Sumner's influence. His Ph.D. thesis was a detailed microecopic study of the hair characters which played a primary part in Sumner's and later Huestis' study of inheritance. In 1924, he was appointed assistant professor of zoology in the University of Oregon, and his entire academic and much of his personal life centered here until his death.

He was a naturalist in the best and truest sense of that term, with a boundless and enthusiastic interest in and curiosity about all nature. He served as curator of the Museum of Zoology from 1924 to 1937, and was instrumental in the formation of the Museum of Natural History in 1937. He collected over 7,000 of the animal specimens now in that Museum and was curator of zoology until 1962. He continued his studies on Peromyscus in a series of investigations on the inheritance of hair color and skeletal features, using the cLassical tools o£ genetic analysis. When Sumner turned from mice to fishes in later years,. the Pe£o'~scus colony~was transferred from La Jolla to Eugene, and was maintained here as a maJor resource of genetic material, largely through Huestis' unaided efforts. He could be found, almost any time, in the Mouse House, cleaning and caring for the gentle attractive little beasts. Many of his summers were spent as a naturalist at Crater Lake. His garden provided materials for our biology courses, and he knew much about birds, mice, ground squirrels, and people.

Research was by no means Ralph's only concern. He was above all an exacting but stimulating teacher. Like all good teacher, he was always willing to learn, and had a vast fund of information on many subjects gathered from a variety of sources. Without detailed background in anatomy and embryology, he mastered these subjects and taught them to generations of premedical students. Scratch any physician who did undergraduate work in Eugene during Huestis' long career, and you will find traces of that meticulous training. He was also an enthusiastic teacher of those who had no continuing interest in science. His contribution to the old Biological Science Survey course conveyed an appreciation of the importance to firm knowledge of careful observation and critical analysis, while his ready wit and broad enjoyment of all nature, especially human nature, gave a lighter touch to his teaching. He had a fund of anecdotes for illustration, and shared his own amusement at the peculiarities of nature, of mankind, and of himself with his classes. On the other side, he had little patience with rudeness or lack of application. Those students who whiled away the early part of a lecture by reading the Dailv Emerald were startled by the impact of a well-aimed eraser in the middle of their paper. Those who dropped off to sleep sometimes felt the sting of a flying bit of chalk. He who wandered in ten minutes late was subjected to a long silent stare, as the lecture stopped until he found a seat and was ready to listen. If the enrollment exceeded the capacity of the laboratory, the weakhearted were discouraged by a stif f examination at the end of the first week. 8ut for those who survived these things,- the result was worth the effort. He was a great teacher in a rigorous tradition, and a very human one. The young man who disputed a grade was, as often as not, challenged to a handball match to settle the matter. Ralph was, unofficially at least, handball champion of the faculty for many years, and there is no record of a student improving his grade in contest with him.

Ralph Huestis was, finally and above all, a loyal champion of this faculty. He was elected to the Advisory Council for nine successive terms, from 1945 to 1954, and served as chairman of the council from 1949 to 1951. He was a member of the Trowbridge committee, which undertook the revision of the University curriculum into the form which it still has. He was valiant in defending the faculty from enroachments by deans, presidents, boards, and legislatures. Yet he incurred no rancor and was never bitter when thwarted. The University did not always treat him well, but his efforts were always directed to improving the University.

Huestis' career was crowned by two major achievements in h$s last years of active work. In 1954 he discovered in his mice a case of inherited jaundice. He was quick to see the medical significance of this observation and with Mrs. Ruth Anderson worked out in full the pathological and genetic aspects of this disorder, which turned out to be closely similar to inherited jaundice in man. This work launched a series of major studies in other laboratories that are a monument to Huestis and to PeromYscus. In 1954 he was also appointed head of the Biology Department, and carried it through a critical and difficult period until his official retirement in 1957.

Ralph Huestis was not made for retirement. He continued teaching, though a little less actively, for five years, At 70, he began the melancholy process of dispersing the mouse colony he had maintained so long. A year ago he moved to Yachats and was seen less often on the cas~pus. On February 25, 1969 he died. This University will not see his like again.

At Mr. Shotwell's request the secretary was instructed to include the memorial in the minutes of this meeting, and to send a copy to Mr. Huestis' family.

ACADEMIC CREDIT FOR COURSES IN MILITARY SCIENCE. Mr. R. S. Freeman moved that, effective September 1970, the University of Oregon cease giving credit for courses in military science and aerospace studies. The motion was seconded.

Mr. Basye reported that the Faculty Senate recommended that the motion be disapproved. Mr. Freeman read a statement concerning his motion. Mr.~C. P. Patton, Senate reporter at this meeting, summarized the Senate discussion of the motion.

After extensive discussion, Mr. Walter Freauff moved the previous question. The motion was seconded. The chairman pointed out that the motion required a two-thirds majority for adoption. ~The motion for the previous question was then put to a vote and carried. Mr. Freeman's motion was then put to a standing vote and defeated: yes> 122; no, 218.

Mr. T. A. Brady rose to a point of order, inquiring by what rule the chairman had gagged certain members of the faculty by not allowing them to speak a second time concerning Mr. Preeman's motion. The chairman replied that it is a standard rule of parliamentary procedure that a member cannot make a second speech on the same question as long as any member who has not spoken on that question desires the floor. He also pointed out that a number of members who had not yet spoken on the motion were seeking the floor when the debate was concluded by action of the faculty through the adoption of a motion for the previous question.

ADJOURNMENT. The chairman pointed out at 5:30 p.m. that there were still five items of business on the agenda, and that it might be impossible to complete this business at this meeting. He suggested that the faculty consider what it wished to do in this contingency. On motion, the meeting might be simply adjourned, leaving unfinished business for the May meeting; or a motion might be made that, when the faculty adjourns, it adjourn to a fixed time stated in the motion. The chairman also informad the faculty that a suitable room would not be available for a 3:30 meeting on Thursday or Friday of this week, but that 150 Science Building would be available at 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 16.

Mr. Aly moved that, when this faculty adjourns, it adjourn to meet at 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 16. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried. Mr. R. W. Ualler then moved that the meeting be adjourned. The motion was seconded, put to a standing vote, and carried: yes, 82; no, 79. -

ADJOURNED MEETING OF THE FACULTY

April 16, 1969

Mr. O. J. Hollis, serving as acting chairman in the absence of Acting President Johnson, called the meeting to order.

ADMISSION POLICIES. Mr. J. C. Sherwood gave notice that he would mova at the May 1969 faculty meeting the adoption of the following resolution: Resolved, that the faculty recommends the retention, at least through 1969-70, of existing policies which permit the admission of certain students who do not meet ordinary entrance requirements.

STUDENT MEMBERS ON FACULTY COMMITTEES. Mr. F. E. Dart moved, on behalf of a joint Faculty Senate-Advisory Council Committee on Student Participation in University Governance, that student membership on faculty standing committees be authorized as follows:

Academic Requirements Committee . . . . . . . 1 student

Admissions Policy Committee ; . . . . . . . . 2 students Advising Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 students Assembly and Lectures Committee . . . . . . . 3 students Broadcasting Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . 2 students Committee on the Curriculum . . . . . . . . . 1 student Library Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 students Scholastic Deficiency Committee . . . . . . . 1 student Teacher Education Committee . . . . . . . . . 3 students

Student members of these committees will be full members with full voting rights. They will be included within the normal committee memberships without addition to the size of committees where size is specified by existing faculty legislation, except that stUdent membership on the Committee on the Curriculum will be in addition to the specified faculty membership. Student members of faculty committees shall be appointed by the President of the University on the recommendation by the prestdent of the A.S.U.0. and confirmation by the A.S.U.O. Senate.

The motion having been seconded, the chairman outlined its legislative history, beginning with a motion adopted at the June 5, 1968 meeting, in which the faculty requested the Faculty Senate and the Advisory Council to undertake the development of guidelines, to be submitted to the faculty, on the question of student participation in education policy decisions at the University. The formation of Nr. Dart's commLttee was a direct result of this request from the faculty.



Mr. W. M. Basye, secretary of the Faculty Senate, stated that, at the proper time, he would have two amendments to present on behalf of the Senate. Mr. Dart spoke to his motion, Mr. C. P. Patton, Senate reporter at this meeting, summarized the Senate discussion, and Mr. J. L. Hulteng, chairman of the Advisory Council, reported that the Council recommended the approval of the motion.

The chairman stated that, to insure orderly consideration, he would first invite discussion of the general provisions and intent of the motion; following this discussion, he would then invite discussion of the specific provisions for student members on each of the nine committees listed in the motion, in the order in which they are lLsted. Motions to amend these specifLc provisions would be in order when the committee in question was brought to the attention of the faculty.

Mr. H. W. Robinson, chairman of the Student-Faculty Council, reported that the Council endorsed Mr. Dart's motion. Mr. Dan Allison, vicepresident of the Associated Students, stated that the Student Senate recommended the approval of the motion. After further discussion of the general provLsions, the chaLrman LnvLted consideration of the specific provisions.

Mr. Basye moved, on behalf of the Faculty Senate, to amend by deleting from the specific provisions: Academic Requirements Committee . . . 1 student. The motion having been seconded, Mr. Patton summarized the Senate discussion. A£ter further discussion, Mr. Basye's motion was put to a vote and defeated.

Mr. Basye moved to amend by deleting from the specific provisions: Scholastic Deficiency Committee . . . 1 student. The motion having been seconded, Mr. Patton stated that hLs summary of the Senate dLscussion of the question of student members on the Academic Requirements Committee applied equally to the question of student members on the Scholastic Deficiency Committee. After further discussion, Mr. Basye's motion was put to a vote and defeated.

Mr. L. E. Ward moved to amend the principal motion by changing the number of student members on the Scholastic Deficiency Committee from one to two. The motion was seconded and, after discussion, put to a standing vote and carried: yes, 70; no, 45. Tellers, for this and other standing votes, included: Mr. C. L. Constance, Mr. Fred Mohr, Mr. D. T. Smith, and Mr. George Struble.

Mr. R. T. Ellickson moved to amend the principal motion by providing that the student members specified on the several committees be in addition to the number of faculty members currently authorized. The motion was seconded.

Mr. R. W. Haller inquired whether Mr. Ellickson's motion was in order. The chairman ruled that the motion was in order; he pointed out that the principal motion, in the case of the Committee on the Curriculum, who~e faculty membership is specified in faculty legislation, provLdes that one student member be added to the authorLzed number of faculty members.

In reply to an inquiry from the floor, Mr. Dart stated that he did not have information at hand concerning any provisions of faculty legislation specifying the number of faculty members on the several committees listed in the principal motion, apart from the Co ittee on the Curriculum. The secretary stated that he believed that only in the case of the Committee on the Curriculum was the number of members specified in legislation. Mr. A. P. Rubin inquired what effect Mr. Ellickson's amendment would have in the case of committees for which there is no faculty legislation specifying the number of members. The chairman replied that the Committee on Committees and the President could continue to exercise their discretion in determining the number ok members needed for effective committee operation; however, if Mr. Ellickson's motion should carry, the Committee on Committees and the President might understand this action to indicate faculty sentiment that the total number of faculty members on the several eommittees not be increased.

Mr. Struble inquired whether Mr. Ellickson would accept, as a substitute for his amendment, the deletion of the following words from the second sentence of the last paragraph in the principal motion: "They will be included within the normal committee memberships without addition to the size of committees where size is specified in existing faculty legislation, except that . . . " Mr. Ellickson stated that he would not accept this substitution.

After further discussion, Mr. Ellickson's motion was put to a standing vote and defeated: yes, 41; no, 60. The principal motion, as amended, was then put to a vote and carried.

AMENDMENT OF SEC. I.A.3 OF CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT. Mr. F. R. Lacy, chairman of the Student Conduct Committee, moved on behalf of his committee that Sec. I.A.3 of the Code of Student Conduct be amended by adding the folIowing sentence: Nothing in this code should be interpreted as depriving a student of freedom to take reasoned and orderly exception to the data or views presented or to the methods of instruction utilized in his classes.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Basye reported that the Faculty Senate recommended its adoption. Mr. Lacy spoke to his motion and Mr. Patton summarized the Senate discussion. Mr. Robinson reported that the Student-Faculty Council recommended the approval of the motion.

Mr. T. A. Brady moved to amend by deleting the words "reasoned and orderly." The motion was lost for lack of a second.

Mr. George Streisinger moved to change the order of business by deferring further consideration of Mr. Lacy's motion until immediately after action on Mr. Sidney Bernhard's motion to repeal Sec. I.B.2.j of the Code of Student Conduct, which specifies as an offense "Conduct which intentionally obstructs or disrupts the educational process." The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

AMMENDMENT OF SEC. I.A.2 OF CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT. Mr. Franklin Lowenthal moved:

That, in Sec. I.A.2 of the Code of Student Conduct, the sentence, "Ordinarily, the University will not impose further sanctions after law enforcement agencies or the courts have disposed of a case," be deleted.

That the faculty requests that the Student Conduct Committee amend II. The Administration of the Code by incorporating therein, in an appropriate place: The Associate Dean of Students shall refer to the Student Court or to the Student Conduct Committee all alleged violations of Sec. I.B.2, d, e, or ; of the Code of Student Conduct which constitute interference with the normal functioning of the University and which arose out of, or in connection with, an incident that has led to the conviction of the student in a municipal, county, state, or Federal court. The investigation of the alleged violation and the imposition of sanctions wherever warranted shall not be delayed or postponed because of appeals of the conviction that are being considered by the courts.

The motion having been seconded, the chairman called attention to the fact that the second paragraph, when presented to the faculty at the March 1969 meeting on notice, proposed to amend Sec. E of II. The Administrstion of the Code. In the course of Paculty Senate consideration of the motion, however, it was pointed out that II. The Administration of the Code is not faculty legislation but, rather, incorporates procedures for the implementation of the Code of Student Conduct, which have been adopted by the Student ~onduct Committee under authority delegated to it by the faculty, and that these procedures include a provision that II. The Administration of the Code may be amended only by the action of the Student Conduct Committee. The chairman stated that, when this was called to Mr. Lowenthal's attention, he revised the second paragraph ofhis motion to take the form of a request to the Student Conduct Committee to amend II. The Administration of the Code,

Mr. Basye reported that the Faculty Senate recommended the adoption of Mr. Lowenthal's motion, as revised, Mr. Lowenthal spoke to his motion, and Mr. Patton summarized the Senate discussion.

After discussion, Mr. T. W. Mapp moved the previous question. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried by the required two-thirds majority. Mr. Lowenthal's motion was then put to a standing vote and carried: yes, 48; no, 32.,

ADJOURNMENT. Mr. L. H. Klemm moved that the meeting be adjourned until 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 23. The motion was seconded. Mr. Lowenthal inquired whether Mr. Klemm's motion could be amended to change the hour to 4:30 p.m. The chairman stated that such an amendment would not be in order. Mr. Bernhard, author of a motion which would be on the agenda for such an adjourned meeting, stated that he would not be able to attend. Mr. Klemm indicated that he was not willing to modify his motion. Mr. Sherwood inquired whether a simple motion to adjourn would take precedence over Mr. Rlemm's motion. The chairman ruled that Mr. Klemm's motion had precedence. The motion was then put to a vote and defeated. Mr. S. B. Greenfield moved that the meeting be adjourned. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

George N. Belknap Secretary of the Fac~lty REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY May 7, 1969

The meeting was called to order by Acting President Johnson. The minutes of the meetings of April 9 and 16, 1969 were approved.

AOVISORY COUNCIL ELECTION. A first electing ballot cast by mail during the month of April resulted in the election of Mr. K. S. Ghent as a member of the 1969-70 Advisory Council. A second electing ballot cast at this meeting resulted in the election of the following six members, completing the election: W. M. Basye, E. A. Cykler, Arthur Mittman, Earl Pomeroy, J. C~ Sherwood, J. N. Tattersall.

Mr. Leonard Calvert, Mr. J. S. Carlson, Mr. C. L. Constance, Mr. Fred Mohr, and Mr. George Struble served as tellers.

FACUI.TY SENATE ELECTIONS. First electing ballots cast by mail during the month of April resulted in the election of the following members of the Faculty Senate for two-year terms:

Liberal Arts Group--E. R. Bingham, Robert Campbell, P; E. Dart, K. S. Ghent, Ivan Niven, J. C. Sherwood, L. W. Staples, J. N. Tattersall, completing the election.

Professional and Unaffiliated Group--T. O. Ballinger, F. A. Cuthbert, E. A. Cykler, C. T. Duncan~, Grace Graham, O. J. Hollis, J. L. Hulteng.

A second electing ballot cast at this meeting resulted in the election of one additional member from the professional-unaffiliated group, Mr. Hans Linde, completing the election. Mr. Calvert, Mr. Constance, and Mr. Mohr served as tellers for this election and for other counted votes during the meeting.

ADVISORY COUNCIL REPORT. Mr. Hulteng, chairman of the 1968-69 Advisory Council, presented the final report of the 1968-69 Council. A copy of the report is filed in the office of the secretary of the faculty as a part of these minutes.

HIGHER EDUCATION AND THE 196g OREGON LEGISLATURE, Mr. Hulteng moved, on behalf of the Advisory Council, the adoption of the following resolution:

Current legislative proposals for political intervention in the organization and administration of higher education in Oregon have given rise to concern among the members of this faculty that a radical change in state education policy may be imminent.

We have believed that the state of Oregon had as its goal in higher education the achievement of a high-guality program, balanced among undergraduate teaching, graduate education and research, and service to the community. In the implementation of this broad objective, the State Board of nigher Education has been able both to maintain its own independence and to permit the individual institutions to fulfill their specialized roles within the State System. Ne have also believed that the state had a strong commitment to academic freedom--to the preservation of an intellectual environment in which students and faculty members were free to explore ideas and to act unhampered by unreasonable and unnecessary restraints.

During the current legislative session the following developments have suggested that changes in both policies and goals are in prospect:

(1) The proposal that enrollment of out-of-state students at Oregon colleges and universities be sharply reduced by a quota system;

(2) The proposal that line-item control be imposed by the Legislature on certain sections of the budget for the State System of Higher Education;

(3) The proposal that the separate board for the State System of H-igher Education be abolished and its functions vested in a single, joint board with jurisdiction over elementary and secondary education, community colleges, and the Higher Education System institutions;

(4) The proposal that the office of the Chancellor of the State System of Higher Education be moved from the University campus to the state capitol offices at Salem;

(5) The proposal that salary differentials among State System institutions be reduced arbitrarily, without regard for the differences in roles and qualifications that may have led to the fixing of salary structures originally;

(6) The proposal that the Governor be empowered to declare an emergency on State System campuses and exclude categories of citizens from those campuses;

(7) The proposal that State System dormitory complexes be sold in order to finance the construction of a domed sports arena and exposition center.

These and other proposals that have received at Least preliminary consideration by committees of the state Legislature all p~int toward a vastly grester degree of legislative direction of the internal operations of the Oregon State System of Higher Education than has been the case in the past.

The members of the faculty of the University of Oregon therefore respectfully request that the President of the University communicate their concern to the Chancellor that such a trend would be gravely detrimental to the stature of the University, to the future of the Oregon State System of Higher Education, and to the quality of educationalexperience that this System will be able to provide to the students who comeihere in the future.

The motion was seconded. Mr. Linde questioned the accuracy of numbered paragraph (6). Mr. Hulteng, with the consent of his second, accepted the revision of paragraph (6) to read: "The proposal that the Governor be empowered to declare an emergency on State System campuses, after which the police must exclude categories of citizens from those campuses." Mr. Roland Bartel moved to delete numbered paragraph (4); the motion was seconded, put to a vote, and defeated. The principal motion was then put to a vote and carried.

.

REORGANIZATION OF THE GRADUATE COUNCIL. Miss Leona E. Tyler gave •^ notice that, at the June 1969 faculty meeting, she would present a motion for the reorganization of the Graduate Council, and stated that the full text of the motion would be mailed to members of the faculty within the next few days. The motion is as follows:

That the faculty legislation of December 3, 1952, setting forth the membership, powers, and responsibilities of the Graduate Council be repealed, and that the following legislation be adopted to replace it:

(1) That a Graduate Council be established, consisting of the following: one representative elected by each of the departments in the College of Liberal Arts offering major programs leading to graduate degrees; three representatives elected by the College of Education; two representatives elected by each of the following: the School of Architecture and Allied Arts, the School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, and the College of Business Administration; one representative elected by each of the following: the School of Journalism, the School of Librarianship, and the School of Music; one member elected by the directors of the several established interdisciplinary master's degree programs; the current president of the Graduate Student Council and two additional graduate students to be elected for a one-year term by graduate students in accordance with procedures established by the Graduate Student Council; the dean of the Graduate School, as permanent chairman; the associate dean of the Graduate School for academic affairs, as permanent voting vice-chairman; and the associate dean of the Graduate School for research, as a voting member;

(2) That each faculty member of the Council be elected for a threeyear term, and shall be eligible for re-election;

(3) That the dean of the Graduate School be authorized to appoint annually, upon presentation of suitable evidence, one additional voting member to represent, for a one-year term, a department or program (outside the College of Liberal Arts) not satisfactorily represented under the provisions of (1) above;

(4) That each of those departments within the professional schools and colleges and each of those interdisciplinary programs not individually represented on the Council under the provisions set forth in (1), above, be given the option of electing an ex officio (nonvoting);member to the Council;

(5) That ex officio (nonvoting) membership on the Council be granted the Dean of Faculties, the dean of the College of Liberal Arts, the University Librarian, the Director of Admissions, the Registrar, and the Associate Dean of Graduate Students, Office of Student Affairs; t6) That the general faculty of the University delegate to the Graduate Council as thus constituted the authority now held by the general faculty to establish policies and regulations governing graduate study at the University of Oregon, excluding those matters requiring approval by the Oregon State Boart of Higher Education or the Chancellor of the State System of Nigher Education;

(7) That nothing in this legislation be interpreted to preclude the right of appeal to the general faculty on matters pertaining to graduate policies and regulations;

(8) That the Graduate Council elect from its membership six persons to serve on a nine-member Executive Committee, for staggered three-year terms; and that the Council determine, for the first members to be elected, who is to serve one-year, two-year, and full three-year terms;

(9) That the current president of the Graduate Student Council serve as a voting member of the Executive Committee;

(10) That the dean of the Graduate School serve as permanent chairman of the Executive Committee, and the associate dean for academic affairs serve as permanent voting vice-chairman; and

(11) That it be the responsibility of the Executive Committee of the Graduate Council: (a) to administer the policies and regulations established by the Graduate Council concerning graduate work; (b) to provide rules and procedures for the effective administration and application of these policies and regulations, and to interpret the regulations in irregular cases; (c) to recommend to the Graduate Council changes in, or additions to, the policies and major regulations of the Graduate School; (d) to provide for the maintenance of high standards of graduate instruction; and (e) to consider all proposals for changes in courses carrying graduate credit and all proposals for new graduate curricula and degrees, and to present its recommendations to the Committee on the Curriculum.

RESEARCR COMMITTEE. Miss Tyler gave notice that, at the June 1969 faculty meeting, she would move that the Research Committee be reconstituted as a committee of the Graduate School, and stated that the full text of the motion would be mailed to members of the faculty with her motion on the reorganization of the Graduate Council. The motion on the Research Committee is ia follows:

That the facuity legislation of December 3, 1952, establishing a standing Research Committee and setting forth its responsibilities be repealed, and that the following legislation be adopted to replace it:

That a Research Committee be established as a~standing committee, to advise the Graduate Council and the Graduate School in the promotion and encouragement of research in the University. The committee, which shall be appointed by the dean of the Graduate School with the approval of the Graduate Council, shall consist of eleven members, including at least one representative each of the physical sciences, the biological sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities, and two representatives of the professional schools. The associate dean of the Graduate School for research shall serve as permanent chairman of the committee. It shall be the duty of the committee: (1) to familiarize itself with research in progress in the University and with such problems as facilities and financial aid, which may affect the fruitful development of projects, and to make recommendations for the solution of such problems; (2) to familiarize itself with the policies of agencies outside the University which offer grants in aid of research, and to provide information and assistance in connection with applications £or such grants; (3) to review applications for grants in aid of research from University funds allocated to the Graduate School for this purpose, and to present recommendations; (4) to review, in cases where ttme permits, proposals for grants from outside agencies which require the official endorsement of the University, and to present recommendations; (5) to study any other problems which may arise that affect the development of research in the University.

COi)E OF STUDENT CONDUCT. Mr. W. T. Simpson, chairman of an ad hoc Committee on the Code of Student Conduct, gave notice on behalf of his committee that he would move, at the October 1969 faculty meeting, that the recommendations contained in the May 1969 report of the ad hoc Committee on the Code of Student Conduct be adopted. Mr. Simpson stated that the full text of the committee's report and recommendations would be mailed to the faculty within the next few days, and would again be distributed to the faculty before the October meeting. A copy of the report is filed in the office of the secretary of the faculty as a part of these minutes.

CANCELLATION OF CLASSES. Mr. K. N. Porter gave notice that he would move at the June 1969 faculty meeting the adoption of the following resolution: Resolved: that it is the sense of the University of Oregon faculty that no general cancellation of classes or alteration of their normal character should be instituted except (1) by vote of the faculty or (2) in the interests of the health or safety of the University community.

NOTICES OF FACULTY STATUS. Mr. Thomas Hovet gave notice that he would move at the June 1969 faculty meeting that the faculty request the Advisory Council to take all steps necessary to insure that the University of Oregon abide by the "Statement on Recruitment and Resignation of Faculty Members" adopted by the Association of American Colleges in January 1961 and by the American Association of University Professors in April 1961--especially those provisions which state that "institutions should make provision for notice tQ all faculty members, not later than March 15 of each year of their status the following fall, including rank . . . and prospective salary."

REPEAL OF SEC. I.B,2.j OF THE CODE OF STUDENT GONDIICT. Mr. Sidney Bernhard moved that Sec. I.B.2.j of the>:eode of Student Conduct, specifying as an offense, "Conduct Which intentionally obstructs or disrupts the educational process," be repealed, and that Sec. I.B.2.k be renumbered Sec. I.B.2.j. The motion was seconded.

Mr. Basye, secretary of the Faculty Senate, reported that the Senate recommended the disapproval of the motion. Mr. Bernhard spoke to his motion, and Mr. C. P. Patton, reporter for the March 26 Senate meeting, summarized the Senate discussion. Mr. Patton pointed out that the Senate had first considered and voted to recommend approval of a motion by Mr. F. R. Lacy, on behalf of the Student Conduct Committee, to add the following sentence to Sec. I.A.3 of the Code, "Nothing in this Code should be interpreted as depriving a student of freedom to take reasoned and orderly exception to the data or views presented or to the methods of instruction utilized in his classes," and, having taken this action, had then voted to recommend the disapproval of Mr. Bernhard's motion. Mr. Lady's motion was, however, not yet before the faculty at this meeting, since the faculty, at its April 16 meeting, had voted to give first consideration to Mr. Bernhard~s motion.

After discussion, Mr. Linde inquired whether it would be in order to move to refer both Mr. Bernhard's and Mr. Lacy's motions back to the Student Conduct Committee for revision in the light of defects pointed out in the discussion. The chairman ruled that, at the present time, such a motion could pertain only to Mr. Bernhard's motion. Mr. Linde then moved that Mr. Bernhard's motion be returned to the Student Conduct Committee. Mr. Hollis rose to a point of order, pointing out that Mr. Bernhard's motion did not originate in the Student Conduct Committee and could, therefore, not be returned to this committee. Mr. Linde restated his motion, changing the word "returned" to "referred." His motion was seconded. After discussion, Mr. Walter Freauff moved the previous question on the motion to refer. Mr. Freauff's motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried. Mr. Lind's motion was then put to a Oote and defeated.

Mr. Bower Aly moved the previous question on Mr. Bernhard's motion. The motion for the previous question was seconded, put to a vote, and carried. The principal motion was then put to a vote by a show of hands and defeated: yes' 69; no, 114.

AMENDMENT OF SEC. I.A.3 OF THE CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT. The faculty then proceeded to the consideration of Mr. Lacy's motion to amend Sec. I.A.3 of the Code of Student Conduct by adding the following sentence: "Nothing in thls Code should be interpreted as depriving a student of freedom to take reasoned and orderly exception to the data or views presented or to the methods of instruction utilized in his classes." At the April 16 meeting of the faculty, the motion had been made and seconded, the favorable recommendation of the Faculty Senate reported, and the Senate discussion summarized, before the faculty voted to defer further consideration until immediately after action on Mr. Bernhard's motion. Mr. Linde moved to refer Mr. Lacy's motion back to the Student Conduct Committee for revision in the light of comments on its deficiencies in the course of discussion of Mr. Bernhard's motion. The motion to refer was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

VIOLENCE AND THREATS OF VIOLENCE ON UNIVERSITY CAMPUSES. Mr. Franklin Lowenthal moved the adoption of the following resolution on behalf of himself and 21 cosponsors (W. C. Bauman, R. B. Burckel, P. L. Csonka, H. F. Dizney, E. W. Dils, E. G. Ebbighausen, R. T. Ellickson, R. A. Ellis, K. A. Erickson, L. R. Geser, W. S. Hanna, A. C. Hearn, P. S. Holbo, J. O. Johnston, E. H. Lund, R. F. Mikesell, E. R. Reuter, George Struble, J. E. Suttle, A. L. Thomas, W. L. Van Loan):

Whereas the faculty of the University of Oregon has consistently expressed itself on such issues as academic freedom, human rights, and the free and open expression of ideas:

Be it resolved that the faculty of the University of Oregon views with deep concern the current trend among some members of university communities throughout this country to resort to violence and the threat of violence in the pursuit of their goals. We hold that it is detrimental to the achievement of the goals of educational and social reform to have negotiations conducted in such an atmosphere of threat and intimidation that fear of personal injury or property damage may override reason and sound judgment in decision-making.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Basye reported that the Faculty Senate recommended its adoption. Mr. Lowenthal spoke to his motion, and Mr. Patton summarized the Senate diseussion. Mr. V. R. Lorwin moved that the motion be tabled. The motion to table was seconded,~pue,to-a vote by a show of hands, and carried: yes, 89; no, 36.

ADJOURNMENT. Mr. Sherwood moved that, when this faculty adjourns, it adjourn to meet at 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 21, or on such other day as the chairman may determine to be feasible. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

MR. LOWENTHAL'S RESOLUTION ON CAMPUS VIOLENCE. Mrs. Annette M. Porter geve notice that she would move at the June 1969 faculty meeting to remove from the table Mr. Lowenthal's resolution on campus violence and threats of violence.

AMMENDMENT OF CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT. Mr. Aly gave notice that he would move at the June 1969 faculty meeting that Mr. Basye, Mr. Lacy, and Mr. Linde be named an ad hoc committee to recommend to the faculty any amendments of the Code of Student Conduct deemed desirable.

FACULTY ELECTION PROCEDURES. Mr. Struble gave notice that he would move at the June 1969 faculty meeting for changes in procedures for nomination and election of members of the Advisory Council and the Faculty Senate. He stated that the full text of his motion would be mailed to the faculty within the next few days. The motion is as follows:

(A) That legislation of February 7, 1968 concerning balloting procedures in faculty elections be. repealed.

(B) That the first electing ballot in regular Advisory Council and Faculty Senate elections shall include, in alphabetical order, the names of:

(1) All current members of the Advisory Counci1 or the Faculty Senate, respectively, who are eligible for re-election.

(2) Eligible candidates nominated by petition signed by 2 per cent of the total number of voting faculty members currently in residence on the University campus, and filed with the secretary of the faculty not less than four weeks before the first electing ballots are distributed.

(3) In case the total number of candidates provided through (1) and (2), above, is less than three times the number of positions to be filled, additional candidates nominated by the Committee on Committees (serving as a nominating committee) to provide a total number of candidates equal to three times the number of positions to be filled.

Provided, however, that the list of candidates shall not include (a) the name of any faculty member who has notified the secretary of the faculty in writing, not less than four weeks before the first electing ballots are distributed, that he does not wish to serve as a member of either or both of these bodies; or (b) the name of any facul~y member who will not be on campus during the ensuing adademic year.

(C) That the secretary of the faculty shall mail to the faculty, at least one week before first electing bablots are distributed, list-s of the candidates whose names will appear on the respective ballots.

(D) That existing rules governing the number of votes required for election be retained, and the rule governing the elimination of candidates on second and succeeding ballots in Advisory Council elections be extended to cover Faculty Senate elections.

(L) That nominations in special elections to fill Advisory Council or FacuIty Senate vacancies shall be conducted by nominating ballot in accordance with present practice.

(F) That a calendar and procedures for the implementation of this legislation shall be drafted by the secretary of the faculty, and shall take effect upon approval by the Faculty Senate.

(G) That the first two electing ballots in any election may be conducted by mail, if a satisfactory calendar providing for two mail ballots is approved by the Paculty Senate.

RECOGNIZED MINOR EActTLTIES. Mr. Basye moved, on behalf of the Paculty Senate, to amend legislation of March 1, 1967 concerning membership of the Faculty Senate by changing Sec. (2) to read as follows:

(2) That the following distinct and organized minor faculties shall be recognized by the general faculty of the University: College of Liberal Arts; School of Architecture and Allied Arts; College of Business Administration; School of Community Service and Public Affairs; College of Education; School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation; School of Journalism; School of Law; School of Librarianship; Sbhool of Music.

The motion was seconded. Mr. Hollis, chairman of the Faculty Senate, stated that the primary purpose of the motion was to add the minor faculty of the School of Community Service and Public Affairs to the list of minor faculties recognized by the general faculty of the University and entitled to representation in the Faculty Senate. He also pointed out that, in accordance with the Senate membership formula provided in the March 1, 1967 legislation, the proposed amendment would increase the total membership of the Faculty Senate from thirty-two to thirty-six. The motion was then put to a vote and carried.

FACULTY SENATE ELECTIONS BY T~'INOR FACULTIES. Mr. Basye moved, on behalf of the Faculty Senate, to amend the March 1, 1967 legislation by adding a new Sec. (4):

(4) That, in the election of members of the Faculty Senate by the several minor faculties:

(a) No faculty member shall be eligible to vote in Senate elections in more than one minor faculty.

(b) Any faculty member who is affiliated with more than one minor faculty shall be eligible to vote in Senate elections only in the minor faculty of the school or college in which he is employed for the largest portion of his servicej as shown by the University budget, provided the budget ahows an unequal division of service responsibilities.

.

(c) Any faculty-member for whom the University budget ~hows an equal distribution of service among two or more schools or colleges must choose the one minor faculty with whinh he wishes to be affiliated for the purpose of Senate elections, and must notify the dean of each of the divisions involved, in writing, of his choice among the several minor faculties.

(d) Nothing in this section shall be interpreted to ehange the provisions of legislation of February 14, 1951 that Faculty Senate elections by minor faculties must be by secret ballot and that the voting privilege in minor-faculty Senate elections must be restricted to those eligible to vote in general faculty meetings.

The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and earried.

AMENDMENT OF SEC. I.E.4 OF THE CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT. Mr. Lacy moved, on behalf of the Student Conduct Committee, to amend Sec. I.E.4 of the Code of Student Conduct by deleting the second sentence: "Such written regulations or rules shall be effective fifteen days after filing with the secretary of the committee unless disapproved within this period by the eommittee."

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Basye reported that the Faculty Senate recommended its approval. Mr. Lacy spoke to his motion, and Mr. Dart, reporter for the April 30 Senate meeting, summarized the Senate diseussion. The motion was then put to a vote and carried.

-

STUDENT EVALUATION OF TEACHING. Mr. H. N. Goldstein withdrew a motion concerning student evaluation of teaching, notiee of which he had given at the April 9, 1969 faculty meeting.

PATENT POLICIES. Mr. L. H. Klemm, chairman of the Patent Policies Committee, moved on behalf of his committee that it is deemed desirable for all faculty members to sign the "Agreement to Assign Patent Rights" of the University of Oregon.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Basye reported that the Faculty Senate recommended its approval. Mr. Klemm spoke to his motion, and Mr. Dart summarized the Senate diseussion. The motion was then put to a vote and earried.

ADJOURNMENT. Mr, Patton~imoved that the meeting be adjourned. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried. The chairman stated that, in aecordance with the provisions of Mr. Sherwood's motion for an adjourned meeting, an adjourned meeting would be held on Friday, March 16, at 3:30 p.m. in 138 Commonwealth Hall.

ADJOURNED MEETING OF THE FACULTY

May 16, 1969

The meeting was called to order by Acting President Johnson.

ADVISORY COUNCIL OFFICERS. The secretary announced that the 1969-70 Advisory Couneil has elected the following Council officers: E.A. Cykler, chairman; Earl Pomeroy, vice-chairman; J. C. Sherwood, secretary.

PASS-NO PASS CREDIT. Mr. J. H. Hansen gave notice, on behalf of himself and Mr. Herbert Bisno, that he would move at the June 1969 faculty meeting that, since the intent of the previous pass-no pass legislation was to allow students freedom to take 36 hours of pass-no pass course work at their election, pass-no pass credits earned in courses which by faculty actLon must give pass-no pass grades (Ed Practica and Student Teaching, CSPA Practica, etc.) be counted as a part of the 150 "graded'. hours required for graduation.

ADMISSION POLICY. Mr, Sherwood moved the adoption of the following resolution--Resolved: The faculty recommends to the appropriate authorities that at least through 1969-70 "disadvantaged" itudents be admitted without meeting the usual entrance requirements if they are associated with a program which provides adequate financial and academic support. The Admissions Policy Committee shall review the adequacy of a proposed program after the President of the University has certified that it is within the financiai resources of the University. The committee shall have power to interpret and to make exceptions. Nothing in this motion shall preclude the admission of certain other students customarily admitted without meeting usual standards.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. W. M. Basye, secretary of the Faculty Senate, reported that the Senate recommended its approval, Mr. Sherwood spoke to his motion, and Mr. Basye summarized the Senate discussion.

Mr. K. W. Porter moved to amend by providing that a faculty committee shall be appointed to investigate and report to the faculty on the purposes, organization, operations, results, and other relevant aspects of all the University of Oregon programs for the disadvantaged. The motion to amend was seconded and, after discussion, put to a vote and defeated.

After further discussion of the principal motion, Mr. R. O. Young inquired whether Mr. Sherwood would accept the addition of the words "and/or minority" following the word "disadvantaged" in the first sentence of his motion. Mr. Sherwood stated that he would not accept this addition. The principal motion was then put to a vote and carried.

AD HOC COMMITTEE TO STUDY R.O.T.C.CURRICULUM, Mr. H. W. Robinson, chairman of the Student-Faculty Council, moved on behalf of the Council that the faculty request the President to appoint an ad hoc committee, consisting of four students, three faculty members, and two ex officio nonvoting members of the faculty of the Department of Military Science and Aerospace Studies for the purpose of working with that department in an examination of and possible revision of their curricular approach.

Mr. O. J. Hollis rose to a point of order, suggesting that the motion involved changes of policy and therefore required notice. He pointed out: (1) that the motion would assign to an ad hoc committee functions which, under present faculty policy and legislation, are responsibilities of the Committee on the Curriculum: "the continuing study and review of exsisting courses and curricula, and the presentation of recommendations for revision to deans, department heads, and minor faculties, and advice and assistance to schools and departments in the planning of new programs, with special attention to the relation of such programs to general curricular and academic policies of the University and to overall plans for the development of its instructional program"; and (2) that the proposed ad hoc committee would impose a direct external influence on the curriculum of an established instructional division of the University, a proposal which is without precedent under existing faculty policy for curricular development. The chairman invited discussion of Mr. Rollis' point of order. After discussion, he ruled that Mr. Robinson's motion required notice. Mr. Robinson then gave notice that he would present the motion stated above at the June 1969 meeting of the faculty.

USE OF STUDENT FEES. Mr. Robinson moved, on behalf of the StudentFaculty Council, the adoption of the following resolution--Resolved: That the faculty of the University of Oregon recognizes and commends the Associated Students of the University of Oregon for their bold reassessment of priorities in the use of student fees, in which reassessment they have exhibited a concern for problems of higher education and society. The motion having been seconded, Mr. Bower Aly moved that consideration of the resolution be postponed until the June 1969 faculty meeting. Mr. Aly's motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY. Acting President Johnson reported that a plan has been formulated to raise funds for the financial support of the University's programs for the education of disadvantaged students during 1969-70. Under this plan, students will be asked to contribute year-end balances in their breakage deposits for this purpose; and faculty and staff members will be asked to pledge one day's pay. A11 contributions will be deposited in the Development Fund, and expenditures will be subject to the approval of a committee of faculty members, civil-service staff members, and students.

The Acting President also commented on a measure now being considered by a subcommittee of the Ways and Means Committee of the Oregon Legislat¢re, which would limit enrollment of out-of-state freshmen students in the institutions of the Oregon State System of Higher Education. The proposed formula would seriously affect only the University of Oregon. If adopted, and put into effect in 1969-70, the measure would require the cancellation of the admission of between 400 and 500 students who have already been notified that they will be admitted to the University in the fall term. The Acting President stated that the University administration and the Chancelloris Office are vigorously opposing the measure.

In response to an invitation for questions and comments, there was an extended discussion of the plan to raise funds for the programs for disadvantaged students-centering on what specific uses will be made of contributions, how the committee in charge will be appointed, the possibility of pressure on individual faculty members for contributions, whether information on individual faculty contributions will be kept confidential, and whether the fund drive is for one year only or may become an annual fund-raising effort. The Acting President stated that the funds raised will be used only to assist in covering the essential direct expenses of maintaining the programs for disadvantaged students, that controls will be exercised through the committee, that he will appoint the faculty members on the committee with the advice of the Committee on Committees, that he will in~truct the director of the Development Fund to keep faculty contributions confidential, and that the present plan contemplates only one fund drive, to support the program during 1969-70.

There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned.

George N. Belknap Secretary of the Faculty REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY June 4, 1969

In the absence of Acting President Johnson, the meeting was called to order by Mr. O. J. Hollis, chairman of the Faculty Senate. The minutes of the meetings of May 7 and 16, 1969 were approved. Mr. Hollis informed the faculty that Mr, Johnson has been overcome by exhaustion through overwork, and must have complete rest for an indefinite period.

J. W. FORRESTER RESOLUTION. Mr. E. A. Cykler, chairman of the Advisory Council, moved on behalf of the Council the adoption of the following resolution:

The faculty of the University acknowledges with gratitude the twelve years of valued service that Mr. J. W. Forrester, Jr., publisher o£ the Pendleton East Oregonian, has given as a member and as president of the State Board of Higher Education. The quality of the System of Higher Education in this state is significantly dependent on the perception, the integrity, and the courage of the State Board members, whose role it is to make the governing policy decisions. Mr. Forrester's substantial contributions of time and effort, all given without compensation, represent a civic investment for which all citizens of Oregon, and particularly those of us in the academio community, are lastingly in his debt.

The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried unanimously. At Mr. Cykler's request, the chairman instructed the secretary to record this resolution in the minutes of this meeting and to send a copy to Mr. For

rester. -

DEAN JONES RESOLUTION. Mr. Cykler moved, on behalf of the Advisory Council, the adoption of the following resolution:

The faculty of the University of Oregon wishes to commend Dean William C. Jones for the service he has given the University over many years of association. From 1941 to 1969 he has served the institution in a variety of capacities, as professor of political science, director of the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Acting President, Dean of Administration, professor of higher education, and director of the Institute for College Teaching.

-

Dean Jones' dedication to the highest principles of academic achievement, his administrative integrity and honesty, and his unselfish devotion to the University, the faculty, staff, and students are deeply appreciated by everyone within and without the University who has known him. The faculty wishes him many years of continued activity in higher education.

The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried unanimously. At Mr. Cykler's request, the chairman instructed the secretary to record this resolution in the minutes of this meeting and to send a copy to Dean Jones.

ACTING PRESIDENT JOHNSON RESOLUTION. Mr. Cykler moved, on behalf of the Advisory Council, the adoption of the following resolution:

The faculty of the University of Oregon wishes to express its appreci- -

ation and commendation of the outstanding leadership given this institution during the past year by Acting President Charles E. Johnson.

The presidency of a large state institution is an exacting task in the best of times, This has been a year of severe financial constraints for the University. Restless pressures for internal change and reform have been present on this campus as across the country. A large segment of public and legislative opinion has often seemed critical of our minor problems and unappreciative of the diplomacy and adherence to principle which have assured peaceful change and preserved academic order.

Under President Johnson's leadership, the University of Oregon has been able to maintain academic order, preserve and strengthen traditional academic freedoms, conduct an outstanding educational program, and achieve constructive change, We commend his record of achievement and wish him well in his future endeavors.

The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried unanimously. At Mr. Cykler's request, the chairman instructed the secretary to record this resolution in the minutes of this meeting and to send a copy to Mr. Johnson.

STUDENT-FACULTY COUNCIL REPORT. Mr. H. W. Robinson, chairman of the Student-Faculty Council, presented a report from the Council. A copy of the report is filed in the office of the secretary of the faculty.

CONFERRAL OF DEGREES. The secretary read the following memorandum, dated May 27, 1969, from Mr. C. L. Constance, University Registraro Will you please present to the faculty, at the June meeting, my certification that the Official Degree Lists for exercises of June 15 and August 16, 1969 will include all and only those degree candidates who completed their degree requirements by the end of their respective terms]

Mr, H. T. Roplin moved that the faculty of the University of Oregon recommend that the Oregon State Board of Higher Education confer on the - persons whose names are included in the Official Degree Lists, to be compiled by the University Registrar after the June 15, 1969 Com~nencement and the August 16, 1969 Grsduation Convocation, the degrees for which they have completed all requirements. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

FLORENCE ALOEN MEMORIAL. Miss Betty F. McCue presented the following memorial:

Plorence Della Alden, department chairman at the University of Oregon for 24 years, died in Eugene March 29, 1968, following a brief illness.

Mtes Alden was chairman of the Women's Physical Education Department from 1921 to 1945 when she retired.

Born December 9, 1879 in Springfield, Massachusetts, Miss Alden obtained her bachelor's degree from Smith College in 1904, and later a master's degree from Columbia University.

Her first teaching job was at Stevens College in Columbia, Missouri. She then became interested in recreation and joined the staff of the Y.W.C.A. in Omaha, Nebraska in 1911.

Miss Alden taught at the Bryn Mawr Preparatory School in Baltimore for a number of years, then served as chairman of the women's department of the Public Athletic League of Baltimore during World War I.

The late Dr. John Bovard, then dean of the University of Oregon School of Physical Education, went to the East Coast in 1921 to ask Miss Alden to join the school's faculty as chairman of the Woments Physical Education Department. Although she had also been offered a position at the University of Southern California, Miss Alden chose the University of Oregon because of her love for the Northwest.

Miss Alden taught a class for men and women ×pajors, and one of her first students at the University of Oregon, Dr. Delbert Oberteuffer, remembers the "charming little lady who was developing a fine innovative program for women."

Florence Alden was one of the first people to develop a physical education skill test for women. She worked closely with Dr. Seashore as she formed her ideas.

For many years Miss Alden supervised the Playground Athletic League in Baltimore, Maryland. She was a leader and an organizer in the field of recreation and developed a model playground in Eugene. Miss Alden was also one of the early workers in the Western College Directors Association and the American Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation. She came to the University of Oregon in 1921 as associate professor of physical education, became a full professor in 1923, and, retiring from the directorship of the Department of Physical Education for Women, became professor emeritus in 1945. Miss Alden is revered by her department and her profession for her pioneer work and her contr~butions to programs of physical education for women.

Miss McCue then moved that the faculty adopt the memorial, and that the secretary of the faculty be instructed to record it in the minutes of this meeting and send a copy to Miss Alden's family. The motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried unanimously.

REORGANIZATION OF T8E GRADUATE COUNCIL. Miss Leona E. Tyler with- - drew a motion for the reorganization of the Graduate Council, notice of which was given at the May 7, 1969 faculey meeting, and stated that she would again give notice
of a motion on the same subject at the October 1969 faculty meeting.

RECONSTITUTION OF THE RESEARCH COMMITTEE. Miss Tyler also withdrew a motion for the reconstitution of the Research Committee, notice of which was given at the May 7, 1969 faculty meeting, and stated that she would again give notice of a motion on-the same subject at the October 1969 faculty meeting.

CANCELLATION OF CLASSES. Mr. K. W. Porter moved the adoption of the following resolution--Resolved: That it is the sense of the University of Oregon faculty that no general cancellation of classes or alteration of their normal character should be instituted except (1) by vote of the faculty or (2) in the interests of the health or safety of the University community.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. W. M. Basye, secretary of the Faculty Senate, reported that the Senate recommended its adoption, Mr. Porter spoke to his motion, and Mr. J. L. Hulteng, Senate reporter at this meeting, summarized the Senate discussion.

Mr. J. A. Kieffer moved to amend by adding at the end of the motion, or (3) by act of the President of the University in response to a national proclamation. Mr. Porter, with the consent of his second, accepted Mr. Kieffer's amendment as a part of his motion. After discussion, Mr. Porter's motion was put to a standing vote and defeated: yes, 28; no, 61. Mr. C. L. Constance, Mr. C. B. Pascal, and Mr. Martin Schmitt served as tellers for this and other standing votes during the meeting.

NOTICES OF FACULTY STATUS. Mr. Thomas Hovet moved that the faculty request the President to take all steps necessary to insure that the University of Oregon abide by the "Statement on Recruitment and Resignation of Faculty Members'' adopted by the Association of University Colleges in January 1961 and by the American Association of University Professors in April 1961--especially those provisions which state that "institutions should make provision for notice to all faculty members not later than March 15 of each year of their status the following fall, including rank and (unless unavoidable budget procedures beyond the institution forbid) prospective salary."

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Basye reported that the Faculty Senate recommended its adoption, Mr. Hovet spoke to his motion, and R. M. Wales (who had kept a record of the Senate consideration in the absence of Mr. Hulteng) summarized the Senate discussion. The motion was then put to a vote and carried.

VIOLENCE AND THREATS OF VIOLENCE ON UNIVERSITY CAMPUSES. Mrs. Annette M. Porter moved to remove from the table the following resolution, presented by Mr. Franklin Lowenthal at the May 7, 1969 faculty meeting and tabled by vote of the faculty:

Whereas the faculty of the University of Oregon has consistently expressed itself on such issues as academic freedom, human rights, and the free and open expression of ideas:

-

Be it resolved that the faculty of the University of Oregon views with deep concern the current trend among some members of university •-: communities throughout this country to resort to violence and the threat of violence in the pursuit of their goals. We hold that it is detrimental to the achievement of the goals of educational and social reform to have negotiations conducted in such an atmosphere of threat and intimidation that fear of personal injury or property damage may override reason and sound judgment in decision~making.

The motion was seconded. In reply to an inquiry by Mrs. Porter, the chairman ruled that the motion to remove from the table was undebatable. Mrs. Porter's motion was then put to a standing vote and defeated: Yes, 43; no, 44.

AMENDMENTS OF CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT. Mr. Bower Aly withdrew a motion, notice of which he had given at the May 7, 1969 faculty meeting, for an ad hoc committee to recommend desirable amendments of the Code of Student Conduct.

FACULTY ELECTION PROCEDURES. Mr. George Struble moved the adoption of the following motion:

A. That legislation of February 7, 1968 concerning balloting procedures in faculty elections be repealed.

B, That the first electing ballot in regular Advisory Counni} and Faculty Senate elections shall include, in alphabetical order, the names of:

(1) Eligible candidates nominated by petition signed by two per cent of the total number of voting faculty members currently in residence on the University campus, and filed with the secretary of the faculty not less than four weeks before the first electing ballots are distributed.

(2) In case the total number of candidates provided through (1), above, is less than three times the number of positions to be filled, additional candidates nominated by the Committee on Committees (serving as a nominating committee) to provide a total number of candidates equal to three times the number of positions to be filled.

Provided, however, that the list of candidates shall not include (a) the name of any faculty member who has notified the secretary of the faculty in writing, not less than four weeks before the first e}ecting ballots are distributed, that be does not wish to serve as a member of either or both of these bodies; or (b) the name of any faculty member who will not be on campus during the ensuing academic year.

C. That the secretary of the faculty shall mail to the faculty, at least one week before first electing ballots are distributed, lists of the candidates whose names will appear on the respective ballots.

D. That existing rules governing the number of votes required for election be retained, and the rule governing the elimination of candidates on second and suceeeding ballots in Advisory Council elections be extended to cover Faculty Senate elections.

E. That nominations in special elections to fill Advisory Council or Paculty Senate vacancies shall be conducted by nominating ballot in accordance with present practi~e.

F. That a calendar and procedures for the implementation of this legislation shall be drafted by the secretary of the faculty, and shall take effect upon approval by the Faculty Senate.

G. That the first two electing ballots in any election may be conducted by mail, if a satisfactory calendar providing for two mail ballots is approved by the Faculty Senate.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Basye reported that the Faculty Senate recommend its adoption, Mr. Struble spoke to his motion, and Mr. Hulteng summarized the Senate discussion.

After discussion, Mr. R. W. Haller moved to amend by changing the first paragraph of Sec. (B) (2) to read: In case the total number of candidates provided through (1), above, is less than three times the number of positions to be filled, additioqQ\candidates shall be chosen at random from those elegible, subject to their consent to serve if elected, until the total number of candidates is equal to three times the number of positions to be filled. Mr. Haller's motion was seconded, put to a vote, and defeated.

Mr. S. S. Tepfer moved that Mr. Struble's mot-ion to be refqrred to an appropriate committee for study and report. After discussion, Mr. Tepfer's motion was put to a standing vote, and defeated: yes, 29; no, 55.

Mr. Aaron Novick inquired whether it would be in order to move to amend by providing that votes may be cast for less candidates than the number to be elected. The chairman asked Mr. Struble whether there was any provision in his motion relating to the number of votes required for a valid ballot. Mr. Struble replied that his motion contained no provision related to this matter. The chairman ruled that, since Mr. Novick's suggested amendment was related to existing faculty legislation with which Mr. Struble's motion was not concerned, such an amendment would not be germane to the motion before the faculty and would therefore be out of order. He pointed out that elections that would be goberned by Mr~ StrubleLc motLon, if adopted, would not -take place until-the ~pting of }970, aDd that Mr. Novick would have ample t-ime to propose an amendment of existing Legislation, if he so desired. Mr. Hans Linde appealed~irom the ruling of t~e thair.t By a standing vote, the r:uling Qf the chair was sustained:-yes, 69; no,l6.+

Mr. Struble's motion was then put to a standing vote and carried: yes, 66; no, 23.

PASS-NO PASS CREDIT Mr. J. H. Hansen stated: (1) that he and Mr. Herbert Bisno, co4sponsors of a motion concerning pass-no pass credit, notice of which was given at the May 16, 1969 faculty meeting, have been joined by two additional co-sponsors, Mr. N. D, Sundberg and Mr. C. W. Schminke; and (2) that he and his co-sponsors wish to postpone presentation of the motion until the next meeting of the faculty. The chairman granted permission for postponement of the presentation of the motion.

AD HOC COMMITTEE TO STUDY R.O.T.C. CURRICULUM. Mr. Robinson moved, on behalf of the Student-Faculty Council, that the faculty request the President to appoint an ad hoc committee, consisting of four students, three faculty members, and two ex officio nonvoting members of the faculty of the Department of Military Science and Aerospace Studies for the purpose of working with that department in an examination of and possible revision of their curricular approach.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Basye reported that the Faculty Senate recommended its approval, subject to an amendment which he would move on behalf of the Senate at the proper time, Mr. Robinson spoke to his motion, and Mr. Hulteng summarized the Senate discussion.

Mr. Basye then moved to amend by changing the words "four students'' to "three students." The motion to amend was seconded and, after discussion, put to a standing vote and carried: yes, 45; no, 38.

Mr. R. S. Freeman inquired whether it would be in order to move to amend by adding the following sentence: An additional goal of this committee will be to review and make recommendations to the President concerning the procedure for procuring personnel to staff this department and for granting faculty status to such personnel.

The chairman ruled that such an amendment would be out of order.

Mr. George Stmisinger moved to ammend by providing that the ad hoc committee be instructed to report its findings to this faculty. The motion to amand was seconded. Mr. J. N. Tattersall inquired whether Mr. Streisinger would accept a change of his amendment to provide that the ad hoc committee report to the Committee on the Curriculum and to the faculty. Mr. Streisinger, with the consent of his second, accepted this change. Mr. Streisinger's motion was then put to a standing vote and carried: yes, 54; no, 5.

The principal motion, as amended, was then put to a standing vote and carried: yes, 53; no, 22.

USE OP STUDENT FEES. The chairman stated that Mr. Robinson had moved, at the May 16, 1969 faculty meeting, the adoption of a resolution concerned with the use of student fees, that the motion had been seconded, and that further consideration had been postponed, by vote of the faculty, until this meeting. At the chairman's request, Mr. Robinson read the text of the resolution--Resolved: That the faculty of the University of Oregon recognizes and commends the Associated Students of the University of Oregon for their bold reassessment of priorities in the use of student fees, in which reassessment they have exibitied a concern for the problems of higher education and society.

Mr. Basye reported that, at the proper time, he would move an amendment to Mr. Robinson's motion on behalf of the Faculty Senate, that (with or without this amendment) the Senate voted to disapprove the motion, and that he would move at the proper time, on behalf of the Senate, that the motion be tabied.

Mr. Robinson spoke to his motion, and Mr. Wales summarized the Senate discussion.

Mr. Basye then moved to amend by adding the following sentence: This recognition in no way is to be taken as iindicating approval of specific suggestions for the allocation of funds. Hr. Lowenthal moved to table the principal motion with its pending amendment. The motion to tabie was seconded, put to a standing vote, and carried: yes, 40; no, 23.

RECENT EVENTS IN BERKELEY. Mr. M. D. Girardeau moved the adoption of the following resolution:

The faulty of the University of Oregon wish to express their shock, indignation, and anger over the numberous acts of aggression and crimes of violence committed recently in Berkeley by certain police officers and sheriff's deputies. We hope that those guilty of assault, murder, inciting to riot, or false arrest will be brought to trial and convicted. A situation where those charged with law enforcement regard themselves as not constrained by the same laws is intolerable and fatal to the preservation of a free society.

As part of the same motion, the secretary of the faculty is directed to send a copy of this resolution, if adopted, to the Governor of California.

The motion having been seconded, Mr. Lowenthal rose to object to the consideration of Mr. Girardeau's motion. The chairman stated that a two-thirds majority would be required to sustain Mr. Lowenthal's objection. The question being put to a standing vote, the objection was overruled: yes, 27; no, 35.

After discussion, Mr. Lowenthal moved that the principal motion be tabled. The motion to table was put to a standing vote and defeated: yes, 28; no, 35.

Mr. G. N. Belknap then moved to amend by deleting the second paragraph of the resolution: As a part of the same motion, the secretary of the faculty is directed to send a copy of this resolution, if adopted, to the Governor of California. Mr. Belknap's motion was seconded, put to a vote, and carried.

After further discussion, Mr. Tattersall moved that the principal motion, as amended be tabled. The motion to table was seconded. Mr. Haller rose to a point of order, suggesting that Mr. Tattersall's motion was out of order, since a motion to table had already been made and defeated. The chairman ruled that Mr. Tattersall's motion was in order, since there had been further consideration of Mr. Girardeau's resolution since the first motion to table. The motion to table was then put to a standing vote and carried: yes, 43; no, 16.

FEE INCREASES FOR OUT-OF-STATE STUDENTS. Mr. Larry Chadwick, student representative at this meeting, asked that the faculty take action opposing the recommendation of the Ways and Means Committee of the 1969 Oregon Legislative Assembly for an increase of fees for out-of-state students. The chairman pointed out that Mr. Chadwick, though he had the privilege of the floor, did not have the privilege of initiating legislation, and inquired whether any faculty member was prepared to introduce a motion on this subject.

Mr. R. O. Young moved that the faculty recommend that the State Board of Hidher Education revise downward the proposed 1969-70 fees to be paid by outof-state students who will have over 90 credit hours at the end of the current academic year. The motion was seconded. Mr. M. D. Ross moved that it be tabled. Mr. Ross's motion was seconded, put to a standing vote, and defeated: yes, 18; no, 34.

Mr. Tattersall moved, as a substitute motion, that the faculty express its strong opposition to increases in out-of-state kuition, and recommend that the Advisory Council convey the sentiment of the faculty to the State Board of Higher Education, the State Emergency Board, and any other appropriate authorities. The motion to substitute was seconded, put to a standing vote, and carried: yes, 23; no, 17.

Mr. R. H. Littman moved, as a substitute for Mr. Tattersall's substitute motion, that the faculty recommend that the State Board of Higher Education adopt ways of reducing the recently increased undergraduate tuition for the coming year in such a way that it maximize the likelihood of continuing in school by seniors, then juniors, then sophomores, and then freshmen, in that order. The motion was seconded.

Mr. Robinson rose to a point of order, suggesting that Mr. Littman's substitute was out of order, since it changed the scope of Mr. Young's motion and Mr. Tattersall's substitute to embrace all undergraduate students. The chairman ruled that Mr. Littman's motion was in order.

Mr. Littman's motion to substitute was then put to a standing vote and defeated: yes, 11; no, 30. Mr. Aly moved the previous question; the motion was seconded, was put to a standing vote, and carried: yes, 41; no, 1. Mr. Tattersall's substitute motion, now the principal motion, was then put to a standing vote and carried: yes, 37; no, 5.

VIOLENCE AND THREATS OF VIOLENCE. Mrs. Porter gave notice that she would move at the October 1969 faculty meeting the adoption of the following resolution:

Higher education has for its more than two thousand years of tradition held the human mind and spirit as its highest value. To manipulate another person through force or deception of fear is to reduce him to the level of a thing. This degradation is as c&irupting to the perpetrator as to the victim, since it betrays the common humanity of both.

Therefore be it resolved that the faculty of the University of Oregon strongly repudiate the present trend among some members of university communities to promulgate or threaten violence in the pursuit of their goals, as contrary to the values of higher education.

STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY. Mr. Hollis stated that he was certain that, if President Johnson had been able to attend this meeting, he would want to thank the faculty for their cooperation during the year of his administration, and to wish them a pleasant summer period; and that he, Mr. Hollis, would like to take the liberty of doing this in President Johnson's name.

There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned.

George N. Belknap Secretary of the Faculty


Web page spun on 13 July 2004 by Peter B Gilkey 202 Deady Hall, Department of Mathematics at the University of Oregon, Eugene OR 97403-1222, U.S.A. Phone 1-541-346-4717 Email:peter.gilkey.cc.67@aya.yale.edu of Deady Spider Enterprises